Lab Report 1

Caroline Balatico

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Report 1A

Just a few weeks going into this traffic psychology class, we've learned some interesting ideas. The three most interesting and meaningful ideas that I got thus far in this class are: people are always on the go; pedestrian traffic and road traffic have some similar qualities; and the emotional state of the driver affects the way a person drives.

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Rushing around

People are always on the go. By this, I mean that since we live in a fast-paced society, most people rush around. People are always concerned about time, especially on how they use up their time. Living by the clock (i.e. time) is indicative of a fast-paced society. When people drive, it seems like they have to speed on the freeways and highways so that they could be at a certain place at a certain time. In addition, people on a tight schedule may also end up in car accidents, as a result of their rushing around. Some of us get a little irritated when a driver does the legal speed limit of 55 miles per hour or even driving 10 miles over the legal speed limit, because it is considered "driving too slow" for some of us. Whatever happened to just taking one's time to drive in order to get to one's destination? Driving carefully and cautiously (i.e. taking one's time) will prevent unnecessary car accidents. It will enable us to better judge our driving situations. In addition, it will prevent some of us from being pulled over for speeding.

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Pedestrian and Road Traffic

also see Michelle Ota's report

Pedestrian traffic and road traffic have some commonalities. For example, when an English class gets out at 11:45 a.m. at Kuykendall Hall, there is a herd of students coming down the stair wells (on the right and left side). There are a few people going up the stairs to start their noon classes. People going up the stairs get some dirty looks from the people going down the stairs. These few people going up the stairs feel overwhelmed by this herd because it's as if the people going down the stairs have the "right-of-way." Some of these people going up the stairs feel like they're being trampled over by this on-rush of bodies. Now compare this to a car going down a two-lane one-way street. This one car going the opposite direction is most likely to cause a big collision because the driver of this car went the wrong direction. A second example is when there are one or two people walking very slowly on a sidewalk in front of you. You get teed off because they move like snails. So your best bet is to walk on the grass or on the road in order to slip in front of them so you can get to your next class. Compare this to road driving. There's a slow car in front of you, so you signal and get onto the left or right side of the highway or freeway. You then match speeds with the car you're trying to by-pass, but just gas your car a little more. Then you signal and quickly get ahead of the car that is driving too slow.

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Emotional state

also see Michelle Ota's report

also see Jae Isa's report

The emotional state of the driver is very important. One's driving performance is influenced by one's emotional state. For example, if I am upset at my mother after a big argument, and I drive off, then I tend to stomp on the gas pedal. Our thoughts and feelings do intertwine. In this case, feeling angry may trigger some "I hate you!" thoughts towards my mother. The feelings and the way we drive are influenced by our thoughts. My anger and hateful thoughts makes me grip the steering wheel as I floor the gas pedal. To be in control of one's actions (control of the car), one must control one's thoughts first. In this example, I tell myself to calm down and take things one at a time. When I do this, I feel my foot easing up on the gas pedal as I gently grip the wheel. The result will be that we're able to make better judgments. In other words, getting control of my thoughts will also enable me to control my actions when I'm driving my car. This is why most driving manuals state that it does not recommend driving when one is in an emotional state.

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Conclusion week 1

To conclude, I've discussed that people really do live by the clock. People seem to rush around in order to make better use of their time. It is not good when we rush, especially when we drive, because this may result in an accident. Pedestrian traffic as well as road traffic have some similarities between them. By-passing a slow car in front of you as you switch lanes is similar to by-passing someone who is walking slowly in front of you. Lastly, being aware of our emotions is an important thing to consider before we go driving out onto the roads. Making sure our emotions are in control prevents us from getting into road mishaps.

week 4

As I practiced using the links, such as going to and from my home page to the instructor's home page and other people's home pages, I began to understand how this information system works. All the hours spent at the computer lab really does pay off! It just takes PRACTICE AND PATIENCE.

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modems

A couple of friends of mine who have modems at home say that the set up is very different on their computers. They didn't go into details, though. Some of them told me that they have to wait a long time (5 minutes to n number of hours) just to get logged into the U.H. system. This is because some of the lines that are being fixed or that some of the lines are too jumbled up to allow access through the U.H. system. For me, since I live on campus, the only problem I have is that I don't have a modem at the dorm. So I have to walk down to the computer labs to do all my assignments. Sometimes, I tend to get teed off because there may be some classes going on when I want to use the computer. This means that I have to wait until the afternoons or early evenings to go onto the computer. But, this is just a minor problem.

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specific things

When I have to look for specific things, I use the backslash (/) mark to open up the search command. Then, I just type in the word that I'm looking for. First, it helps if you NARROW down the topic that you are trying to look for. In other words, I try to be as SPECIFIC as I can before I search for a word. If I can't get down to specifics, I just follow the links that will lead me to the word I'm looking for. I do this by pressing the space bar and reading everything in sight.

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links/anchors

When viewing the syllabus or the instructor's weekly comments files, it is much easier to make a link to the anchors that he (Dr. James) has made. I find that sometimes it's not necessary to go to Dr. James' home page; I just follow the links and keep on hitting the space bar until I find what I am looking for. Making links is an easier way to find things faster and it also saves me time.

pessimism

The way I fight pessimism when I'm working on the information highway is that I try to take things step-by-step. Believe me, I am an easily stressed out person with an anxious persona. When things don't work out for me, I start giving people that "ice cold" look even though I don't mean it. This is one way I channel my emotions. I try to contain my pessimism by first calming myself down. When I calm myself down, this is when I can think clearly. I also add in some deep breathing patterns. For example, when I am working on the computer and I see an error message, I swear silently to myself (doesn't everybody?). Then I try to look for the help menu and evaluate what I did wrong. If the help menus don't work, then I ask the lab monitors for help. I know that some of them don't even know the emacs system (how did they get hired, anyways?), but if I come on certain days (Fridays or Wednesdays), then there are at least one or two people who do know the system which helps lessen my stress. Or, instead of being in a huffy mood, I try to write down the commands that I used and I ask some of my friends on what went wrong. I use my pessimism to my advantage. After being frustrated and feeling stressed out, I look at the positive end of this spectrum and tell myself that this is normal. I try to think positively, because from the frustrations that I went through, I learned some things in the process. I'm not going through this alone, because everyone else is going through the same thing I'm going through trying to figure out this Internet system. All the trials that we're going through especially with this class is all part of the learning process. Things will definitely get easier with patience and a positive mind.

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depression

To avoid being depressed, I try to be positive as I've mentioned earlier. When I can't find something in the computer, I get pissed off in the beginning. But then I tell myself, "HEY CHILL; look at this as a challenge!". When this kind of attitude enters my mind, my adrenaline starts pumping. On the computer, I then start to look at other ways I can go about finding my topic. I keep on pressing the / key or space bar until *BAM*; I've found my topic (or found something related to my topic)!

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Keep the faith!

Therefore, my advice to others is to: (1) Take notes on what you did so you can explain to Dr. James on why you had problems on the computer. (2) Transform that negative energy (i.e. stress, frustration, and the urge to hurl the computer out the window, etc.) to an energy that will work productively for you. Ask lots of questions (even though it may seem silly or stupid) and look at how other people in the class did their files. (3) Remember that in all the stress and frustration that you are or will be going through, there is something that is/will be discovered. Mistakes really do open the doors to opportunities and more knowledge. This is the way we learn. In addition, remember that all of us in class are going through all these trials together. So open your minds and keep the faith!

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Report 1B

In Paul Suyat's Generational Curriculum report on "The Driving Personality Makeover", he describes that there are three possible ways to change one's own driving behavior:(1) change one's feelings (2) change one's thoughts and (3) change one's sensorimotor skills. In changing his feelings when driving, he said that one's driving performance is influenced by one's emotional state. As an example, he mentioned that he once tailed a car and followed the person up to his driveway because the person cut him off; but his passenger kept him from punching out the person who cut him off. Paul's solution is to learn to keep his feelings in check while he's out driving, especially if he's in a poor mood. In changing one's thoughts, he said that our thoughts and feelings are intertwined: his feelings and the way he drives are influenced by his thoughts. Therefore, he tends to floor the gas pedal when he's mad or pissed off; he doesn't even care how fast he's going. Lastly, in changing his sensorimotor skills, Paul said that in order to be in control of his actions, he must control his thoughts first. This allows him to make better judgments and this makes him lay off the gas pedal.

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social influences

In Paul's second Generational Curriculum report, he discusses the different social influences on driving behavior. In modeling, he used ambulance chasers as an example. This occurs especially during rush hour and after a major accident, traffic slows down and when an ambulance comes by, everyone moves to the side to make way for it. After it has passed, many drivers slide in behind the ambulance and follow it. The first person to get behind the ambulance serves as a model to other drivers. When everyone sees that these drivers are moving quicker, they try to imitate their actions by pulling into the lane that's being cleared by the ambulance. Secondly, there's the "acquiring information from others" behavior. As an example, when you're driving and the other person ahead of you slows down, you assume from this one action that there might be an accident up ahead. Or you assume that the person up ahead of you was speeding and spotted a cop with a radar gun and he/she decides to slow down in order to not get caught. When you are made aware of this situation, then you can take action. Lastly, there's the "communication among drivers" behavior. Basically, these are non-verbal cues that we, as drivers, give to each other out on the road. For example, giving someone "the finger"; giving someone the shaka sign; honking your horn; and flicking your headlights on and off.

