#N009



University of Hawaii at Manoa
Department of Psychology
2430 Campus Road Honolulu, Hawaii 96822
Cable Address: UNIHAW

October 28, 1976



MEMORANDUM

TO: Undergraduate Studies Committee

 

FROM: Professor Leon A. James

 

RE: Proposal for "PSY 324"


Brief Summary of Appended Proposal


This is a new course proposal to extend the undergraduate work in Social Psychology.


psychology offerings in


The course content deals with developing skills in the recording, transcribing, and analysis of talk in naturalistic settings (e.g., dinner-time conversations, dyadic face-to-face talk, telephone conversations, talk in public places, classrooms, etc.)

These skills allow the students to become more objective in their perspective on the self as a member of an ethnic-social group. Such skills provide real information about how the social environment is organized, in particular, the talk that goes on everywhere on the "Daily Round" of a person.

Students attend regular class-discussions and lectures (3 hours) during which their class work is explained and put into the context of the theories of contemporary psychology, psycholinguistics, and the analysis of discourse.

Student work is evaluated on the basis of six assignments to be completed as the course requirement. Examples of types of assignments include:

--Recording and analyzing situationally located talk;

--Micro-analysis of bandscripts which are specially prepared segments of tapes in which timing and rhythms are investigated;

 

--Topic development in interactions and in written text through available methods of textual analysis and indexing.


Currently, there are no courses that undergraduates at the UHM can take that teaches them the skills and theory behind the objective analysis of situated talk from the perspective of behavior in social settings

Undergraduate Studies Committee
October 28, 1976
Page Two


The prerequisite for the course should be any previous psychology course at the 200-300 level, so as to make this course available to the majority of the undergraduates.

A special feature of this course is that student laboratory assignments always include the gathering, recording, and classifying of naturalistic records of talk, conversation, and discourse.

It is hoped that the course would appeal to a lot of undergraduates since large class sizes are to the advantage of the laboratory atmosphere of the course. In this way, rather than size being a disadvantage, students have the opportunity of maximizing their learning through variable comparisons with many others whose "daily roundt' circles or community membership varies. The class-laboratory, therefore, assumes a character that is more nearly representative of the cultural macro-cosm outside. Efforts are being made to accumulate these naturalistic records prepared by the students. These Data Banks will be available for all students (not just the students of the course itself) as well as scholars, for information, study, and entertainment.

This course is intended as a large, undergraduate service course in the area of Social Psychology-Psycholinguistics. Professor James, whose specialty deals with this area, will be teaching the course on a regular semester basis. No special costs are anticipated.

(Note: Assignments similar to those to be required for this course have been piloted during the past two semesters by Professor James, and assisted by co-worker and co-author, Dr. Barbara Gordon, Visiting Colleague in Psycholinguistics. These are available for inspection upon request.)



LAJ : ins
Attachment

 

UNIVERSITY OF HANAII AT MANOA

PROPOSAL TO INITIATE, MODIFY OR DELETE A COURSE OF STUDY

FIELD OF STUDY

 

 

1

FIELD OF STUDY TITLE

 

 

Psychology

 

1.       ABBREV.

 

 

PSY

2.       CODE

 

 

10550

3.       CAT.Κ NO.

 

 

324

 

4.ΚΚΚΚΚ OLD CAT NO.

 

 

5. COURSE TITLE (MAXIMUM OF 48 CHARACTERS, INCLUDING SPACES)

 

ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ APPLIED PSYCHOLINGUISTICS IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Κ

6. CREDITS

3

 

 

 

7. SEMESTER(S) OFFERED (CIRCLE ONE ONLY)

1. IΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ 5. I, II & SS
2. IIΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ 6. SS ONLY
3. I, IIΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ 7. UNCOMMITTED
4. IχIl

8. TYPE OF ACTION (CIRCLE AS APPROPRIATE)

1. COURSE DELETIONΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ 3.Κ NEW COURSE
2. COURSE MODIFICATIONΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ a. REGULAR
a. CHANGE IN CREDITSΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ ΚΚΚΚΚΚb. SPECIAL
b. CHANGE IN TITLEΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ 1. HOPE
c. CHANGE IN CAT. NO.ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ 2. SUMBER SESSION
d. OTHER_______________ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ 3. OTHER_____________
ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ (specify)ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ(specify)

 

 

9. CONTACT HOURS

10. TYPE OF INSTRUCTION (CIRCLE ONE ONLY)
LΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ BΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ SΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ XΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ FΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ CΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ T

11. APPROVAL

DATE

 

MONTH

YEAR

 





3

If applicable) COURSE CROSSχLISTED WITH:

 

 

12. FIELD OF STUDY ABBREV

13. FIELD OF STUDY CODE

14. CATALOG NUMBER

 

 

12. FIELD OF STUDY ABBREV

13. FIELD OF STUDY CODE

14. CATALOG NUMBER

 

 

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

 

 

ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ See attached

 

 

 

 

 

 

PREREQUISITE Psy 322 or consent or instructor
COURSE IS REQUIRED FOR ______________degree program (other than yours) in the____________
________________department in the COLLEGE OF_________________
HILO OR COMMUNITY COLLEGE HAS BEEN NOTIFIED____________ . (When other campus also offers course.)ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ ΚΚ(Date)
Κ

 

REASON FOR INITIATING, MODIFYING, OR DELETING COURSE (Attach additional sheets, following instructions from your College and the Graduate Division where pertinent, giving full justification for this proposal.)



