Danell Saito's Lab Report File, Psychology 459

Bill the Cat.  (picture) Danell's Lab Reports

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BOX Danell's Home Page

BOX Danell's Glossary

BOX Danell's Topical Index File

BOX Dr. Leon James Home Page

BOX Other people's lab reports

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BOXMy e-mail address: danell@uhunix.uhcc.hawaii.edu

(Note: Lab Reports 1a, 1b, and 1c are not done because they were accidentally erased earlier in the semester)
BOX Lab Report 1a

BOX Lab Report 1b

BOX Lab Report 1c

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Week 4 Homework


BOX Searching
For a long time I didn't even know that there was something available to help me find specific information. What I used to do was to scroll down or up the file I was looking in. You can guess how much time that took up. Now all I have to do is type "/" and the key words I'm interested in. Thank you Dr. James for introducing this to us (it was about time too!!-happy face). Just your home page alone would take me a half an hour to read and find the things I need to know.

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BOX Navigation
When I first started going through all of the files for this class I was really lost. So lost sometimes that I would give up and leave the computer lab totally frustrated and pissed off. I had to force myself to go back and get the hang of it. When I sat down and really concentrated on where I was going and how I was getting there it turned out to be pretty simple. I usually start off on my home page and start exploring from there. I found out that just my home page alone can take me very far. I don't usually use the control commands. I like to use the arrow keys instead. That way I have a chance to see exactly how I got to someplace if I need to go there again. Take a look at Barry Kwock's comments.

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BOX Pessimism and Depression
I was a perfect model for these words when I first started out on the internet. I had similar feelings as Tod Takitani did when the frustration got so bad that the thought of withdrawing from this class seemed like the best choice. I had to tell myself that the information that I'm learning is going to be very valuable some day and that it will put me in front of someone when I go out in the real world and look for a job. Another thing that helped me alot was to see that other people were having the exact same problems I was. What I had to do to keep myself from giving up was to constantly tell myself that if I try hard enough I will eventually understand what the *beep* is going on. I especially had to work at this when I accidently erased all of my files. Can you imagine how frustrating that is? Then I went to see Mr. Eric Hagen and he saved me. He was really helpful. He got me started again by recreating all of my files (but my data was all lost so I still had to start all over, that's why I don't have anything under lab reports 1 a, b, and c). He even showed me how to put some neat grapics in my reports (that's what the "Bill the Cat. (picture)" and "BOX" things are). If you look at my report in Netscape you'll be able to see them. They're really cool. Another thing that he did for me was to create a backup file for me. All I have to do is type "backup" at the prompt and my files get saved into a separate file that I cannot erase. If you have a chance you should go and talk to him. He's really nice and helpful. Don't be surprised, though, if he says alot of things that just go way over your head. He really knows what he's doing and kind of expects everyone else to know too.

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BOX Getting Lost
Getting lost while doing my work in emacs seems to be my forte. I constantly have to go back and look at my notes to see where I went wrong, both for my links and for my anchors. Alot of the times its for things that I thought I had gotten down because of how often I do them, but its always something very small that throws everything off. One of the things that really bugs me is that I think that I have saved something and I come back to next day and it's gone. Also, being constantly kicked off while loged on really throws me. Here I am typing away and all of sudden the system has shut down on me (sometimes without me even realizing it). I think that when this class is done every single one of us should receive a medal or something proving that we survived this class and all of its psychological stress.

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Week 5 Homework


BOX Comments on Generational Curriculum Paper
BOX To see comments on another Generational Curriculum Paper click here.
I don't remember the name of the person that wrote the paper, but I do remember that it was a female. From her paper on her modification of her driving persona=anchor, titled "Prelude to Self Witnessing Report," she learned three things. (1) That is important for her to view driving as both pleasant and fun. She used to think of driving as a chore, that it had to be done in order to get to someplace she desired to go. She realized that driving actually can be a rewarding and peaceful period during her day. Hence (2), she learned to view driving as a form of relaxation, a way to relax and take a break from daily hassles. A time when she can be alone and not be bothered by anyone or anything else. She can sing out loud if she wants and no one will tell her that she is off key, she can be grouchy if she wants and no one will tell her to smile. (3) The most important thing she learned from taking this class was that there are many different ways that she can harm someone by her driving, not just physically. Some of these ways include emotionallly, morally, and spiritually. She feels that all of these types of harm are just as bad, if not worse, than harming someone physically.

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BOX Everyone has to learn how to better their driving
Her opinion (state of mind) through out all of the papers was one of real pessimism. She felt that everyone else, not just her, needed to learn how to better their driving abilities. She gives several examples of ways that the entire population could benefit from the improvement of drivers on the roads. One way she proposed to do this was through testing. She said that if everyone took a personality test when they took the test or re-test for their drivers license, we would have a documented history of people's personalities. So when they committed a driving offense, we know what type of personality traits they have and can send them to counseling so they can "conform to a better driver." Another way was to implement driver education programs through out a childs education, from elementary to high school. She feels that since the driver's education programs now are only provided for short periods of time, this implies that extensive preparation in not necessary for driving. She states that there a certain periods during which certain events should take place for proper development to occur, and that driving is no exception, after all the children are the future drivers. Another suggestion she had, and this one is my favorite, is that "the solution to a major social problem may depend on all drivers being more like women drivers." Isn't that great?! She believes this because men are aggressive drivers whereas women are defensive drivers, which in turn makes men opportunistic and women to be responsible drivers.

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BOX What I Learned
What I learned from reading this persons papers was that driving should not be taked for granted. Lots of people don't even have cars to get around in. So why am I grumbling. Even though I live in Hawaii and my car has no air conditioning, no power stering, is standard transmission, and has a pretty out dated stereo. I should be lucky that I don't have to catch the bus all over the place (if I had to do that I would probably never leave my house!). I also learned that in order to for me to stop viewing driving as a hassle, I have to totally change my feelings about everything associated with driving. Dr. James has a lot of work cut out for him wth me. Jo Allen also learned, from reading her General Cirriculum Paper, how being patient and calm while driving will lead to better driving experiences. She also extends this knowledge to other aspects of her life; for example, while on the computer. To take a look at more comments about this click here.