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my thoughts and reactions

My reaction to the first Generational Curriculum report was that I have to agree with some of the things that were said, such as one's driving performance really is influenced by one's emotional state. I'd have to disagree with Paul's way of handling the situation that he used in the example, though. Projecting his anger towards someone else doesn't accomplish anything because it'll just make the situation much worse! He also had no right to follow that person home just because that person cut him off the road. He could've been charged with harassment or stalking, for that matter. What Paul should have done was to vent his anger out on something instead of someone. Or what he should have done was to stop driving for a while in order to calm himself down. For me, when I get mad at someone for almost hitting me or for cutting me off, the first thing I do is yell and swear. I don't yell out the window to that person, but I yell in the car instead. I don't care if the drivers next to me hear me; at least I'm not hurting or harming anyone. The next thing I do is to calm myself down and I breathe deeply. Doing this helps me to contain myself, because I am concerned about my safety as well as the safety for the other drivers. I've almost had some close calls where I was at the boiling point, that I almost missed hitting a pedestrian or almost missed rear ending someone. Being emotionally out of control and operating a vehicle is indeed very dangerous!

For the second Generational Curriculum report, the modeling and the communication among drivers portions got my attention. Imitating other drivers on the road is interesting to observe. What gets me is that who's to say who's right and who's wrong? I guess that if something looks "logical"(i.e. practical) to you and if it doesn't harm anyone, then it is considered "good" to follow. After you imitate that model, then there is some sort of "reward" in the end. For example, in my dance class, our instructor demonstrates new jazz combinations every week. All of us try to imitate her dance moves. Some of us aren't as good as she is, but we try our best. In the end, after trying out the dance steps, the rewards are: we've learned some funky new dance steps, we're having fun dancing all over the studio, and also we're earning our grades for this class. Applying this modeling concept to driving behavior, I'll use this example: it's dusk already as you drive home from work. There's a few minutes of sunlight left and you pass some cars with their headlights on. Seeing this, you also turn on your headlights, since the sun's just below the horizon and it's almost getting dark soon. Turning on your headlights is logical, because there's only a couple of minutes of sunlight left. Your reward is when it's completely dark, then you'll be able to see the road as well as the other cars around you. For the communication among drivers part of the report, I'd have to say that I'd rather drive here in Hawaii rather than on the mainland. The drivers here really are more courteous and the highways/freeways are much more safer to drive on. When you allow someone in your lane here in Hawaii, the person flashes you a shaka sign or waves a "thank you" to you. Some drivers even let you know (kindly) that you need to turn on your headlights when it's dusk time. But in California, it's like "survival of the fittest" up there! I have some family members who live up there and they drive crazy! For example, when we (my aunts, uncle, cousin, and I) were entering the freeway system in the Los Angeles area, one of my aunts pointed out these special lights right next to the merging signs. These lights were located at the freeway entrance. The lights are designed so that the red light comes on, and then the green light flashes a few seconds later. There's two lanes of cars wanting to enter the freeway at the same time. When the red light comes on, two cars wait at the stop line. When the green light comes on, then the two cars can enter the freeway simultaneously. Then the pattern starts over again. When the cars enter the freeway, there's enough road distance to blend into the ongoing traffic on the freeway. This means that there's more cars coming onto the freeway every second. There's no time to come to a full stop to make sure you blend in safely. Timing is everything! I was just amazed at how there was no accidents when we were there. It seemed like everything was flowing smoothly! In addition, their minimum speed limit is 60 miles per hour. Californians interpret this as driving at 80 to 90 miles an hour! Believe me, this is how my uncle and my aunt drive up there! Down here, I'm used to going at a maximum speed of 70 miles per hour. Californians don't even signal that they're going to change lanes; they just zip in and out of traffic! I even hung on very tightly to my seat as my uncle was weaving through cars on the freeway; I didn't know if he was going to stay in one lane or slide into the next lane. It was like riding on an out of control roller coaster! I got a natural "high" out of this experience! Therefore, on the California freeways, everything seems to flow smoothly with no tie-ups (well, at least when I was there) and it seems like if you are stalled on the freeway, people will just bowl you over without stopping.

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Report 1C

My Internet activities seem to sometimes go up and down. I easily get frustrated trying to figure out how to make links and anchors to certain files. But it's a good thing that we can take a look at how someone else did these links and anchors just by looking at his/her back pages. Analyzing line by line how someone else typed in certain commands makes it much easier for me to figure things out. I've been going to the computer lab practically everyday just to put in some practice time. Sometimes, I tend to run into dead ends after spending an hour on the computer, but I take these plateaus as "good signs" because they help me to understand the "whole picture" as to why I ran into these dead ends. I also learn what not to do the next time I'm on the computer. In addition, sometimes the instructions aren't clear. For example, if I push a wrong key while I'm typing out my report and I want to save it, the computer can't sometimes save my report; the system tends to lock sometimes. I can't call what key I pressed, but instead, I go immediately to the help menu to see what my other options are instead of having to type my entire report again. After going into the help menu, I feel a little bit of relief. After spending five or six weeks on this Internet system, a part of me has got some of the gist of it.

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downside

I am amazed though, that everyone can get access to what we are writing in our "plain old lab reports." Someone in Russia or China can even critique our reports if they wanted to. A small part of me thinks that this Internet system can sometimes be scary. This is because you think that whatever you are typing on the computer, no one can possibly have access to; some of the stuff you write can also reveal a private thought or idea of your own opinion. But on this information superhighway, everyone can get access to your files; sometimes, even hacking into it. It seems like people can read your mind or something and that they know your deepest "secrets" and your every thought. SPOOKY! This also brings to mind those computer sex news reports where people can actually get arrested for displaying sexual conversations with minors on this Internet system.

upside

But there indeed is an upside to this Internet system. As I've noted before, I am amazed at the awesomeness of this information system because it serves as a gateway to everyone worldwide. This is a great way to also learn about each other's cultures as well as to make new friendships in the process. I am keeping an optimistic attitude at learning more about this Internet system.

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week 5

What the student had accomplished in one semester in his Generational Curriculum Report was: (1) keeping his feelings under control when he's driving; (2) learning how to find journal articles on the CD-Rom and under PsychLit at the library and doing library research; (3) learning the different social influences on driving behavior; and (4) applying psychological theories to driving behavior (i.e. the Kelmann model, etc.)

state of mind

I couldn't really tell what the student's state of mind was as the semester had progressed. This is because he wasn't specific on the topics he presented; he just stated what the main ideas were without using that much examples. For example, he didn't integrate his own opinions on what he thought of the theories that he learned and how they applied to driving behavior. It seems like he's just repeating what his resources (i.e. the journal articles) said and he left out his own opinions on what he read.

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self-witnessing reports

In these self-witnessing reports, I learned that one must be aware of his/her driving behavior in order to become better drivers, as well as to be aware of how others drive in order to improve one's behavior. For example, being aware of how you feel while you're driving reflects the way you're driving. When you're happy and feeling care free, you tend to be aware of the traffic or tend to do the minimum speed limit or go at least five miles over the speed limit. When you're angry or sad, you may tend to go a little faster as well as have some close calls with the other cars. This is because your mind is somewhere else and that you're concentration is out of whack.

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affects and self-witnessing reports

The emotional factor as stated in these reports greatly affected me. I had no idea how very important our feelings and emotional state really affects our driving behavior. Before, I used to think since I'm behind the wheel, I'm being protected by this metal shell. Nothing can harm me. I didn't consider that my state of mind reflected the way I drove. Now, my attitude is that I must be in the "here and now" when I'm driving. If I let my mind start to wander, then I might hit another car or hit a pedestrian or even have other close calls. When I'm driving and tell myself that I am "here and now" in the car, my mind is more focused and aware of the traffic situations.

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suggestions

My suggestions for future generations reading this is to apply some of the psychological theories to driving behavior and to put in your own views and opinions on the topics. Put in as many examples as you possibly can so that your readers can understand what you're trying to get across in your reports. Also, don't be discouraged when doing library research. Just be patient and in time you will find what you're looking for.