 

REQUESTED BY_____________ Psycholoqy __________Κ __________________________ _______________________
ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ (Department)ΚΚΚΚ ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ(Chairman)ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ (Date)
APPROVED BY
Curriculum Committee___________________________Κ __________________________Κ _______________________

 

 

ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ(College or School)ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ (Dean)ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ (Date)
Curriculum Committee___________________________Κ __________________________Κ _______________________

(When secondΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ(College or School)ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ (Dean)ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ (Date)

college involved)

Graduate Division (if for graduate credit)ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ __________________________Κ _______________________ΚΚΚΚΚ

(Dean)ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ (Date)

 


Summer Session (if offered Summer Session Only)ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ __________________________Κ _______________________
ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ
(Dean)ΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚΚ (Date)


Professor Leon James Department of Psychology, UHM


Suggested Catalogue Description

PSY 324 Applied Psycholinguistics in Social Psychology (3 credits)

Techniques of descriptions of one's day to day behavior. Students carry out assigned projects and submit periodic reports which describe various features of their own behavior in natural social settings: e.g., transcripts of talk and conversation; classification of recording practices in the community; objective methodological plans for interpreting and understanding categories of one's experience. Student projects are filed for use by other students and scholars.

Pre-requisite: Psy 322 or consent of instructor.


1. This proposal is for a new undergraduate course to be identified as "Psychology
324." The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to acquire skills related to the field of Social Psychology.

Currently, Psychology 322 is offered as the "Introduction to Social Psychology;" it is a large course and part of the core program in Psychology (2 sections of 200 enrollees each, this semester). The originator of this proposal is Professor of Psychology and has taught Psychology 322 since 1971. Additionally, he is member of the division in the Psychology Department of the Social- Personality Area in which he directs the sub-specialty program known as Psycholinguistics/Ethnosemantics

Student Projects

(a) Recording, transcribing and analyzing a 10-minute segment of a conversational exchange in which the student participates. (Excellent results; 200 students submitted several thousand typed pages and thoughtful commentaries in which they objectify themselves and express their observations in functional terms.)

(b) Cataloguing exercises for "daily round" behaviors: e.g., keeping track by writing down the questions one asks in the course of a day, or, in the course of a lecture; keeping track by indexing and classifying naturally occurring events in units that participants themselves keep track of: e.g., topics, rituals, records, almanacs, schedules, notes, and so on, these being the whoof and fabric of social interactions in real settings.

(c) The application of ethnosemantic methodology as a pragmatic and personally usable framework or intellectual tool for objectifying experience. That is, a key pedagogic function of Social Psychology must be the theory and practice of objectifying personal experience: e.g., by learning how to differentiate between the functional features of their behavior (in brief, their role behaviors and status perspectives) on the one hand, and on the other, the subjective and personally familiar world of the experiencing individual. The projects of "Psychology 324" will all have this character, namely as an adjunct in personal but objectified terms, to the abstracted generalizations discussed in Psychology 322.

2. None of the courses listed in the current catalogue for Psychology or related fields parallels this new course or overlaps in specific intent or instructional technique. Existing courses focus on reading and familiarizing oneself with the theoretical and experimental literature in specific areas of psychology. When laboratory work is involved, it is either focused on experimental paradigm research or focused on a particular project. None is exclusively and particularly concerned with the carrying out of a program of projects involving a naturalistic methodology. Nevertheless, these other existing courses complement the overall intent of an undergraduate major or concentration in Social Psychology.

3. Consistent with the department's objectives for its undergraduate program development, this new course proposal is part of a longχrange plan to strengthen and substantiate a comprehensive undergraduate program in Social Psychology. In the near future, it is planned that an Introductory course in Social Psychology will be proposed at the 200-level (perhaps "Psychology 222"), followed by a re-organization of the current Psychology 322 course into a more advanced course, perhaps "Special Topics in Social Psychology." Thus, there will be three core courses forming a concentration in Social Psychology: "Psy 222, 322, 324," viz. "Introduction, Special Topics, and Applied Psycholinguistics in Social Psychology. This planned undergraduate concentration in Social Psychology can be used to anticipate the departmentβs graduate program in the Social/Personality Area.

4. This new course is designed as a social science coreχprogram course, and especially for a concentration in the special area of Social Psychology; specifically to go along with the existing Psychology 322 (3). It also has a preχrequisite which includes other core courses with 3 credits. (See also above.)