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BOX A Vicious Cycle
My attitude while driving has gotten really bad within the last two years. It seems as though everyone else's on the road has changed too. Maybe its a trend Hawaii is going through. That article from the newspaper about the Aloha in driving has disappeared was really accurate. When ever I'm driving (which is alot because I live in Mililani and come into town 7 days a week, sometimes twice a day) there are always other drivers on the road that don't seem to have any regard for the other drivers on the road, the over-confident driver phenomenon. Almost no one lets a person in a lane when they have their signal on, its easier to cut in front of someone that isn't paying attention than to wait until some person lets you in. Those are some of my pet peeves that really seem to bother me when I'm driving. (Take a look at Joleen Lai's comments on the Generational Cirruculum Paper she got for a better understanding of frustration while driving). So much so that I start swearing and driving recklessly because I'm so frustrated and angry. Caroline Balatico states that she also experiences this type of emotionally charged driving behavior. I'm sure everyone who drives goes through this. That's one of the reasons why I feel that in order for any one person to change their driving personality, the whole population has to change theirs also (is that pessimistic or what?). I say this because if that one person changes her personality but the other drivers on the road don't change theirs, how will that help. The reformed driver will start to get upset again at the other drivers and will wind up doing all of the things she used to do before the change. As with everything else in this world, it's an endless, sometimes vicious, cycle. For additional comments see Michelle Ota's and Alison Asahina's report.

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Week 6 Homework


BOX The WebCrawler
I found my three "hot links" by using the WebCrawler. I tried to use to other search tools found on Dr. James Comments File, but it was too confusing (so what's new?1?). To use to WebCrawler I just had to link to the WebCrawler's homepage by using Dr. James' Homepage, arrowed down to the place where it says to enter your search word, arrowed down to the 'search' instruction and started my searching from the choices given to me. Most of the choices available were stuff about traffic on the Internet. I chose to stick to traffic on the highways and freeways of motorists or bicyclists.

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BOX Automobile Safety Foundation
This link was basically about the auto-steering locking mechanisms in cars today. The Automobile Safety Foundation wanted to warn car owners about the possible dangers associated with this mechanism. They said that the auto steering locks put on the cars, as far back as the 1970's, were designed to be an anti-theft device. It didn't work. They also warn motorists about the possible "inadvertent lock-up" of the locking mechanism. Since this mechanism was installed in cars they have had numerous reports of "property damage, serious injuries and fatalities" from inadvertent lock up accidents. The auto lock mechanism is still being manufactured into some cars today and the Automobile Safety Foundation wants everyone to know about it.

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BOX Upcoming Public Meetings Relevant to Bicycling
This link is about the San Francisco Parking and Traffic & the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition getting together to input ideas into the plan to make their city a little more bicycle friendly. They discuss two meetings they are going to have. The first one involves discussions on the proposed route network (where the lanes, paths and signs are to be posted). The second one involves the other elements of the plan, including education, enforcement, promotion, and legislation. Within the file they used the words "bike priority street." I though this was a great concept. I know how scary it can be riding a bike with cars whizzing by you on both sides. They also talked about a variety of tactics to promote safe bicycling: (1) placement of "Share the Road" signs, (2) striping of bike lanes, (3) "traffic calming" which slows down traffic using speed humps, barriers, and pedestrian amenities, and (4) the development of "bicycle boulevards", this is a street where traffic is slowed and bicyclists enjoy the right-of-way at intersections. Now if only they would do this for Hawaii and all of the other states.

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BOX Colorado DUI Law
Someone was nice enough to let the world know that the Colorado DUI Law was changed. He or she states that if your BAC (Blood Alcohol Concentration) level is between 0.05% and 0.10% BAC you are considered driving while alcohol impaired and given a ticket which puts 8 points on your driving abstract. If you're BAC level is above 0.10%, it's considered a DUI and your drivers license is revoked for 3 months with no chance for a permit and 12 points go on your driving abstract. The person goes on to say how a BAC works, how your physical as well as psychological states can influence it.

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Week 7 Homework

BOX Links and Comments on Other Student's Reports
BOX Kendall Matsuyoshi: What I found interesting in Kendall's report was his comment on having to trust the other people on the road. When you think about it, you put your life in the hands of the other driver's around you everytime you get into your car. I guess that's why there are so many personal injury lawyers around. Not everyone drives like they are supposed to. Just the other week, a high school kid wrapped his Mercedes around a tree because he was speeding in a residential area. The boy didn't make it. I think he had a passenger in the car with him that did survive the accident. Very scary, huh.

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BOX Diane Beauchemin: Diane found an interesting article which commented on how pollutive cars are in our society. This person feels that if everyone got out of their cars and rode bicycles or walked instead, the world would be a safer place for everyone. This comment made sense to me, but I can't help but conjure up an image of bicycles and pedestrians all over the road, weaving in and out of each other, like you see in the movies of those foreign places. It seems to be pure chaos. My frind went to Vietnam once, where the amount of bicyclists and pedestrians out number the amount of cars on the road, and she said that to her it looked like everyone was going to hit her when she was walking on the road or sidewalk. Or if they weren't going to run into her, they were going to collide with each other. But she talked to her relatives and they said that it much like driving. Everyone knows what to do, where to go, how to react, and how to avoid collision. There is a system that everyone follows so that it is not total chaos. It all looks so confusing. Can you imagine how many bicycles there would be on the road if this were to happen?