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Report 2A

The only class activity that we did thus far were the oral presentations on the Generational Curriculum reports. We did not do any other class activities as of yet. What did I get out of the oral presentations? Well, I learned some new traffic psychology terms such as accordian affect, convoys, bystander effect, and ambulance chasers (I didn't know what it was called when people had pulled into the ambulance lane after it has passed by, but now I know!). I've also learned that everyone has experienced the same driving situations such as being pulled over by cops for speeding or D.U.I., giving "the finger" to those inconsiderate drivers who cut you off, and discussing the similarities between driving and walking. We also went over some psychological states that we display behind the wheel and how these had affected our driving. For example, when we're feeling good, we tend to "dance" in our car seats (i.e. some jerky body movements and waving our hands in the air). For me, I've done this at some traffic lights as well as witnessed this when seeing other people at some stop signs. I don't care if people are watching me or think I'm looney, at least I'm still aware of the road conditions and I'm awake. I also find myself alert, too! Some suggestions that I have in doing these oral presentations is that we can learn some preventive driving mishaps on the road by first improving our driving behaviors. We can do this by keeping our emotions in check before going out the door (i.e. if we're pissed off, we must calm ourselves down first before starting the ignition so we don't get into an accident); being considerate to other drivers (i.e. not taking up two parking spaces when you have to parallel park); and to think safety first, because it's our human minds that operates the car, not the other way around (i.e. don't think you're protected by this metal shell).

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sort of class activity

The only other "class activity" that I just thought of, that we've done, was to discuss our Internet activities. In particular, we've been going over our difficulties in mastering this Internet system. I'd have to say that we spend at least three-fourths of the class time letting out our frustrations and talking about our problems we've encountered on the computer. It seems like we're just discussing the same driving behaviors over and over again; it seems like we're going in circles and we're not getting anywhere. We're not fulfilling the "traffic psychology" part of this course; we're emphasizing more on the computer stuff instead of driving behavior. This is actually a computer class, in my opinion. When I signed up for this class, I expected to learn about driving behavior, not creating computer files and commands! The Internet is indeed awesome and interesting. I really am learning the Internet material (slowly, like everyone else), but it seems like we're dealing with two courses here; the practical or hands on experience (in the computer labs) and the theoretical part or lecture part in class. It also seems like we have to do double the work! I already feel stressed out by all this! Are we getting anywhere in this course (i.e. fulfilling the requirements of the course title's name) or what? Anyone who's reading this can criticize me all they want, but this is how I feel right now after going through five weeks in this course.

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week 6

I finally found these three traffic related documents! The way I went about this task is that I used the lynx http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/con/leonpsy/leon.html command and went into the traffic psychology files. From there, I went to the weekly homework assignment files and looked up the homework for week #6. Under this assignment, there were some resources that we could use to look up the documents. I chose to use the Webcrawler program. After I logged into this program, I typed in "traffic*driving". The * signified the separation of these two words. Upon typing these words, I pressed the TAB command and hit RETURN to activate the search system. A few seconds later, the computer found several titles and commands where it indicated "traffic*driving" in them. On some of the titles I looked at, I had to wait five minutes (maximum) just to gain access to some of these files. It took me at least three hours just to find these three documents because it took so long for the Internet system to get these files! It's a pain just sitting there in front of the computer waiting and waiting for my files to come up! I also lost some patience and vented out my frustrations by silently swearing under my breath and by pounding the keyboard. The Internet system is cool, but it's irritating to wait for your information to come up on the screen because other people are on it or the location where the information is coming from is far away (I tried Florida, but I had to wait at least 7 minutes for the info to come in). Here are the summaries of the three documents that I found.

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Southern California Traffic Report

This Southern California Traffic Report provides freeway traffic information to people on the Internet. In other words, this program deals with traffic watch problems for Internet users. It shows computer graphic maps of Southern California, incident reports, and computer sensor locations (like in Los Angeles and Orange County. These sensor data show the flow rates and speeds for all the traffic lanes at on and off ramps at each location. Files on road conditions and the California weather are also provided. One can even play a virtual tourist too, on the Internet. A person can select tourist attractions such as Disneyland, the Exploratorium in San Francisco, and Hearst Castle just by selecting some of the files shown. These files show descriptive information on these attractions. My reactions to this computer program? I think that this is a neat program because it provides information on the traffic situation in California via the Internet. I didn't know that kind of information could be accessable to the ordinary person. Before I knew of this system, I thought that the traffic situation in a certain place is regulated only by the city and government people, because of the sophisticated computer technology (i.e. the flow system, computer sensors at an intersection, etc.) that's needed. I think it's neat that anyone can get an idea of the traffic situation before heading out the door just by logging onto the Internet. What I also like about this report is that it shows computer graphics of the maps of the roadways in California. To the commuter, this person can call up a certain intersection and check to see if the traffic is heavy or not so that he/she can devise alternate ways before leaving his/her home. I also thought that the virtual tourist portion of this program was neat, because I've been wanting to visit my relatives in the San Pedro area of California. I've been to the major tourist attractions already (i.e. Disneyland, Magic Mountain, Universal Studios), but I've never heard of Hearst Castle before. The next time I visit California (preferably after my spring graduation this semester), I might check this tourist attraction out.

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Tucson to Flagstaff

Day 1--Tucson to Flagstaff is a report based on this a road trip that this duo had taken. It basically explored what they encountered and what their feelings were on the trip. It was neat how they described in detail on what they encountered because it felt like I was also there with them. I am also very interested in Native American culture, which is why I found this document captivating. For example, on the Native American history portion that they talked about, the significance of rain had varied in some of these cultures. In the Indi nation, the meaning of "rain" represents those who have died. This duo also had visited the Heard Museum and discussed the art of sandpainting. These two also made a lot of links to some indian names and some of the tourist attractions they had visited so that when someone wants to know what a certain word meant, then they can link up to that word. When the word comes up, it also comes along with some background information on the significance of it.

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York Traffic Web

York Traffic Web is based on a document that had argued the need to design and assess new ways of reducing urban traffic congestion and improving the urban environment. The way that the urban environment could be improved is by using traffic signal controls, better traffic management, road pricing, and route guidance. A "real world" traffic control engineer's perspective is used in this report. It was suggested that accurate computer models of congestion should be made so as to reduce congestion. Traffic simulation methods were also brought up to improve the conditions on the roadways. I thought that these are good models to have so that life on the roads could be a lot easier. I don't know if Honolulu has taken into consideration these computer models; I'm sure they have, or else the city would be in a world of chaos now.

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traffic in Honolulu

see also Michelle's report

Speaking of the traffic in Honolulu, it seems like it's getting worse, especially with the ongoing occurrence of development. This document really didn't go into details on what should be done, though. I also think that the people should have a say on what really goes on, on our roadways, to prevent further driving mishaps. But it seems like people just get ticked off and do nothing about some of the road hazards that occurs. For example, when I come back to the dorms from Waipahu on Sunday nights, I always cringe when I'm about to use the University off-ramp. There is not enough space for the cars wanting to enter the freeway so that they can safely blend in! In addition, the cars wanting to enter the off-ramp (me included) also have to make sure that we safely "blend in" with these cars entering the freeway. I've had at least some close calls already. I even remember watching on the Channel 9 news once that this off-ramp is the most dangerous area to use. I haven't heard of any "official" solution, if any, on what can be done about this area.

My comments on Other Students' Lab Reports

My Comments

I just got done reading some of the lab reports. There are a lot of creative writers in our class because everyone wrote a lot of interesting stories! This class indeed proves challenging because of the interesting stories written by everyone in class. Here are my comments on what I thought of them.

[Comments week 5, First 3 links]=anchor

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Akagi 1

In his report, also see Shane Akagi's report Shane said that drivers felt that they are expected to drive very fast on the highways. These drivers feel that they are holding up the traffic, so therefore they tend to speed up. This is their self-fulfilling prophecy. I do agree with him, because that's what highways (as well as freeways) are for; to speed on at high rates! I think that these drivers need to speed up in order to keep up with the flow of traffic. If they don't speed up, then they'll distort the flow of traffic. This may result in a traffic jam or may cause an accident because all the other cars are going fast (speeding) while this driver isn't going fast (not speeding). When something fast hits something slow, then there's a huge collision. I think the advantage of speeding is that you get to your destination faster as well as it saves time. On the other hand, the disadvantage of speeding is that you may cause an accident because you don't have enough reaction time.

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Allen 1

I have to disagree on Jo Allen's report see also Allen's report on the over-confident driver. She stated that the aggressive driver and the over-confident driver go hand in hand. I have to admit, that I am composed of these two personality traits. As an aggressive driver, I tend to tailgate people on the freeway because I am always rushing to work. I sometimes don't even know that I am tailgating someone, until I find myself three feet away from the person ahead of me. But when I'm aware that I'm tailgating someone, I tend to switch over to the next lane so I won't irk that person. I am also realizing that I am starting to drive like my uncle Richard. He's a California driver. I will talk about him as well as other mainland drivers in the next paragraph; stay tuned! Getting back to my aggressive driving, yes, I tend to go 15 miles over the speed limit as well as constantly switching lanes so I could make it to work on time. But I also make sure that there's no cops around before I start flooring the gas pedal. I've never been stopped by one yet; knock on wood! I am also the over-confident driver because when I switch lanes, I sometimes depend on my side view and rear view mirrors! I know that I'm supposed to physically turn my head to check if the coast is clear before I change. I like to use the mirrors more so that I can also pay attention to what's going on ahead of me in traffic. I know it takes just a couple of seconds to turn your head to see if any cars are coming, but I sometimes feel that if I take my eyes off the road in front of me for a few seconds, then I'll rear end someone. I also have to admit though, when I use my mirrors to change lanes, I always check 4 or 5 times to ensure myself that it's safe to switch over to the next lane.