5. This course entails the review and discussion of projects where class time is spent reviewing, practicing, and learning methods of reporting observations made in naturalistic settings through which the student moves on his daily round. Each project is mandatory instructional assignment which the student must formally submit, then re-submit after the instructor's evaluation. The evidence of student learning and acquisition of skills is to be found objectively in the projects and reports that the student prepares as the work for the course. These project reports have, in our pilot projects, been quite carefully and exhaustively prepared by our students according to standards specified for them and which follow the scientific register in Social Psychology. These projects are original, usable, empirical data and can be examined and used by other students, colleagues, researchers, and even, the public. The projects of the students of "Psychology 324" will thus accumulate over the semesters into a usable Data Bank or UH Archives. This unique and special feature of this course will add greatly to its value and importance demonstrating that undergraduate students are capable of playing a role in the actual production of scientific data. Furthermore, this course takes advantage of the fact that it is a largeχsize class: rather than being a disadvantage, students have the opportunity of maximizing their learning through variable comparison with many others whose daily round circles or community membership varies and more nearly represents the macroχcosm outside.

6. The requirements for teaching this course are the same as those involving Psychology 322, i.e., a thorough familiarity with the field of Social Psychology and with the standard accepted methodologies of the social sciences governing the objectivity of data gathering procedures and the style of reporting. There must also be a willingness on the part of the instructor to forego the lecture-style mode and to be able to function comfortably in a workshop atmosphere with large (200+) groups. Professor James is planning to teach the new course every semester along with members of the Social/Personality Area, current and probably future, are capable of handling this course. In fact, given its empirical character, professors may vie against each other for the opportunity of teaching Psychology 324.

7. Since this is intended as a large, service course it will add to the department's capacity to handle the increasing student load. Currently, the Psych-logy Department is carrying out steps to reorganize its offerings of advanced quality courses at the undergraduate level, particularly its major and Honor's program. The intent is to try to cut the size of these advancedχquality courses. This is possible, in the present case of the new "Psychology 324" inasmuch as it incorporates individualized projects and reports into an exchange plan where students profit from the others:
the more the better, restricted only by the size of the classroom.

8. This new course has not been offered before, but as indicated above, the method has been piloted under the framework of Psychology 322. The success of the method is readily evidenced by examining the projects in our files, available upon request.


Applied Psycholinguistics in Social Psychology

I. Projects Relating to the Nature and Character of Talk

 

II. Projects Relating to Cataloguing-Practices on the Daily Round Projects Relating to Objectifying Personal Experience



Brief Notes

I. The projects related to the nature of talk are designed to familiarize you with (a) the functional components or "units of talk" (e.g., utterances, displays, arguments, claims, positioning, moves, etc.: these being events that occur in talking), and (b) the setting features that form a context for the occurrence of events in talking and to which these events are related or connected through socialization and assimilation practices of the community.

 

IA. Situationally Located Talk (Student prepares tape recordings and transcriptions of portions thereof; analyzes transcripts and writes up report.)

 

lB. Bandscript Analysis (Student makes a microχanalysis of a small segment of a tape recording using stopwatch; records length of displays and silences; analyzes interχrelationships through graphic and notational transformations (e.g., charts and statistical comparisons).

 

Topicalization Dynamics (Student analyzes a segment of discourse text (reading material or transcript of talk) and breaks it down into its "ARGUMENT COMPONENTS" according to techniques of analysis practiced in class (e.g., in ethnosemantics, applied tools exist: Color Coded Wisdom; ES-Probe Technique for Investigating Topic Domain Fragmentation; these techniques are practiced in class and students in the past have quickly learned to use their own knowledge to innovate specific applications).

 

II. The projects relating to cataloguing-practices on the daily round are designed to bring you to the realization that experiencing is a culturally given medium (see "enculturation/socialization/assimilation/standardization") and therefore, experiencing includes the process of designing experiences. Students keep track and tabulate events and occurrences on their daily round. The Daily Round character of an individual is a function of his schedule and of the circles or locales through which he moves. Students compare, contrast, and annotate each others' reports and write up their findings within the focus of "What is ETHNICITY? How is it characterized through contrastive analyses of records of students who move various socioχethnographic circles (see "family background, neighborhood character, value expressions, behavioral rituals," etc.).

 

The projects relating to objectifying personal experience are designed to give you practice in preparing objectified and theoretically oriented models, schemas, and paradigms in Social Psychology and in Ethnosemantics (e.g., Conceptual Arrays, Glossaries, Charts, Formal Notations, Contrastive Distributional Analysis, and the like, which are methods that will be practiced in class. Thus, for example, one project piloted this semester, involves students going into the ocean every day for two weeks and carrying out a series of observational exercises in which they report the ontological steps of their acclimatization to the new medium in specified categories:

fears, imaginings, skills, routines, innovations, sensations, movement characteristics, interpersonal exchanges in the water, etc. These are then presented and analyzed in an overall report at the end of the two weeks. Other examples include the micro-description of interactional exchanges of brief duration (e.g., a handshake).

 

Student grades will be assigned after each project report has been (a) submitted, and (b) resubmitted following instructor evaluation. Pre requisite: Psychology 322 or any other course in Psychology (except Psy 100 and 110) that deals with theoretical and experimental literature in learning, personality, or development).


 

BACK TO INDEX