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BOX Adele Kimura: Adele made a good point when she stated that we shouldn't concentrate so much on changing others. She feels that to do this is extremely selfish and self-serving. Up until now my attitude has been if the other people on the road don't change, or even try to change, why should I. (Refer to my Vicious Cycle paragraph). She made me realize that even if the other drivers on the road don't change, that shouldn't stop me from becoming a better driver (meaning a safer, more altruistic driver). To try and change someone to become a better driver would be like trying to get someone to quit smoking (assuming that they did smoke, of course). Anyway, it's not our responsibility to try and convert someone into something s/he is not.

I've had many conversations with my boyfriend on this topic. It has to do with one of my friends. She is not a really considerate person when it comes to other people beside herself. It used to really bother me because I would go out of my way to do things for her and she would do nothing in return. I would bitch to Glen (that's my boyfriend) and he would tell me not to worry so much about it because that's just the way she is. He said that you can't try to change someone just because you don't like the way that person acts or thinks. You can't expect for everyone to act and think the way you do. If you try to change that person into someone that you want them to be, you're being selfish. I took his advice and I'm trying to not let her actions affect my actions. It's not very easy. I think the same can be said for driving. It happens to me all the time. If someone cuts me off on the freeway, I do my best to try and cut them off the next chance I get. I realized that I'm doing exactly what they are doing. If I let someone else's driving affect my driving, I'm no better than they are. Even though I realize this, acting on it so much harder.

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BOX Todd Takitani: Todd comments on how convenient cabs are for him. He says that they are a safer mode of transportation. I do not agree. There are many times when I'm driving and I see cab drivers weaving in and out of traffic, cutting people off, squeezing their way into tiny little spaces where they do not belong, and generally being a hazard and a nuisance on the road. My boyfriend and I have this thing where we try to cut off any cab we see on the road, just to give them a taste of their own medicine. I think cab drivers have this mentallity, as Todd put it, that they can go anywhere they want to go. This, in turn, makes them think that they can then drive any way that they want to. I am not disagreeing with Todd totally. I realize that they are much needed mode of transportation for many people. When I travel to different places I make full use of cabs. All I'm trying to say is that, although they may be well experienced drivers from being on road all the time, they are not invincible as many of them think they are. I once saw a cab being pullled over by a police officer for speeding on the freeway. The driver even had a person (fare) in the car with him.

By the way, this has no reflection upon Todd's character, in any way. I think he's a great guy, even though he chooses to use taxi cabs (ha ha ha, joke). Sorry Todd, I know this isn't really a retraction but my opinion on cab drivers hasn't changed. If I offended any cab drivers out there, my apologies.

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BOX Rayson Noguchi-From reading Rayson's report about driving in packs, (to see a definition of convoys click here) I get the feeling that I am some what abnormal. I say this because I don't like driving in packs of cars. When I do I feel cramped in. When ever possible I like to pull ahead of the pack and cruise in between the pack in front of me and the pack in back of me. Does that mean I'm anti-social? I hope not. Anyway, Rayson commented that while driving he noticed that other drivers don't like to drive side by side each other. I have to agree with that one. For me I think it's because if I'm driving side by side with someone, my freedom to change lanes whenever the need or want arises is impaired. Also, because I don't like people watching me (maybe I'm picking my nose or something, how rude of them to stare, right?).

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BOX Nicole Yoshimitsu: In her report, Nicole talks about the elderly and their ability to drive safely. Safety pertaining both to themselves and others on the road. I chose to comment on this because just the other week my grandfather came over and he had a new (meaning there are others on his car from before this incident) dent on his truck. He drives a big truck because he hauls his fishing boat all over the island. I sometimes think that his truck is too big for him because, first of all, he has a hard time climbing into it sometimes (when his arthritis is acting up), and second, he has a hard time judging where something is in relation to his truck. That's why he had a new dent in his truck this time, he backed into a pole in a parking lot he was at. When I first saw this dent I was laughing because I thought it was pretty funny. Now that I think about it, it's pretty scary. I know that my grandpa needs his truck, but what if it had been a person or a car behind him. My grandmother is his co-pilot whenever she goes somewhere with him, but both of them are getting on in years. I'm not saying that my grandpa is a bad driver, whenever I ride with him anywhere I feel totally safe with him driving. I think it would be unconstitutional to deny a person their driver's license because of their age, but if we implimented a test, like Nicole suggested, to measure a person reflexes and they don't pass, then maybe the right thing to do would be to deny them their license.

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SMILE Comments on Dr. James' Instructor's Article
BOX Class Discussions Section:
In one paragraph of this section Dr. James refers to a book by Kahlthau. He said that this book helped the students "by explicitly and openly raising affective issues, the book helped the students get over their emotional disturbance during the initial phase of learning Internet, when uncertainty, confusion, and fear become the affective context for the learning." Let me tell you about uncertainty, confusion, and fear (and don't forget frustration). Those were the main feelings I had, and still have to this day, about using the Internet. Even though I still have these feelings, they aren't so intense as they used to be. If only we had a book like this to refer to at the beginning of this semester. Even though it would have meant more work for us, I sure would have appreciated a boost like that.

BOX Inventory Section:
In this section Dr. James' states "...a desire for mastering Internet. When this motive is present, it functions as a source of intense feelings of self-satisfaction." I have learned that this statement in true. I say "learned" because at the beginning I had no desire to master the Internet. My main motivation was a decent grade for this class (is that honesty or what?). As I got better and better, I found that I actually looked forward to spending time on the computer and creating and formatting my pages. When I was done for the day I looked at what I had done and felt good.

BOX Mastery Section (5)
In this section "Having Motivation for Task-Completion on Internet," he quotes a person being nervous about proceeding ahead after s/he was done with e-mail. That's exactly how I used to feel. I used to compose extra long messages in e-mail to my friend in Oregon just so I wouldn't have to work in Lynx. Talk about procrastination. Now I zoom through e-mail because I have been thinking about what I want to do in Lynx, I have all these ideas about what I want to write, and I want to get them done. BUT, there are always those moments when something goes wrong and all the old feelings come roaring back to me. It's not very comfortable, you know what I mean?!?