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Takitani 1

When I read Tod Takitani's also see Takitani's report comment on what Hawaii drivers are really like, I started to laugh. Then I started laughing even harder when I found out that he used to live in California. This brought to mind my uncle Richard's driving style. First of all, though, let me rephrase what Tod said. He wrote, "Hawaii drivers are overprotective, overconsiderate drivers who disrupt the normal flow of traffic." Yep, this is indeed true of us, in the Aloha state. This also brought back memories of my uncle Richard's visit here to Hawaii just a few years ago. When my auntie and he came down here to get married, my uncle was complaining that Hawaii drivers drive SLOW. He was a maniac when he was driving on the freeway when he borrowed my other auntie's car. He was weaving in and out of cars like a mad man. While the other cars drove with the normal flow of freeway speed, my uncle was the only one who was disrupting this "normal flow" of traffic. After this experience, I promised myself if I'm visiting my uncle and my auntie in California, I would make my auntie drive me around. After witnessing how my uncle drove, I concluded that: California drivers drive 80 miles per hour or more, they don't use their signal lights when they're switching lanes, and they just bowl everyone over without a "thank you" sign. Sorry, but this is my bias. One's driving techniques does depend on the driving environments.

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Comments week 6, Next 3 links

ota 1

I was amazed at what Ota also see Michelle Ota's report did! She indicated that she blocked a motorcyclist's way when he tried to overtake her. When I first read this, I thought that she could have seriously injured the person and would have gotten sued if she hit the guy. Then I also felt relieved that she didn't hit him and that she was brave enough to block his way just to piss him off. If I was in this situation, I would just let the guy go and say to myself, "Geez...what an idiot! He has no patience!"

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slaughter 1

In Terri Slaughter's report, also see Slaughter's report she said that she needs to allow more time to get to her destination. I totally agree with her. When I drive to work from Waipahu to Ala Moana Shopping Center every weekend, I find that most of the time, I tend to rush. I'd say that it takes me at least 20 to 25 minutes to get to Ala Moana going at 65 or 70 miles an hour (this includes traffic light stops along Ala Moana Blvd.). But this scenario is when I'm rushing to work. When I'm not rushing, I'd say that it takes me a half hour to get there (traffic included). I also find that when I give myself more time, I tend to be more relaxed.

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matsuyoshi 1

I loved Matsuyoshi's description of the invisibility people feel when they're in their cars. also see Kendall Matsuyoshi's report He indicated that people who are in their cars feel invisible to the outside world. Therefore, this means that they could do anything they wish, like digging their noses for example (as Kendall said). I also find this effect hilarious because some people think that no one is looking at them when they are in this metal shell, but in reality, people do look just to see what you're doing or to see who's in your car. When I'm at a traffic light, I like to observe people in their cars just to see what they're up to instead of just staring at the bright red traffic light. Some people just frown behind their sunglasses, they check their hair or face, or they're checking out the other drivers in their cars. This is a fun and safe thing to do; it's also a good way of observing the funny things we do and this is also a great way to search for stand-up comedy material!

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Comments week 7, 6 new hot links

passive-aggressive

In Diane Beauchmin's report see also Beauchmin's report she mentioned the DSM IV categorization of drivers. I do agree with what she said in terms of mentioning the different types of drivers. For example, we have the obsessive-compulsive driver who does the speed limit in the fast lane. Or we have the passive-aggressive driver who had a bad day or bad life (as she puts it) and this driver feels justified in taking out their frustrations on you by seeing how close they can tailgate you. For me, I especially hate these kinds of drivers, because when I check my mirrors, it seems like they're right on my bumper. What I do is try to slow down or speed up to let the driver know that he/she can overtake me, so that they can be on their way and so they can leave me in peace!

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Tod's compliment

Tod Takitani's report see also Takitani's report was hilarious!. He labeled me as "silent but violent." At first, I was stunned, then I laughed! Hey Tod, you know what? I remember in my transpersonal psych class someone once thought of me as "silent, but deadly"! Can you believe it? Well, just to let you know, there's a real person in this body too, that is like everybody else; only thing my "quiet" side is more dominant when I'm in class. Oh, I'll speak when I'm spoken to or I'll speak if I find the class discussion very interesting. Even at work, I do "talk story" with my patients just to put them as well as me, at ease when they're having their eyes examined. I'm really a friendly person once you get to know me more. So I'm not offended or anything by your comment; in fact, this is the second most unusual compliment that anyone has said about me. Just remember that everyone acts the same, only thing that their dominant sides is what makes them stand out! Again, thanks for the compliment!

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cell phones

Jae Isa's report see also Isa's report mentioned that cellular phone drivers engage in 1) placing a call, 2) casual chit-chat, and 3) intense conversation with the caller resulting in the greatest performance decrement. I, myself, hate this kind of drivers because in my opinion, some of them think that they are invincible when it comes to dialing the phone as well as watching the road conditions at the same time. These drivers think that they won't get into an accident even if they take their eyes off the road for a couple of seconds just to dial. Well, they're dead wrong! If they need to dial, they should wait until they are waiting at a traffic light or they should at least pull over to the side. They're putting us other drivers in danger. In addition, a couple of weeks ago when my aunts and cousin took me out to dinner, we saw this guy driving in his truck along Nimitz highway. This guy was dialing his cell phone, changing out of his T-shirt into another shirt, and was driving on the road all at the same time! HE WAS AN IDIOT, IDIOT, IDIOT!!! He was driving right ahead of us and he was weaving on the road too! We thought that he was going to hit the cars in the next lane or fender-bend someone! Thank God he didn't cause a collision!

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matsuyoshi 2

In Kendall Matsuyoshi's report see also Matsuyoshi's report he mentioned that his car gives him freedom. His car is his "baby"; it is his personal pride and joy. He's very lucky that he has his own car because he could go anywhere he wants to go. I wish I had my own car so I could go anywhere I please at my own convenience. For me, when I need to go out or when I go to work, I borrow my mom's car or my dad's truck. This means that I have to share the car or truck with them. When one of them needs the car/truck, they drop me off at work or take me to the places I need to go. It's okay by me, but I'd rather have my own car; I'd rather have my own prized possession and no one else's. To me, a car is a reflection of one's own personality. One can use it and maintain it the way one wants. Having your own car symbolizes that you can go your own way on your own time. Kendall also doesn't want to catch the bus again. Maybe he had a bad experience that he doesn't want to talk about, I'm assuming. For me, I only take the bus if it's NECESSARY. I always tend to encounter the weirdest people. When I was in high school, my dad and I caught the bus to the main library in downtown on a weekend. On our way there, one of the passengers was a man who was going schizo (i.e. talking nonsense stuff) and he was harassing this old woman. The bus driver gave him several warnings and he still continued harassing the woman. The rest of us patrons didn't want to get involved, because we were not sure what was going to happen. Finally, the bus driver stopped at a bus stop and told the guy to get off the bus. The guy did, with no argument. I was so scared in this situation because I didn't know if the guy was going to pull a gun on everyone or if he was going to pull out a knife. Thank God this was not a crisis situation. This is why I only take the bus as my last resort.

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slaughter 2

Terri Slaughter talks about getting to her meeting by any means necessary see also Slaughter's report . In her paragraph, she mentioned that she needed to get to her meeting in 15 minutes from Kailua to downtown. Her mind set was, "Get out of my way, I'm late!" and it seemed like she drove in any way possible so she could get to her meeting on time. When I read this, I laughed because I see myself acting this way when I am on my way to work. Whenever I get up late, I rush around. After downing the last piece of my breakfast, things start going wild for me. My mom and dad know I'm late for work when I start running around the house gathering all my things together. They immediately get out of my way. When I finally get on the freeway, I start weaving in and out of cars, being careful not to tailgate anyone and making sure that the coast is clear when I turn on my blinkers to let the other drivers know I want to switch lanes. As I mentioned before, if I'm rushing to work, it usually takes about 20 to 25 minutes from Waipahu to Ala Moana. It's amazing I haven't gotten into any collisions yet (knock on wood many times), but I've almost had several close calls due to my reckless driving. The funny thing is, when I find myself rushing most of the time, I tend to take my time on the freeways and roads. I do this, because I also keep in mind that I want to get to work in one piece, as well as to get home safely.

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lai 1

It seems like Joleen Lai's see also Lai's report doesn't like speeders. She mentioned that she hates it when people speed on freeway, especially in crowded or congested areas. She also doesn't like the "weavers" who zip in and out of traffic at peak time. I have to laugh at these people who zigzag in between cars while you're in traffic, and the next time you see them, you both end up in another traffic jam which gets the both of you no where. I also hate these speeders who think that since they're driving fast at peak time, they think they could get to their destination a lot faster. All they're doing is causing more tie ups because some of them are cutting in front of people or are cutting up ahead at the on-ramps and off-ramps. People should just wait and have patience. If they are patient, then they wouldn't get any more agitated than they already are when they're in a traffic jam. Being patient can also help with one's health in terms of decreasing one's blood pressure. Also, patience will get you home in one piece.

