Report1

Music and Driving

Leon Mosher


Table of Contents

  • Instructions for this Report found here

  • Comments on G7 Conversations

  • What Does the Future Hold for My Music and Driving

  • My Searches

  • How Do I Compare

  • Conclusion

  • Navigation Guide

    Comments on G7 Conversations

    Mr. Sasabe (G7) wrote:
    I got caught speeding twice in my life and both of the times it was because I was listening to the music in my car and did not realize how fast I was going. Maybe it's all about the "training" that Dr. James has been talking about, but when my favorite music comes out, I just lose myself! On a different day, I was driving and realized that music was off. It was a bit of surprise because I was so calm and relaxed that it was almost like I was meditating. So I recommend that you guys sometimes stop listening to the music in your car. It's really different!

    For Mr. Sasabe, music is a distraction which is detrimental to his driving ability. While I don't believe that every driver needs to drive without music, I think that some people may not have the cognitive ability to keep focused on an activity such as driving without being distracted by external stimuli. I am just the opposite. When "my favorite music" is playing, I am also totally immersed in my music, but it doesn't affect my driving. If anything, music helps me to relax while I'm driving and tune out the traffic.

    Mr. Miyoshi (G7) wrote:
    This is also something that I have been thinking about while taking this class. Does rock music make us more aggressive and slow methodical music make us a better driver. It is interesting because rock music makes our hearts beat faster and that might get our adrenaline flowing and made us lose some of our senses. Just a thought for everyone to think about.
    I know what Akira is talking about. Once in a while someone turns off the music in my car before I get in and when I realize that it is off it surprises me. I find myself almost in a meditative state when the radio is off. I am more calm and am able to control my feelings more!
    I think that this could work both ways. I think that if you listen to a station that you don't like but doesn't show views that you are strongly against or go totally against your values then this will work. If you just don't like the Dj's or music then thats fine. However if you listen to a station that gets you upset and deals with touchy situations or points then you could get more agressive on the road and other things that drivers do may upset you more. I think I will have to try this before I give a definite answer.

    Mr. Miyoshi brings up a good point which I hadn't ever thought of. It is possible that while driving, the words and views expressed by DJ's may have a profound effect on your emotions and thus be projected towards our behavior and driving on the road. I've never experienced this but I do realize how it is quite possible. The solution to dealing with this problem is the same as with music: self control. It is important to not let your emotions take over your attention while driving.

    Mr. Shintani (G7) wrote:
    I really think that music has an effect on the way a person drives. When I want to drive fast I play a CD that has a powerful or past beat. My favorite is the Top Gun sound track. If I want to relax while driving I would put in a mellow CD like Kalapana or some type of soft rock. I dont listen to rap so I dont know the effects of listening to this type of music.
    I really think that some music causes bad driving behavior than others. I can see people being more aggressive after listening to heavy metal then to classical music. I has been proven in studies that playing of classical music in malls helps to reduce the amount to violence in metal than to clasical music. I has been proven in studies that playing of classical music in malls helps to reduce the amount to violence in these malls. I do this in two ways by mellowing or relaxing people and by staying away from a certain section of the community that causes a lot of the crimes.

    The type of music one listens to while driving can have a profound effect on how he drives. A widely accepted view is that listening to fast music will make you drive fast and aggressive, and listening to slow music will make you drive slower and less aggressive. I have a slightly different theory. I think that people who normally drive fast will do so regardless of the music. I may drive fast while listening to slow music like reggae or blues, or while listening to fast music like punk or ska. On the other hand, I may drive slow, it all depends on my mood. I believe there are several variables which may help determine how fast a person drives at any given moment. Normal driving behavior, mood, music, time restraints, passengers, type of car, type and speed of driving music, and how the driver reacts to that music at that given moment are a few factors which I see as having an effect on driving behavior.

    Tami Hshimoto (G7) wrote:
    I just wanted to respond to marshall's message on how music affects my driving. When I'm driving, music makes me relaxed and clam. Ifeel that when I'm driving in traffic the music that I listen to helps me to feel less anxious and frustrated. I'm able to tolerate more unsafe drivers by letting them get a head of me. Music is an awesome way to relax when I'm driving.

    Like Tami, music makes me feel relaxed and calm while driving. When my radio was broken, I found myself whistling or singing while driving to make up for the absence of music. I would even play my melodica at stop lights. I know Dr. James wouldn't condone, but I need music.

    Cris Burlem (G7) wrote:
    I have been in the drivers frustration seat many a time as many of us have. My solution to claming down is actually the opposite. I find that by turning off the radio I am able to relax when I am in an uptight mood to begin with. I find that turning off the radio helps me concentrate on the road and what is going on. It is at these times that I think music actually irritates me?!?

    Cris is another advocate of the "turn off the radio" to "concentrate on the road and what is going on." More power to you. While I do admit that there are times when I like to drive without music, more often than not I would like to listen to music.

    What Does the Future Hold for My Music and Driving

    The future holds a greater awareness of the interaction between my music and my driving. Since I've taken this class, it has made me more conscious of my cognitions and emotions while driving.