BOX Expectations Section (11):
This section, titled "Identifying One's Problems on Internet," also struck home for me. A student writes "I spent over 1 hour figuring why I could not get the information to print. I tried all options with no success." Many times I have spent long periods of time trying to figure out why one thing went wrong. It's mind boggling sometimes. I want to know what went wrong, or more specifically what I did wrong, so that I don't do it again. I don't always accomplish that, though, and have done the same thing wrong again later. I then go through the procedure of again trying to figure out exactly what went wrong. Now that's frustrating. I'm down to very few strands of hair on my head from pulling them all the time that happens.

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Week 8 Homework

SMILE Links and Comments on the Students of PSY 409
BOX Diane Beauchemin: I know that I just commented on Diane's report, but after reading her PSY 409 lab report I had to do it again. Her optimism and style of laughing in the face of disaster really motivate me. Her lab reports are entertaining yet informative. I admire her for being able to make light of something that is totally frustrating and stress provoking. Thanks Diane for making me laugh just when I needed it the most.

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BOX Carol Alamares:
Carol gives some really good advice. I can't remember how many times I've been working at home on my modem and I get cut off. Most times I don't even notice that the system has cut me off and I just keep typing away. Thank goodness for M-x recover. I think that they sould give some warning as to when your time is running out. They have to realize that people do get preoccupied and lose track of time while on the system. And I'm not too happy with the 90 minutes either. I don't understand why they can't make it longer. You can't get very much done in only an hour and a half (I can't anyway).

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BOX Grant Harada
The experience Grant had with his friend is similar to mine. My friends used to comstantly ask me when is the next time that I'm going to go out with them. My boyfriend is constantly complaining that we never do anything anymore. There just aren't enough hours in the day for this class. Although it may not look like it, I spend a lot of time on the computer typing up my labreport. All my friends call me "Nerd" now because they say all I ever do is study. I know they don't really get mad at me, but they now know not to ask me to go out with them because the answer is always "I can't, I have to study." My boyfriend asks me "so, what are we going to do tonight/this weekend?" I tell him I have use the computer tonight/all weekend. It's now the story of my life. P.S. I have 4 other classes that I have to somehow study for in between all this computer time also. (Thanks for listening to my moaning and groaning folks.)

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BOX Linda Wong:
Linda talks about the question that was posed to us: "Do you get lost?" Like her, I also feel that I started out lost. In the beginning of this semester, when class would meet every Thursday, I would feel like I had missed a class (when in fact I hadn't). Everyone seemed to be talking about things that were foreign to me. As the weeks went by, and this kept happening, I felt more lost then ever. After a while I finally broke down (risking my self-esteem) and asked a fellow classmate what everyone was talking about. As it turned out, I knew exactly what they were talking about (most of the time) but just had the terminology mixed up in my head. Boy, what a relief to find out I wasn't that ignorant after all.

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BOX Joleen Lai:
Joleen makes an excellent point when she says that everything is becoming computerized. That's one of the main reasons that I didn't drop this class when my frustration level was so high. I figure that I can use the knowledge I'm gaining in this class later in life. Before I took this class I thought that I was pretty computer literate. Boy did I get a wake up call. I had no idea about what the information superhighway was actually about. I thought it was just an extensive e-mail system. The possibilities are stagering. Have you ever seen those AT&T commercials about all the new inventions they are working on regarding computers. It's amazing, not to mention intimidating.

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BOX Cheryl Remata:
Cheryl talks about asking for help when you encounter a problem. She says that if you can't solve a problem by yourself, don't get stuck trying to figure it out. There's no shame in asking for help, especially your fellow classmates. I used to sit at the computer for hours at a time just trying to figure out what the problem was. I didn't ask for help because I felt that if I did I would just be bothering the lab attendants or my classmates. I realized that was a big mistake (a little late in the semester I might add). Because of that I fell way behind in my labreports. Sometimes the solution to the problem was so far off from what I thought was wrong. I wasted tons of time doing this, and I'm paying for it now. So take her advice, ask for help.

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SMILE Links to the Instructor's Weekly Comments File
BOX Link here to go to the Instructor's Weekly Comments FileBOX
BOX Logon Problems
Well, the last time I tried to use to computer from my house to write this report I ended up not getting anything done. I had to wait about 20 minutes for a connection (and I don't have the luxury of having two computers to work from) and when I did make a connection the system kicked me off three times. By the time I finally got a "good" connection I had to get off the system anyway to go to work. It's all very frustrating, especially when I'm behind and with the deadline Dr. James' gave us for everything to be done. Talk about pressure.

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BOX Comments by Higa
One of the things that I did not learn early enough was to constantly take notes while on the computer. I know that Dr. James' was constantly telling us do this, but I didn't really see the need at the time. I finally figured out how much time I would save if I did take notes. I wouldn't have to keep going back to my anchors and links to see exactly how I did them, I wouldn't have to try and memorize what file and/or anchors were used in other people's lab reports. And when I did the unthinkable and accidently erased all my files I had to start all over and try to remember/figure out how to make all the links and anchors again. Take his advice and keep really good notes through out the semester.

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Week 9 Homework

SMILE Part 1: Traffic Psychology and Driving Personality Makeover

BOX Concept of Driving Personality Makeover
From reading Dr. James' article on traffic psychology and all the different things involved in accomplishing a driving personality makeover, I'd say that for an ordinary lay person reading this stuff, it would be too complicated to understand. That was pretty much how I felt. Even after many discussions in class about this very topic, it still slightly confusing. Click here to see a definition of traffic psychology.

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I think that in order to accomplish a complete makeover of a person's driving personality, that person would first have to define what type of personality they would like to change over to. It's not going to be the same for everyone. We all have different ideas about what is a good or bad driver.