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Comments week 8, 6 new hot links to Psy 409

Asahina 1

In Alison Asahina's report, see also Asahina's report she said she also hated computers when she first started her Psy. 409 class. But her attitude now is that she wants to buy her own computer. She and Beverly Diaz said that it's like they're programming the computer. I didn't think of this up till now...we really can call ourselves "computer programmers" because we're used to typing in certain commands on the Internet. In order to write our lab reports, we needed to know how the Internet worked technically. Last semester, I even took statistics! I hated to run my computer programs because one misspelled word or one bad command made a huge difference in making my program work or not work. I was fed up with computers!!! But then, I signed up for this traffic psychology class and yep, the computers came back to haunt me! But now, I'm doing fine and I feel comfortable using computers. What keeps me sane when I run into problems is that I just remind myself that I have to be patient. When I am patient and when I start to relax, I can think clearly. Clarity allows me to figure out what went wrong in my program.

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Badua 1

I was surprised that Delia see also Del Badua's report was able to get access to the Madonna fan club's home page! She wanted to get into the White House like her friend did, but was unable to. But she was able to get into the Madonna files. She was also able to see pictures on Mosaic. She was once an IBM user only, but with some time and patience, she is now able to use the IBM and Mac computers. This is a great double advantage for her! I think it was neat the way she had the time to be able to explore what was on the Internet. For me, I have yet to explore all the cool stuff on the Internet.

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Diaz 1

Beverly Diaz see also Diaz's report explains the concept of "fingering." This is when someone is searching for them while they are working on the server. "Talking" is communicating with someone on another server, just like a phone call except the conversation is on a computer screen. I've tried this several times, but I still didn't catch how to get access to this "talk" file. Then Shane Akagi and Michelle Ota finally showed me how to do it. I still haven't tried this, but I will as soon as my schedule is free. My friends say that this is a fun thing to do, and one of my friends even met a guy on this "talk" system. This makes me want to try this as soon as possible. But I find that when I'm working in the lab and the person next to me is using this "talk" mode, I am irritated by this person because he/she is making a lot of noise and is disturbing my concentration. I give him/her the "stink eye" and they catch the hint...they continue typing in silence.

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Alamares 1

The way Carol Alamares see also Alamares's report deals with eye strain is that every 10 or 15 minutes, she'll look someplace else for at least 30 seconds. This helps to relieve the stress looking at the same focal point for a long time. She also shifts in her seat to be more comfortable while she's doing her computer work. Yep, I also experience eye strain every time I use the computer. I feel like my eyes are ready to pop out of my head! I also find myself working a little more closer to the computer screen; my face is at least a foot or less away from the screen. I think I'm getting more and more near sided! Aaahhh!!! My eyes also start burning because if I'm in an air-conditioned environment for so many hours, my hard contacts start drying out, causing the burning sensation. The doctors at work tell everyone that if they're doing VDT (video display terminal) work, then it's best to take a break from the computer for at least a couple of minutes at a time. But do I listen to their advice? Nope! I like to keep on pounding away at the computer until I finish most of my work. But to prevent myself from hurting my eyes, I will try to rest them for a couple of minutes at a time...there's no guarantee I'll abide by this though!

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Higa 1

I totally agreed on what Ryan Higa said see also Higa's report about expecting to understand and absorb new material instantly. This is one's mindset before learning anything new. You're supposed to learn it "just like that", or you think, "It's not supposed to take this long to figure out!" (as Ryan mutters to himself sometimes). But learning doesn't work this way. Learning something new works in increments and it requires repetition. When we first began learning about the Internet system, all of us were blown away by the overwhelming amount of stuff we had to learn just to get started. In addition, we felt like Dr. James was putting more pressure on us to learn this system "instantly." Thus began the frustration, confusion, and madness that we all felt when we were wrestling with this cyberspace environment. But it was good that everyone was in the same boat and that we bonded by venting out our little irritations about the Internet. We're also learning through this group experience. This was how we fought our pessimism and depression.

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Remata 1

Time...wish we had more of it! This is what Cheryl Remata talks about in her report see also Remata's report . She says that this class takes up so much time, that she is scraping for more of it. Yes, I have to agree with her, because most of our time is spent in the computer labs or on the computer at home. What's worse is that when we have our other classes to worry about in terms of studying for midterms or writing other reports, then we have no time to do our computer work. Trying to do my computer stuff in one sitting isn't enough time for me, because I sometimes get tired, or even frustrated if my links won't work. I space out my computer lab times throughout the school week; I'd say I spend at least 2 or 3 hours a day on the computer doing the work for this class. I wish there were more hours in a day, but this isn't going to happen. But, at least I'm caught up with most of the weekly homework assignments, instead of putting them off until the last minute.

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week 7

self-witnessing

In Dr. James' article, he mentioned that, "Grading did not take into account the content of the self-reports but only the from, namely, how extensively did the student carry out the instructions." In my opinion, I do agree with the last part of this statement because we should be judged on how extensively we spent on the Internet system. As Dr. James indicated, the physical appearance of the report (i.e. the size, format, etc.) was highly correlated with the many hours spent on the Internet. When we first started out on the Internet, it seemed like we spent practically everyday in the computer labs just trying to figure out how to work the system. But as we got used to this information superhighway, our computer time was cut down because we were familiar with some of the commands and how to switch over to certain pages. But the only disadvantage that I have to comment on is that it's sometimes hard to keep up with the weekly homeworks especially when it's midterm season and we have to worry about our other classes. I remember Dr. James saying that we have to put in at least 20 hours a week on the Internet system! I know he doesn't collect our computer homework like regular class homework where we turn it in to him. But I have to say that it's very stressful when we have to decide about going into the computer lab to do our homework, or decide if we should study some more for our midterm for our other classes. I know...time management plays a critical factor in this dilemma. I know that I'm getting off the subject. I'm in this situation right now, because I'm trying to put in enough study time for my human sexuality midterm while at the same time remembering all the dance steps for my dance midterm, in addition to putting at least two hours everyday on the computer. I'm trying my hardest to do all these three things at once, and it's HELL!!! I pray that all the hours spent on the computer will pay off in terms of my grade! Dr. James, this is not a hint, okay? Calgon, take me away!!!

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class

When I read this anchor, something "clicked" in me. Dr. James said:"As a way of sharing self-witnessing reports and discussing the week's problems, there quickly developed a group solidarity feeling which allowed students to vent frustrations and strengthen each other in the face of fear of failure. They received no Internet instruction, were left to fend for themselves, yet were pressured by the requirement to turn in a documented bi-weekly lab report. This created a social atmosphere similar to that of a 'group project' facing a communal decline." That "clicking" inside of me when I read this, told me that all the hell that we experienced for the first weeks of class was necessary. Why? Because this created repertoire between everyone in class as well as igniting our cognitive and affective learning processes. In other words, we the students, are learning from each other on what we are experiencing on the Internet. When we first started in this class I thought that this was going to be like any other class where the professor is just going to lecture while we take notes and have a few class discussions. Boy, was I dead wrong!!! I was even banging my head against the wall on why I ever took this class in the first place! I thought that Dr. James was being too hard on us the first couple of weeks of school, because I perceived that he wanted us to learn the Internet instantly. Also, some of us felt computer illiterate (including me) and that we felt like retards when we made a lot of mistakes when we were first on the Internet. The way I see it, all the frustrations we went through (and probably still are going through) is all a part of the LEARNING PROCESS. Dr. James wanted us to go through this process so we could make discoveries. We are forever learning. We learn through our mistakes, our discoveries, and especially from other people. This is what life is all about! Looking back at the first weeks of school in this traffic psychology class, I'd say that we are doing fine, because we are being more open in class as well as getting used to the Internet.

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atmosphere

This anchor had put my feelings at ease when I read this. Dr. James wrote that his students felt comfortable in the difficult experiences they went through on this information superhighway. He indicated, "They discovered that it was normal to feel frustrated, angry and anxious when the task of logging on to unix with one's home modem,...becomes an hour-long, problem-solving chore with uncertain results." Indeed, this was what our first Internet experiences were like. In addition, he said that this "community learning atmosphere" creates a "contagion of enthusiasm from the few to the many." In other words, one optimistic person would encourage others to try out this Internet. As previously stated, we learn from each other when we talk about our Internet navigation. This creates a "bonding" kind of thing which is pertinent to our learning experience. I also have to add that this little community that we have in this classroom setting gives everyone support, encouragement, and empathy for one another. By admitting our irritations to each other, we get to know each other a little better. If there wasn't any group support in this class, then a lot of other people would have dropped this class without giving it a chance.