    My Searches

    Unfortunately for us UH students, the searches on the Internet for information on music and driving (at least until other professors and researchers begin to catch up) will continue to lead us in a circle back to Dr. James or one of his students. Searching with Infoseek I found this website: Czarina Naranjo (G8, 459), References to Articles on Music & Driving from a Journal ... I also found this one: the Oahu Traffic Safety Council Traffic Psychology Handout. It gives tips and ideas on how to rehabilitate your driving.
    My findings on ERIC and Uncover database

    Allen, Joshua P., Beauregards, Keith, and John D. Mayer. Mood inductions for four specific moods: A procedure employing guided imagery vignettes with music. Jounal of mental imagery, 1995, 19 (1/2), 133.
    Brenton, Myron. The Older Person's Guide to Safe Driving. Public Affairs Pamphlet No. 641. Behavior Journal of Broadcasting; 18, 4, 473-480, F 74. 1974
    Bell, Fred. How to Keep Your Teenage Driver Alive. PTA Today; v8 n4 p21-22 Feb 1983. 1983
    Brenton, Myron. The Older Person's Guide to Safe Driving. Public Affairs Pamphlet No. 641.
    Greenberg, Bradley S.; Wotring, C. Edward. Television Violence and Its Potential for Aggressive Driving
    Gregory, Andrew H. Worrall, Lisa Sarge, Ann. (1996, December). The Development of Emotional Responses to Music in Young Children. Motivation and Emotion, 20, (4) 341.
    Howitt, Dennis; Dembo, Richard. A Subcultural Account of Media Effects Human Relations; 27, 1, 25-42, Jan 74. 1974.
    Johnson, Susan M. (1998, July/August). Listening to the Music: Emotion as a Natural Part of Systems Theory. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 17, 2 1.
    Lehtonen, Kimmo, & Shaughnessy, Michael F. Music as a Treatment Channel of Adolescent Destructivity.
    Madell, Geoffrey. (1996, January). What Music Teaches about Emotion. Philosophy; The Journal of the Royal Institute, 71, (275) 63.
    Marshall, O. W.; Tomcala, Maryjane. Effects of Different Genres of Music on Stress Levels. .: 13p. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association (89th, Los Angeles, CA,
    Malfetti, James L.; Winter, Darlene J.. Drivers 55 Plus: Test Your Own Performance. A Self-Rating Form of Questions, Facts and Suggestions for Safe Driving.
    McHenry, Eric. Moods: Music for Smarting Post-Adolescents, first runner-up, Dorthy Cappon Churchill essay award. New Letters, 1996, 62 (1), 17.
    Riera, Michael. Uncommon Sense for Parents with Teenagers. Celestial Arts 1995
    Robinson, Jenefer. (1994, Winter). The Expression and Arousal of Emotion in Music. The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 52, (1) 13.
    Scherer, Klaus R. (1972). Acoustic Concomitants of Emotional Dimensions: Judging Affect from Synthesized Tone Sequences.
    Stephens, Diane; And Others. Assessment and Decision Making in Schools: A Cross-Site Analysis. Technical Report No. 614. .
    Smith, Donna Ridley, Comp.. Popular Music: A Selected Bibliography of Materials in the California State University, Sacramento Library. Second Edition. Bibliographic Series No. 22.
    Shields, Steven O.; Ogles, Robert M.. The Contribution of "Around the Dial" to American Music Radio Announcing Culture.
    Stratton, Valerie N. and Annete H. Zalanowski. The relationship Between Characteristic Moods and Most Commonly Listened to Types of Music. Journal of Music Therapy, 1997, 34 (2), 129.
    Taylor, Jack A. (1993, July/August). The Evolution and Future of Cognitive Research in Music. Arts Education Policy Review, 94, (6) 35-39.
    Spychiger, Maria B. (1995, Winter). Rationales for Music Education: A View from the Psychology of Emotion. The Journal of Aesthetic Education, 29, (4) 53.
    Water, Lindsay. (1998, July/August). In Responses Begins Responsibility: Music and Emotion. Boundary 2, 25, (2) 95.
    Wigram, Tony. (1995). The Psychological and Physiological Effects of Low Frequency Sound and Music.

    How Do I Compare

    My report is quite similar to the reports of students of past generations. I think this is due to the fact that this is still a very new and under-researched topic. Not to mention the fact that the leading authority in the field is our teacher. As more information becomes available on this topic, I imagine that this report will become quite easier and have the potential to be a lot more thorough.

    Conclusion

    The type of music one listens to while driving can have a profound effect on his/her driving behavior. A widely accepted view is that listening to fast music will make you drive fast and aggressive, and listening to slow music will make you drive slower and less aggressive. I have a slightly different theory. I think that people who normally drive fast will do so regardless of the music. I believe there are several variables which may help determine how fast a person drives at any given moment. Normal driving behavior, mood, music, time restraints, passengers, type of car, type and speed of driving music, and how the driver reacts to that music at that given moment are a few factors which I see as having an effect on driving behavior.
    If you feel that you are in need of an alteration in your driving behavior, I highly recommend you visit Dr. James sites and learn more about Traffic Psychology. The Oahu Traffic Safety Council Traffic Psychology Handout gives tips and ideas on how to rehabilitate your driving. Other than that, all I have to say is drive safe, think about others, and as Dr. Driving says, "Drive with Aloha."

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