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After that person has decided what type of driving personality she would like to have, the makeover can begin. This is where to work comes in. She will have to note all of the bad things that she does while driving, and work at changing them. This includes not only the physical aspect of driving but also the thoughts and feelings while driving and about driving. In other words a whole attitude adjustment is required. Only then can the person start to see changes for the "better" when she drives.

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BOX Any Relation to Traffic Psychology?
I think that the concept of a driving personality makeover is directly related to Traffic Psychology(click there to see a definition). Or rather that a makeover is what traffic psychology is about. It enables us to see exactly what it is that we have to change, it labels our behaviors and personalities for us so that we can better understand ourselves and our driving. It also identifies situations that can predict what we are going to do when encountering these situations and can help us to change or modify these reactions. What is a driving personality makeover without traffic psychology (or vice versa)?

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BOX Making Driving a Pleasant, Worthwhile, and Peaceful Experience
The following is a paper that we had to turn in to Dr. James. This answer the next few questions asked of us in this homework assignment. What I Think is a Good Driver, How I Rate Myself, and How I Would Engineer a Driving Personality Makeover for Myself

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For me, driving is viewed as a stressful experience. It seems like every time I'm on the road, which is a lot, something happens that makes me feel high levels of anxiety. The things that provoke these feelings ranges from ordinary stop and go traffic on the freeways, someone cutting in front of me when there is ample room behind me, or a simple traffic light. Despite these feeling of anxiety, driving is still my transportation of choice. This is only because I live in Mililani (about 25-30 minutes from town with no traffic) and catching the bus is unbearable to me (I did that for about 3 months). Being that I'm on the road so much, I think that improving my attitude toward driving will lift a great burden off my psychological shoulders.

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I think that main thing that would make driving for me a pleasant, worthwhile, and peaceful activity is if everyone, including myself, developed a better sense of respect for others on the road. Now days, it seems like it's every man-car for themselves. No one seems to stop and think about how our driving will affect other people on the road. The only thing that matters is ourselves, if we get to work/school on time or if we can out maneuver one another to prove who is the "better" driver. If we all took a little time out to realize how dangerous and silly we can be while driving, I think the roads would be a safer and more enjoyable place to be.

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One other thing that would make a difference for me would be a new car. My car is pushing 14 years right now and is not in any way a luxury car. Comfort while driving is very minimal. I have no air conditioning (only an air vent that blows warm air on me), an extremely out dated stereo, no power steering (or power anything for that matter), and standard transmission (which I don't mind compared to all the other things). I know that it sounds really materialistic, but it really seems to matter, especially since I'm in my car at least an hour everyday of my life.

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On the psychological side, since I experience such high levels of anxiety majority of the time I'm driving, my expectations have made me become an offensive driver (does that sound backwards?). Instead of waiting to be cut in front of, I don't give anyone a chance of experiencing the "sucking in phenomenon." I drive so offensively (aggressively) sometimes that I scare myself and work myself into a bigger frenzy than if I had just driven "normally" (e.g., relaxed). If I force myself to take it easy, relax, enjoy the scenery, and not let anybody else's driving bother me, I find that I don't experience as much anxiety (and this works only sometimes, most times I give up and just go with the flow of my emotions). Maybe if I worked at it harder, allowed more time to get to my destination, and bought a new car my outlook on driving wouldn't be so grim.

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Just because I realize these things doesn't make it any easier to accomplish. The human species seems to be resistant to change in any shape or form. Changing my driving personality seems to be the biggest challenge for me (that and trying to quit smoking, both extremely mind boggling!). For example, when I drive home from work, usually late at night, I still find myself rushing. There may be only a handful of cars on the road with me but the anxiety is still there. Repeatedly telling myself to control my driving behavior only works for short periods of time because I go on auto-pilot a lot. And that auto-pilot is usually late for work or school. Even if I was successful in my makeover I think I would get fed up and revert to my old habits because everyone else on the road with me has not changed. (Take a look at this paragraph for more on this topic.) I'm not saying that I cannot be coverted for good. Who knows, maybe I can. But until that day comes I will keep trying. And I still have a ways to go.

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SMILE Part 2: Comments on Dr. James' Article on Driving Behavior
BOX Click here to see Dr. James' article on driving behavior

BOX Automatization of Driving Behavior
In the section Automatization of Driving Behavior, Dr. James' discusses how we are able to do many things while driving, for example: holding a conversation. It shows that we are not really thinking about our driving behavior, but just doing what we are used to. Dr. James' goes on to say that driving is one of the most complex tasks that humans are capable are doing. He proves it's complex by stating statistics on the nations driving record: 3 million accidents are reported a year (meaning there are many more that actually happen but don't get reported to the authorities); 50,000 deaths and hundreds of thousands of serious injuries occur each year because of automobile related accidents. Pretty scary, huh. But very easy to believe. Just today I saw two pretty serious looking accidents (the aftermath of the accidents) within 10 minutes of each other on the same street. You can imagine the traffic jam that caused. I have been pretty lucky in that I have never been in a serious accident before, while driving or as a passenger, only one fender bender (if you could even call it that because both cars had no scratches or dents in them). I need to knock on some wood right now...I don't think that I will go through my whole life without being involved somehow in an accident. It's bound to happen someday, later rather than sooner I hope.

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BOX Allowing Passengers to Complain or Make Suggestions
This is probably the most irritating thing a passenger could do while a person is driving. It not only distracts the driver even more from concentrating on driving but it also causes more feelings of stress and anxiety in the driver. No one likes to be criticized about their driving, no one. It's like a taboo subject (while talking to the person you're criticizing) to people. Although we may realize that it's constructive criticism and may help us better our driving behavior and attitudes, it makes it no less harder to accept. I think we have to come to those realizations ourselves, though sometimes it may be too late. I wonder why it is that we don't like to be criticized about our driving. I can handle criticism about most other things (looks, paper writing skills, or athletic abilities) but not about my driving. Uh huh, don't even go there!
BOX See also my definition of Back-Seat Drivers.