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week 8

Well, here is what I found in Dr. James' comments file. Check it out!

emacs

Dr. James said he loves emacs. see his comments He said this at the beginning of the semester, just 2 months ago. When I first came across this in his weekly comments file, I let out a sarcastic "HAH!!!" at the computer screen. Yes, I know that this is an abnormal thing to do to a computer screen, but I was feeling frustrated at the time. I was saying to myself, "How could he say that? He has no right to say this while all of us are ready to hurl the computer out the window and taking the Internet with it!". As we gradually got to know lynx, the telnet, and the emacs editor, then we felt more confident of ourselves in actually being able to survive in this class. We went through a lot of "madness" to get to where we are today, and looking back, I'd say experiencing the "madness" was worth it! I think the emacs editor is an alright program to use in writing up our lab reports, because it gets easier to use once you know the basic commands (i.e. control-x and control-c to save your document or control-d to delete a character.

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infoshock

"The experience of information shock is part of the normal and regular process of becoming information literate." I agree with this statement that Dr. James made see what he said .When I first came upon this term, my wild imagination thought that, "Information shock? Does that mean if we press a wrong button the computer will keep beeping on us until we get the right commands? Or will the computer actually zap us if we treat it badly? Hmmm...anything can happen!" But low and behold, information shock was the confusion, frustration, and the depression that we all experienced as part of becoming computer literate as well as being computer programmers. In this day and age, everything seems to be computerized. Technology is getting more and more advanced everyday. The upside of technology is that it has made advances in the health and medical field, as well as it helps us to live our lives much easier (i.e. faster cooking with a microwave, listening to clarity sounds on a CD player, etc.). The only downside I see in this situation is that computers have actually replaced people in terms of scarce job availability. What's even scarier is that what if one day all of humanity is wiped out and "the machines" are left behind? Would it be like the "Terminator" movies? Excuse me for turning looney, right now. I don't like to think this way, but anything is possible!

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week 9

Freedom...Freedom...Freedom...

Nope, this is not the chorus part of that George Michael song. In my opinion, my concept of the driving personality makeover is when you try to improve your driving skills by actually appreciating the privilege of driving. Remember that after taking the road test and the hand written portion of the driving exam, we as drivers had earned the right to drive. Yep, driving gives us a kind of freedom where we are in control of the car and the driving environment. It gives us that carefree feeling. But if driving is a privilege that's used recklessly, then this is where all the problems start. Okay, let's get away from this formal stuff on why we should appreciate driving and let's get down to business.

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How we really drive"

After taking a glimpse at Dr. James' files on the driving personality makeover, I was surprised! His files said that in order to become better drivers, we: must not swear or cuss; we should take criticism from our passengers in a noble fashion; we should wave, smile, and signal; we should not rush; and my personal favorite---we should not use the MIDDLE FINGER. Oh, come on! If we didn't use these little irritations that irk us every time (i.e. giving the finger, swearing, etc.) we would go crazy! Venting out our frustrations helps us to relieve some stress while we're driving. This is some kind of "release" that makes us feel better to "get it out." For me, swearing makes me feel better when some idiot cuts in front of me only to miss hitting my car by a matter of inches.As for taking criticism from my passengers, I talk back kindly or angrily. For example, when my mom tells me, "Slow down!", I say "What? I'm only going 5 miles over the speed limit...I'm only going 60!" or if I'm really angry, I tell her "JUST LET ME DRIVE, OKAY?". I know, I'm supposed to be nice to my mom, but I swear, she is the ultimate back seat driver! She criticizes how other people drive when they get into the car with her. But when I tell her how she's driving, she blames the other drivers for her driving; she doesn't realize how she herself is driving! I know, this sounds crazy, but she's my mom. I think if we follow these makeover hints, I'd say that at least half of us will go back to our "old ways" of driving. It's hard just to not be angry if we're being tailgated or if someone causes a near collision straight for our cars. I have yet to prove this, though. But to answer how this makeover is related to traffic psychology, it should help us to become better and more effective (as well as careful) drivers. See what Allison Asahina see Asahina's report has to say about venting.

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Am I an angel driver or a demon driver?"

Hmmm...I'd say I'm a little bit of both! I'm an angel driver when I wave at the other driver so he/she can go ahead of me when we both arrive at an intersection. I'm an angel driver when I stop to let pedestrians go even if they're not in a crosswalk. In addition, I'm an angel driver when I let people merge into my lane when it's rush hour (yes, I try to alternate between cars letting at least 1 or 2 drivers in my lane). These are some of the driving traits that one must consider to be a good driver. But I'm a demon driver when I find myself weaving in and out of traffic while going 65 or 70 miles an hour on the freeway. I even do this when I get impatient. I also go this fast on the freeway when I'm sometimes late for work. When another driver tailgates me, I keep going the same speed as I was going before, or I try to slow down just to irk him/her. Another one of my demon driving traits is when I let some of those jay walkers cross the street. I stop for them, but I slowly inch my way as they walk pass me. When they walk pass me, I just stare at them behind my sunglasses and scowl at them. When they notice this "iced look" I'm giving them, they move a little more faster. My "iced look" (this only works if you have extra dark sunglasses) always works, even when I encounter those smart-alecky pedestrians who just take their sweet time crossing in front of my car.

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How do I rate myself as a driver?

Hmmm...good question! I guess I'm sometimes a safe driver and sometimes I'm even a reckless driver. Whenever I have my friends in my car or when I have one of my family members in my car, I keep in mind their safety. I'm more attentive and I find myself concentrating extra hard. But when I'm driving by myself, that safety side of me disappears. When I'm driving alone, I feel free, because there's only me in the car. I tend to exceed the speed limit, I swear and get impatient more, and I blast the radio. So far, I've never been stopped by a cop yet for speeding; this means that my driving record remains clean. But I've had some parking warnings before.

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Transformation

How would I engineer a driving personality makeover for myself? Theoretically, I would first think positive when I'm driving. I would tell myself to calm down and to just relax and take my time, because my safety is very important. I would tell myself if someone tailgates me or if other drivers won't let me merge or cut in their lane, then I would breathe and tell myself to patiently wait until there's an opening in the lane. As for swearing while driving, I don't think I could handle not swearing.....swearing helps to release the anger that's building inside of me. As for speeding, I will only go the minimum speed limit whenever I spot a cop around or if I'm driving at night. My night vision isn't that great which is why I sometimes tend to drive at least 5 miles over the speed limit. Whenever I switch lanes, I would also physically turn my head to see if the lane is clear before entering it to avoid a collision with another car. I guess this is what I would do to improve my driving skills, but these are just THEORETICAL, because I tend to lapse in my old ways sometimes.

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pleasant experience

Here is what I wrote for the two-page we had to hand in on answering the question that Dr. James had asked us in class right before spring break: "What would make driving a more pleasant experience for you?" We also had to develop a driving changeover for ourselves, so here goes.

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Peace, dude!

What would make driving a pleasant, worthwhile, and peaceful activity? In my opinion, I think that if people would be a a lot more nicer and considerate on the roads, then driving would be a much easier and less nerve racking experience. For example, in the tailgating situation, it would be nice if we didn't do it so often. Or, if we do tailgate, it would be good if we let ourselves know we're tailgating, so we would stop scaring or irritating the person who's ahead of us. It's like we're invading the other driver's "personal space" on the road. Common sense tells us if we're being violated, then we do something about it physically (i.e. hit, punch, etc.) or verbally. If we ourselves don't like being violated, then naturally others wouldn't want to be violated either. As we discussed in class, if tailgating is being done intentionally just to make that other person move more quicker, then this is a discourteous act. In most cases, the person who's being tailgated isn't intentionally going slow; maybe he/she likes to drive this way because it's his/her choice. So if you're tailgating someone, mentally remind yourself that you should switch lanes and leave the other driver in peace, because you yourself wouldn't want to be in his/her shoes. On the other hand, if you're being tailgated, slowly step on the break pedal to let the other person know that they're irritating you. This one act will in turn irritate them, thus causing them to stop tailgating you.

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courteous

Another thing that would be nice is when people would be more courteous on the roads. A simple wave, a smile, or even a shaka sign may seem petty, but it does mean a lot. For example, I sometimes let the other person go first when I come to an intersection. I do this primarily to avoid a collision, because I don't want to damage my car. I didn't even know that letting the other person go first was considered a "gesture of goodwill" when I first learned to drive; I was taught that this was part of the rules of the road. In addition, smiling at another driver is good, in terms of making their day more pleasant.

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It's morphin' time!

How would I change myself in terms of my feeling, thoughts, and actions when it comes to making driving a more pleasant experience? When I go out driving, I would have a more positive and upbeat attitude. If someone intentionally cuts me off, then I would try not to get ticked off and to not take it personally. In my thoughts, I would tell myself to remain calm, relaxed, and be on the alert for traffic conditions. I would also tell myself to consider my own safety, as well as the safety of other drivers, so as to avoid any unnecessary accidents. If another drivers makes me mad, I would first start doing some deep breathing. Then, I would tell myself that he/she is just one of those reckless drivers who probably "BOUGHT" their licenses (instead of earning them) and don't know how to really drive. Thinking thoughts such as these makes me laugh, and thus helps me to chill out. In terms of my actions, I would try to relax my shoulders if I start feeling tensed; my shoulders are usually the first ones to start tightening up. When I'm in a hurry, I would indeed start speeding, but I would again consider that safety always comes first!