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Week 10 Homework

SMILE Dynamics of Traffic Convoys
BOX Self-Witnessing Observations
While forcing myself to drive within a convoy of cars on the highway, I found that while it may be safer from laser tagging cops, the imminent danger from surrounding cars is present. I say this because with more cars around you, there are more chances that there will be someone in your blind spot. Not everyone double checks their decisions to change lanes. Also, with more cars around you, the chances of some other driver wanting to occupy the same space you are occupying or want to occupy when you change lanes is greater. How many times have you seen cars in front of you trying to merge into one lane at the same time?
I also noticed that I really don't like driving with a whole bunch of cars around me. Maybe it's a privacy thing, or maybe it's because I don't like to be held back from going the speed that I want to go by other cars. Additional comments about convoys made above.

BOX Implications for Traffic Psychology
I think that no matter what people say about convoys there will always be people who drive in them, people who make them, and people who avoid them. As is usually the case, it comes down to individuality. If you drive better or feel safer in a convoy you will seek out those situations, and vice versa if you don't. I also think that people drive according to their preference unconsciously, most of the time.

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Week 11 Homework

SMILE Comments on Generational Curriculum Paper #2

BOX Annotated Bibliography for my Personality in Traffic: Finding my Personality and Driving Behavior
Rie Uchijima, the author of this paper, mainly discussed how he went about finding his information at the library. Here are the main points that were discussed pertaining to traffic psychology:

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BOX Paper #1: major components of Type A personality pattern are said to be a chronic sense of time urgency and impatience; these components are then extended to this type of persons driving personality; people exhibiting Type A personalities tend to receive more tickets for driving violations and are involved in more accidents compared to those people who score lower on the Type A personality scale.

BOX Paper #2: the study found that Type A individuals are more likely to feel stressed while driving compared to Type B individuals; this may occur because the Type A individual seeks out stressful situations.

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BOX Paper #3: this study showed the perceptions of the prevalence of certain driving errors and violations of other driver; drivers who reported that they regularly commit these errors and violations made larger estimates of the percentage of the other road users that they thought were committing these violations. See my definition of Modeling Perspective for a broader understanding of this.

BOX Paper #4: drivers usually misinterpret information from other drivers' traffic behaviors; the author explained his running of yellow traffic lights as he thought the other drivers behind him wants to run the yellow light.

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BOX Paper #5: this article states that younger drivers are statistically more accident liable compared to the older and statistically safer drivers.

BOX Paper #6: this article shows that safety authorities may mitigate the effect of variable error of driving by decreasing the variability of the driving environment; for example, by decreasing the number of stop signs in a neighborhood, a driver will be more likely to stop at the stop sign. Click here to see definition of Subjective Value of Driving.

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BOX Paper #7: this study assessed the ability of the theory of planned behavior to account for a drivers intentions to commit four specific driving violations: drinking and driving, speeding, close following, and overtaking in risky circumstances; it showed that the perceived behavioral control of the situation led to significant increases in the amount of times any of these driving patterns occured.

BOX Paper #8: this newspaper article discussed the driving patterns of young man who is categorized as Type A personality; the man states that the highway is a great place for the shadow to come out, where otherwise well-behaved people liberate their hostility and aggression.

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BOX Paper #9: this book stated that most of the accidents that occur at night are from drinking, driving, and speeding; people tend to be more aggressive and think about resposibility less while driving at night.

BOX Paper #10: this article talked about driving the wrong way down a one way street; some factors that influence this type of driving are intentionality and unintentionality.

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BOX I don't know if you can tell but reading this persons paper was extremely diffucult. I think he's a foreign student. The things that he found were really interesting. I especially like Paper #8. I see this type of behavior everytime I get into the car with my boyfriend. He becomes a whole different person whenhe drives. He's very aggressive, hogs the whole road, weaves in and out of different lanes all the time, and has some really close calls sometimes. I sometimes have to tell him to calm down because he gets all worked about such little things, it's kind of scary, like a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

By reading this persons papers I think that he really got to understand his driving personality. He pretty much chose articles that reflected his driving in some sort of way. If anything, he can at least put labels to his different driving habits and then from there work on ways to improve his driving behaviors.

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Week 12 Homework

SMILE Tailgating: Legal, Moral, and Spiritual Issues

BOX Tailgating:
I consider someone to be tailgating me when they are purposely driving close behind me. I included purposely because there has to be the intent of driving too close to someone, for the purpose of getting them to drive faster, move out of the way, or just to irritate them. When you're driving in stop of go traffic everyone is driving close together (Accordian effect). You don't become upset at that person when they are driving close to you then. I usually become upset when there is a good flow of treaffic and a car comes speeding up behind me and rides really close, dangerously close. That really makes me mad. But I have to admit that I do that also, not much though, only when I'm in a real big hurry, like late for a test or something. I know that having an excuse like that doesn't make it right.

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BOX Legal Issue of Tailgating
Driving to close behind someone is considered illegal. My friend (a cop) told me that you're supposed to drive 2-3 seconds behind the person in front of you. To count that, he explained, when you pass something on the road, like a sign or something that's not moving, as soon as you pass it, you start counting one-one-thousand, two-one-thousand, .... That's how you figure out how close you are to someone in front of you. He also told me that they are supposed to give out tickets for people following to closely, but rarely does he do it. When you think about it, it is pretty ridiculous. What if you were in traffic that was moving very slowly. How are you supposed to maintain 2-3 seconds between yourself and the car in front of you. You would never get anywhere because all the other drivers would just keep cutting in front of you (the sucking-in phenomenon). I think that it sould be enforced when the person taigating another person is putting themselves and that person in danger.