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prognosis

What is my long term prognosis for my successful changeover? I don't really know, because I'm a hard person to change when it comes to driving. I turn into my Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde personality when I'm driving. When I'm driving with my mom or dad in the car, I: try not to swear when another driver ticks me off; I try not to drive "too fast" for them; and I'm very alert of the traffic situation. But when I'm driving by myself or with friends, then that "good side" of me disappears. My "bad side" emerges when I start going 15 or 20 miles over the posted speed limit; I easily get agitated and I swear more than other drivers irritate me; and I sometimes tend to daydream when I'm driving, which makes me less alert about the traffic situation. There's no guarantee that I can ever become a better, reformed driver, because I sometimes tend to lapse back into my old driving habits (i.e. easily becoming anxious, swearing a lot, etc.). But I'll try, for my sake. Who knows, I may even have a clean driving record when I reach old age!

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worth

In conclusion, driving would be a worthwhile experience if we didn't tailgate people. Not tailgating someone would be good so that we wouldn't invade his/her driving space. Making a mental note to ourselves would be good too, if we're tailgating someone accidently/intentionally. From this action, we can learn to become better, reformed drivers. Being courteous, such as letting the other driver go when we're at an intersection, is also polite. This courteous act also helps to avoid a fender bender. Having a positive attitude, being relaxed, and most of all, remaining calm is also good to consider when making my driving changeover. Safety first is always important to keep in mind. Lastly, I'm not too sure what my long term prognosis would be for this successful changeover, because I'm a hard person to change. I also sometimes go into my Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde personality when I drive.

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BOMB THREAT!

"Folks, get out of the lab now...BOMB THREAT!" Yep, it's that time of year again when midterms are being given out and some idiot decides to call in a bomb threat...looking up from my computer here in Keller lab, I roll my eyes up and say "Oh, s---!". So I gather all my things get my card from the check-in/check-out station and head downstairs. Of all the worst times to have a bomb threat! I was rolling with ideas in the previous paragraph and now this had to happen! As I was sitting outside of Keller near one of those huge trees, I try to calm myself down. One of the students asked, "Won't those people standing right in front of those glass doors get blown away?" I start laughing as a few of the lab monitors and I are in total agreement with him. As I watch people pass by, my friend Amy comes along and asks if there is a bomb threat....judging from the way I'm looking at her with my what-do-you-think-eyes, I give her a nod. She told me that they won't open the building till noon (we were evacuated at about 11:10) so I said to myself, "What am I gonna do? Why me?" Then she told me that there's also the CLIC lab in Sinclair. I smile and say "Thanks!" to her and immediately head down there. When I arrived, there was a long line of students (from Keller no doubt) who also wanted to use the computers. When it was my turn, I asked one of the monitors if there was a waiting list for the IBM and he said no and immediately handed me a disk. After finding the computer that I was assigned to, it took me at least ten or fifteen minutes just to figure out why nothing was appearing on the screen.....so I turned on all the switches that I could find, then BAM****.....I was able to see some words on the screen! After getting through this obstacle, it took me another 10 or 15 minutes just to figure out how to get to the uhunix menu! I was getting even more frustrated! But after some manipulation in toggling back and forth on the screens, I'm finally here, right now, typing away on uhunix3.....sorry this paragraph is long, but I'm still venting out my frustrations!!!! To those idiot or idiots who made those bomb threats... don't you know that these don't work anymore? Some professors will still hold exams even though you make those calls! May God strike you down with lightning for inconveniencing the rest of us! I know, I'm getting vicious, but hey, I have the right to be!

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angry

I have to agree with this paragraph on anger. When all of us are out driving on the road, we can't help but get angry at those who cut us off or those who tailgate us. Affectively when we're driving, we tend to get upset. We hit the steering wheel or we start yelling at the other driver. Cognitively, our minds tell us that we have to calm down and chill out. Then in terms of our psychomotor behavior, we tend to do some heavy breathing or we start getting all tensed up because we are ready to explode. I also have to agree that our driving episodes really does affect our moods. For example, when the flow of traffic is going steady and I tend to pass all the green lights on my way to work, then I feel happy and satisfied. I feel like there's no interference. But when there's an accident, thus causing traffic to back up, then I get angry at the person who caused the accident. I don't care if he did something intentionally or the accident just happened unexpectedly.....he and his party are keeping me from getting to work! Then I calm myself down and pray that no one was seriously injured and that hopefully traffic will start moving really soon. I'm amazed at myself, because when it comes to encountering accidents on the road, I tend to blame the person or people involved in the accident for tying up traffic and holding everyone up. But then I tell myself that I shouldn't think this way because the accident may have been very serious and that people may have been critically hurt in it. At the the same time, I'm concerned that hopefully no one got hurt, in addition to praying that traffic will move soon so I can get to work.

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extreme stuff

These negative reactions experienced by witnesses seemed like the "normal" symptoms that all drivers experience. For physiological reactions, we feel cramps in our stomach, our hands sweat, and we feel nausea. Emotionally, we yell, glare, panic, and feel anxious. What I liked about this paragraph was the irrational thought sequences such as having revenge sequence dreams. I've done this several times while I'm out driving. If someone jaywalks in front of me, I just glare at that person; if that person starts yelling at me for almost hitting him/her, then I mentally blame him/her for jumping in front of my car, because it was their fault for not using a crosswalk in the first place. Note, I said "mentally blame" them, I don't physically roll down my window and start yelling at them because I don't want to have any more trouble on my hands. Then when he/she walks past my car, then I secretly play a sequence in my mind wishing that they would fall in a manhole or a pile of rubbish falls onto them. As for those aggressive drivers who almost hit me as they're zipping in and out of traffic at 80+ miles an hour, I play another revenge seeking sequence in my mind. This time, I wish that he/she would get chased by a motorcycle cop. He/she floors the gas pedal though, in order to getaway. Then one of their tires starts blowing out thus causing him/her to slow down. As he/she starts pulling aside onto the shoulder, he/she spots a dump truck also stopped on the shoulder. He/she is trying his/her hardest to stop their car but can't. The truck, meanwhile, is malfunctioning. The dumping carrier part of the truck is going hay wire and is moving at various slanting positions. The truck driver is trying to find a switch to stop the truck from going bonkers. Finally, the driver comes to a complete stop a foot away from the truck and luckily is safe from being decapitated. Then he/she looks in horror as the dump carrier slants at ninety degrees and a pile of horse manure comes crashing through his/her car. Not to worry, though, he/she is all right because by some act of fate, he/she is saved. The cop and his back-up buddies come by and sees all this and walks over to the passenger of the car. He/she is drenched in horse manure. The "radioactive" odor of the manure diffuses through the air as rapidly as smoke. The cop finds the driver and passes out because of the intense smell. All the other cops hold their breaths as they cuff the driver of the car and finally hauls him/her off to the police station for reckless endangering as well as resisting the police. Thus ends this dream sequence. What do you all think of this whacked revenge sequence, extreme, huh?

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week 10

Look...witness the amazing Carol!

In terms of convoy dynamics, I find myself doing several things: (1)when I'm in a convoy, I usually find myself at the head of it or in the middle of it. (2)when I'm driving in a convoy, my mind tends to drift off and my eyes tend to be transfixed at the license plate of the car that's in front of me (3) I am sometimes alert and I sometimes tend to tense up because I'm also trying to be careful not to tailgate in this convoy too. The worst thing that could happen in this convoy is if some other person is tailgating another. If that person follows the other closely and accidently crashes into that other person, then this might cause a chain reaction, resulting in a big pile-up on the freeway.

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How did I make my observations?

The way I approached my observations is that I sometimes engaged in self-talk. For example, when I realize that I'm driving in a convoy, I tell myself, "Oh geez...I'm driving in a convoooooyyy! Oh joy......". Or, when I've reached my destination, I tend to write things down and I try to record most of my thoughts and feelings. Most of the time, I drive by myself, because I have no brothers or sisters to make fun of me while I drive; most of the time, I drive myself to work, using my mom's car. Forget about using a little tape recorder, because I don't own one and I don't plan to! So the way I gathered my data is through writing down my emotions as soon as I reached my destination, or I engaged in self-talk (those inner conversations).

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How accurate were my observations?

I'd have to say that my observations were pretty accurate. Most of the things I wrote down were in tuned with what I observed myself doing while I was driving.