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BOX Moral Issue of Tailgating
This issue, I think deals with the danger of tailgating. When a person is tailgating you, he is putting both you, himself, and the other drivers around you in danger. What would happen if you had to slam on you brakes all of a sudden. With that guy tailgating you, he probably won't have enough time or space to stop in time. The possibility of an accident happening is greater than if he had not been following you so close. Shouldn't people realize this when driving? I know it's hard to think of moral issues or dangerous situations while driving. I sometimes feel like my car is like a barrier protecting me from everything that is going on and could happen while driving. You don't realize the magmitude of the possible dangers around you. Click here for more comments about the dangers of driving.

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BOX Spiritual Issue of Tailgating
Dr. James' talk about the spiritual implications of driving behavior. What he meant by this was "the subtle connectedness of traffic users." I took this to mean how drivers relate or feel about other drivers on the road with them. When you tailgate, this spiritual connectedness takes on a darkness, so to speak. People do not like to be tailgated and react accordingly. This, in turn, causes them to drive in ways not normal to them (see here for definition of subjective value of driving). Several people in class have said that when someone is tailgating them they either slow down to piss him off or they give him the "bird" to show that they don't like what he's doing. I myself do this quite regularly (slowing down, not giving the "bird" unless in extreme circumstances, you never know what the other person might do). It has become so that it is something that does not phase me anymore. I still ask myself why people have to drive that way, but I never come up with any answers, so I just let it go. Even though I do tailgate other drives, when I catch myself doing it, I make myself stop (most of the time, unless they are driving really slow in the fast lane-left lane). From this class I have learned to put myself into the other drivers shoes and try to think how my driving is making them feel. I think that is what it means to be spiritually connected to someone.

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Week 13 Homework

SMILE Generational Curriculum Paper 3
BOX To see comments on other Generational Curriculum papers click here and here.

BOX Title: My Personality in Traffic: Learning to Practice What I Preach
This paper, by Angelita Cuyong, involves three parts. It is a really long paper so I will try to report the most salient things in each part.

BOX Part I
In this section Ms. Cuyong describes situations in which she fings herself reacting badly (i.e., traffic violence).
***Situation 1: Construction Causes Destruction in My Mind
Ms. Cuyong describes a situation in which she encounters construction on the freeway, and her reactions and thoughts to this. She felt extreme agitated and angry when she discovered that this construction was actually workmen cutting down some tree branches hanging over the freeway. Her initial reaction was to scream at these workers, but she controlled herself. She then proceeded to weave in and out of traffic, switching between the two lanes available, and suddenly realizing that she looked like a fool because both lanes were going no where.

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***Situation 2: A Car's Sickness is Contagious
She explain how her car was acting weird because she had let the gas tank run to almost empty, and the particles in the gas at the bottom of the tank were inteffering with the gas flow to the engine. Because of this she wanted to yell at everyone else she encountered to make her internal feelings of rage subside. She happened to be going to the same place she bought her car because her brother wanted by a truck. When she approached to saleman she told him "I bought this futless car from you folks. Can you show us something better for my brother?"

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***Situation 3: So Near and Yet So Far
Ms. Cuyong states that she doesn't have to see traffic before she begins to feel that anxiety and stress from it (referring to Friday afternoon traffic). She says she sits in traffic that isn't moving and finds herself wishing she drove a bulldozer so she can run over all the cars in front of her or to ride on someones lawn to go around all the other cars. She sometimes acts like she's talking (bitching) to the driver in front of her, saying rude things. She gets very frustrated because the place she wants to go to is so clase but traffic is so heavy that if she walked she could get there faster.

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***Situation 4: Outlaw Racing on the Freeway
Ms. Cuyong thinks that when she's driving on the freeway cars work together to block her and to keep her from passing them. She explains how she passed a young man in a sports car and he then started to tailgate her, when a slow car was in front of her the guy switched lanes and blocked her in.

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***Situation 5: To Be or Not To Be
Ms. Cuyong thinks that most drivers need to take a course on how to be a polite driver. She hates it when she lets drivers in "her" lane and they don't say thank you. She ends up yelling out the window "you're welcome," stares at them. follows them closely and doesn't let anyone else in "her" lane.

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BOX Part II
In this section Ms. Cuyong tries to think of ways to improve her reactions and thoughts when confronted with these types of situations, or similar ones, again.
***Situation 1: Constructive Thinking to Deal with Construction
While dealing with this type of situation, Ms. Cuyong notices that she has a need to constantly monitor her surroundings, what everyone else is doing around her. She decides that blunting would be the best answer for this scenario. What she means by blunting is softening her reaction in coping with stress. She does this by turning her radio louder, singing to distract her thoughts, turning the air vent to a higher level, small things like that that can distract you a little but don't prevent you from being able to drive.

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***Situation 2: A Remedy to Cure My Cold
She talks about "tuning out" in this section. She embarrassed by the actions of her car so she tunes out the noises and the jerking. She does this by watching other drivers or pedestrians around her. She reduces her personal involvement.

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***Situation 3: "Thoughtless" Thinking
She states that she found she is a very impatient driver who constantly monitors the traffic conditions, the more she pays attention to present situation, the more frustrated she gets. Ms. Cuyong describes "the value of not thinking." She says instead of thinking about what she could be doing if wasn't stuck in traffic, she should think of pleasant things that will help her to feel better and distract her attention away from traffic.

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***Situation 4: Safe Driving is Cooperation Not Competing
She states that she has to learn to differentiate between safe driving and competitiveness. She must learn to appreciate those around her who are facilitators and safe drivers and to use them as role models.

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***Situation 5: Respecting Oneself and Others
Ms. Cuyong realizes that she must allow herself to accept the fact that other drivers have every right to be on the road too. Changing her behavior will allow her to gain new insight, feelings, and perceptions which may help her to become a better driver.

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BOX Part III
In this section of Ms. Cuyong paper, she explains how she applies the things she has learned about her driving behavior and solutions to improve them to situations similar to the ones she described. ***Situation 1: A Change for the Better: Rushful to Relaxing Driving
She began smiling at other drivers. She realized that when she sat in traffic calmly instead of getting all worked up, she would have more energy. She found herself becoming more and more of a facilitative driver.

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***Situation 2: Having the Remedy On-Hand
She was driving her fiances truck one night and it started to act funny. She tried to "tune out" the stress causing factor, but found that she wasn't able to do this completely. She states that she is not willing to make the change and learn how to blunt the situation complete from her mind. This is because she wants to monitor the situation in case anything further goes wrong.

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***Situation 3: Remembering to "Tune Out"
Before facing Friday afternoon traffic, decided to face traffic in a positive manner. While sitting in traffic she let her mind wander and started thinking about things like what to cook for dinner. Before she realized it, she was out of heavy traffic.

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***Situation 4: Facilitative Driving
She was driving on the freeway and noticed all of the other facilitative drivers on the road and found that she wanted to be like them. When a car passed her she didn't feel the need or anxiety she usually does to catch up or keep up with the car.

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***Situation 5: Driving with Aloha (Love)
She encountered a situation where she could either block off a whole bunch of cars or leave a little space to allow them to drive through. She would normally block off the space because no one appreciated her actions. When she did leave a space she receive some thank you's but not from everyone. Amazingly, she says, it did not bother her. She knows that she did the right thing and that's all that matters.

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BOX All it Takes is Determination
From reading Ms. Cuyong's paper I have come to realize that even if other drivers on the road don't change, I should still take the initiative to try and better my driving. No one is perfect, everyone could use some improvement in some aspect of their driving. I think she is well on her way to becoming a totally reformed driver. All she did was set her mind, and she accomplished most of what she set out to do. She never let any of the other driver's discourage her from her goal, although plenty of them tried.

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Week 14 Homework

SMILE Part 1: Cyberspace Collection on Traffic Psychology
BOX Injury Control Resource Information Network
This link is about how to avoid being in traffic accidents. It is also about what to do if you are in a traffic accident. I has stuff about air-bags and a bulletin put up about what to do at a sobriety checkpoint put out by the Berkley Police Department. Did you know that if you see a driver that looks or is driving like he's drunk, you're supposed to call the police? I didn't know that. I have seen many drivers like that when I drive home after work. It's really scary when you encounter one because you have no idea what they are going to do next.

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BOX Critical Mass
Link here to see relevant up-to-date things and happenings of the bicyclist of America. They have their own rallies, terminology, ideal system of road use, and tons of other interesting things which pertain to traffic psychology.

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BOX MIT Press Transportation Studies Series
I found this hot link using the gopher search. It provides several titles and authors to books related to driving and automobiles. It's not that good because you can't read anything from the books (they only give you a short preface) but it tells you how to order the books if you really want to read them.

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BOX Professional Counseling Associates Home Page
I included this because it tells how to achieve counseling for various things, such as anxiety or panic attacks while driving. Plus, I figured we could all use this service after this semester.

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BOX Clean Vehicles and Fuels for British Columbia


This paper is about how clean vehicles and fuels for cars in British America will greatly improve a number of things for them. For example, reduce air pollution, improve over all health of population, and help make driving safer. I think every state, country should implement some sort of bill like this to make the whole worle more breathable.

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BOX Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), University of Washington
I thought this hot link was great, very interesting. It's research program that is studying how to solve traffic problems, namely urban congestion problems. They talk about concepts like the smarter traverler, and issues like how the computer and communication technology can help to solve transportation problems. They also have some neat links pertaining to traffic.

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Week 15 Homework

SMILE This semester has probably been the most stressful for me in all of my 6 years in college. I guess you could say that it has made me a better person. I have to admit that I have learned more in this semester about computers than I probably will for the rest of my life. Even though I say this was a stressful semester for me I pretty much enjoyed it. Dr. James is a great teacher. The thing that really made it great was the class. Everyone was so supportive and understanding about everything. They were also fun to be around, even though we only got to see each other for one day a week.

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SMILE My Web pages are definitely lacking compared to the others in the class. I pretty much had to do only the assigned homework because I didn't have that much time to explore and create. That I regret greatly. I never realized how big the world actually is (maybe because I've lived on Hawaii all my life????).

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SMILE What did it take to accomplish this? Do you have an hour? Really! I spent so many hours on the computer that I have bruises on the bottom of my wrists from typing. And don't forget the psychological stress we all went through. Gee, Dr. James keeps asking to answer these types of questions. I wonder if he likes to her us moan and groan about our woes.

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SMILE The only suggestion I have for the future generations is to take this class, and only this class, for one semester. The extra time you have will be well worth putting into this class, not to mention you'll need the extra time to finish everything.

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SMILE Like I said at the beginning of this report, I thought that I was pretty computer literate when I enrolled in this class, of course I enrolled having no idea that all of our work was to be done on-line. Boy did I get a wake up call. I have never felt more lost, stupid, frustrated, and angry in my life, and all at one time too. I know I grumble a lot, but don't get me wrong, I appreciate everything that I have learned from this course.

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SMILE Am I happy? Am I happy? I'm ecstatic that I finished this class in one piece. Actually, I'm not so sure what my future is on the World Wide Web. If UH continues to let students use its facilities, than I will probably continue using it. I was looking into purchasing one of those os2 warp something or other, but I changed my mind. They're too expensive and I'm not to sure if I'll really use it.

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SMILE The only suggestion that I have for Dr. James is to slow down. Take it easy. I think the generational cyberspace superdocuments are a great idea. You will save a lot of trees Dr. James. Plus enable other students to get the experience they need to excel in our world that is on a fast road to total computerization.

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SMILE I'm not so sure about leaving my files on the Web. It's not such a great thing. In fact it's pretty embarrassing next to everyone else's. I'll think about it...I will hopefully have access to the cyberspace in the future. I think that the cyberspace will become as crowded as our highways are right now. I have no idea how you can regulate something like that either.

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SMILE Thank you Dr. James for giving me the opportunity to learn from your expertise on the World Wide Web and traffic psychology. Good luck to you and your future generations of traffic psychologists.

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