Carol's observations

What did I, Caroline Galapon Balatico, observe in this thing called "convoy dynamics"? When I am driving in a convoy, I find myself at the head of it or in the middle of it. When I'm at the front of a convoy, I sometimes feel that I have to set the pace. In other words, I feel like I have to keep the flow of traffic steady. In addition, I feel that I am the one in control of this convoy; I serve as the "leader" and I am "responsible" for the cars that are driving behind me. I guess that there is an advantage in driving at the head of a convoy, because there's only empty space in front of you, there's no obstruction, and in addition, there's no other car in front of you (unless some other car cuts in front of you at the last minute). Also, being the driver at the head of a convoy allows you to take note of traffic obstructions such as road work. For example, when the right lane is coned off, then other drivers riding behind you will take note of your actions and thus move into the next lane like you just did. You served as a look-out for hazardous road conditions in this convoy. When I'm in the middle of a convoy, I feel like I'm being suffocated because there's a car in front of me as well as in the back of me. I feel like I'm being wedged in between these two cars and there's no way out. I also feel like there's no space to move in this straight line formation. But on the other hand, there's also an advantage in being in the middle of a convoy. If there's a cop doing radar checks in this convoy, then he/she won't know who's going over the speed limit. Since there's a lot of cars in this convoy, it's impossible to tell which person is the speed demon. If I find myself being the last driver in a convoy, then I immediately switch lanes. I don't like being the last person because there's too many cars to follow and I feel that these cars are like regular traffic obstructions...they keep me from getting to my destination a lot faster.

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Implications for traffic psychology

Convoys in relation to traffic psychology deals with how we react while driving in these things. Observing how we act in a convoy will help us to become better drivers in terms of how to behave in it and how to deal with being in it. In terms of behavior, traffic psychology might say that we shouldn't get anxious or be angry while driving in a convoy. We should just calm ourselves down and just stay cool. Instead of being negative, we should look at the advantages of convoys. As I've said earlier, see what I said above the advantage of being in one is that you won't get caught by a cop. Or if you're traveling with friends or family in separate cars, and if you're not sure where your destination is located, then following each other in your cars prevents all of you from getting lost.

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driving style

Will my driving style change? Hmmmm....I'd have to say yes and no. Yes, to only driving at the head of a convoy because I'm the one that will set the driving pace in any way I please. On the other end of the spectrum, I'd have to say no, because when I find myself driving in convoys, I sometimes tend to get impatient (because I'm an efficient time freak) and thus tend to cut into the next lane to break myself away from this convoy so I can get to my destination faster. But when I find myself in another convoy the next time, I'll try to stay in it so I can observe more on how I act so I can cope with being in it a lot better (in addition to becoming a reformed driver later on).

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suggestions?

Well, I only have some suggestions for myself, because I can't think of any for other drivers right now. When I find myself in a convoy, I will tell myself to be patient...being patient will allow me to get to my destination i one piece. I will also try not to stress out when I find myself trying not to tailgate the driver in front of me. Sometimes, I do worry that I might hit the other driver because of my close driving. I will try to leave a car and a half space between myself and the other car in front of me, so as to prevent myself from tailgating that other car. And yes, my tailgating sometimes occurs because of my impatience.

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week 11

Another report?

Here goes my comments on the second generational curriculum paper for this class.....when I read Dan Ohama's report, it seemed like he was a very good observer on his driving skills, but on the other end of this spectrum, I wouldn't want to drive with this reckless driver! (Sorry, but this is what I really feel!). For example, when he is being tailgated, he looks in his rear-view mirror and tries to figure out what the tail-gater's intentions are. If they seem to be looking at him, he begins to think that they're not friendly drivers. As he continues to look through his rear-view mirror, he begins to have aggressive thoughts. He sees this situation as one where he's being challenged to a fight. He begins to slow down to encourage the tail-gater to overtake him. As the other driver changes lane to accelerate beside him, he also accelerates keeping his car beside the other driver's to prevent him/her from getting enough room in front of him to cut back in. If he/she gets in front of him, he starts to tail-gate him/her back even if he starts to exceed the speed limit!

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Cool me down!

Another example of his aggressive driving is when he explains that he doesn't have air-conditioning in his car. He said he can't afford it. His thoughts become irrational and he feels like a looser for not having air-conditioning in his car. He feels jealous at other drivers because their windows are rolled up and they have their air-con on. He starts blaming the ozone layer for causing the day to be too hot. He says he really blames the people who invented chemicals that caused the ozone layer to deteriorate; he said that these people should be shot! The danger comes when he can't handle the heat any longer and he starts to ignore traffic signs. He exceeds the speed limits and doesn't make appropriate stops at stop signs when there's no cops around. He also has thoughts of ramming his car into backed up traffic in front of him.

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What did I learn?

After reading this report, I learned that I myself would go crazy on hot days without any air-conditioning in my car. After reading his experience on driving without any air-conditioning, I felt like going out to buy the guy a new air-conditioner for his car, literally, so he wouldn't have to suffer on those scorching days! I know when I drive in hot weather, I easily get irritated with the littlest things like blaming the traffic light for taking too long in turning green, or I complain that the disc jockey on the radio should play my favorite songs so I can be happy again. I guess that the driving environment influences how we feel, which in turn, affects the way we drive. If we drive in warm, sunny (not too hot) weather, then we may feel happy and cheery. If we drive under cloudy skies right before it starts to rain, then we may feel dreary or unmotivated. But everyone does feel different, under different weather conditions.

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What did he learn?

I think that Mr. Ohama learned to take control of his emotions when he is driving. For example, his modification for encountering tail-gaters is that when he found himself being tail-gated, he did the right thing and pumped his brakes to let the tail-gaters know they were too close and he let them pass him. He said that he felt a tinge of anger initially, but he felt good about himself for acting calmly and staying in control of his emotions. His modification for his air-conditioning situation is that he keeps on reminding himself that noble people must be strong in order to stay in control of their emotions and behaviors. This gives him strength to keep himself from violating traffic laws when it's hot. He also believes that noble people don't violate traffic laws due to experiencing a little discomfort; he tells himself that noble people are mentally strong people. He said that although he doesn't have enough money to afford air-conditioning, he just has to continue to be stronger person and stay in control. He doesn't know who long he could keep this up, because it depends on how hot the situation becomes. He said that he may not be able to control himself on scorching days, and he may snap and may start breaking every traffic law.

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Yep, it does!

Mr. Ohama's report does fit the kind of material that we're learning in this traffic psychology class. How? He describes what his observations were when he's driving on the road, he observes what the other drivers are doing that are within his range of view, he wrote what his emotions were when he was driving, and he also wrote what he can do in order to improve his driving as well as how to modify his driving personality. What I liked about Mr. Ohama's report is that he put in every detail that he experienced in his driving so that his readers could feel what he actually went through.

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week 12

Tailgating legally

From what I got from our class exercise on tailgating, this term means that if you're closer than stopping distance (i.e. one car length) then you're "tailgating." Yes, everyone does tailgate when they're out on the road. I guess the legal side of tailgating is when you're causing a dangerous driving hazard (by driving too close) against another driver. Causing this kind of driving hazard may be intentional or accidental. By intentional, I mean that if you're very impatient and you "push" the other driver along by driving right behind their bumper causing them to get nervous and to speed up a little because they know you're right on their bumper. The key word in this intentional situation is "cause", because you really want the other drivers to hurry up so they can get out of your way. On the other hand, accidentally tailgating someone, in my opinion, means that in this same situation, you're rushing and you're not realizing you're tailgating the car in front of you. You don't really mean to tailgate, it just occurred this way.

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Tailgating morally

Morally, tailgating makes you feel better, but this is wrong. This is wrong, because you're causing harm to someone else because you don't like the way they drive, therefore, you get back at them by tailgating. You're interfering with someone's rights on the road. Violating someone else's rights on the road is caused by your intent. I also noticed that when we tailgate, it seems like we are claiming our territory or space on the road. This idea is self-serving and may be due to our egos.

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Tailgating spiritually

Spiritually, tailgating is wrong the way our conscience sees it, because it is a negative thing to do to someone else. Although I still don't understand Dr. James' concept of "heaven and hell", I'm assuming that if tailgating is a negative thing in this case, then the driver would go straight to hell(?) or God may cause something bad to happen to them for driving too close to someone else. I don't know if something bad will happen to the driver if they tailgate accidently, but definitely, if the driver maliciously tailgates with intent, then something bad may happen to them. Who knows, maybe their souls will go straight to hell if they keep on doing bad things on the roads. But on the other end of the spectrum, if the driver realizes that they're tailgating someone and slowly eases up on the gas pedal, then God is allowing them to redeem themselves. This kind of gives the driver a new lesson (i.e. improving their driving makeover) that they've learned through this act. Thus, in the end, when they're time has come then maybe God will grant them a second chance to come back in another life form. Okay, this is getting silly, but this is the way I view Dr. James concept of "heaven and hell" while driving on the roads.

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A sign of the times

In my opinion, it seems like tailgating is a sign of the times. It indicates a time of impatience, greed, and aggressiveness. It produces the concept of "survival of the fittest"; the one who gets their way are the "strong ones". All the others who don't survive or fend for themselves are considered "the weak." Whatever happened to being patient, being nice to others, and accommodating other people? It seems like we've forgotten who we are; we are human beings learning and growing everyday, trying to explore life. When we tailgate to do harm to someone, it's like we're turning into "monsters" who keep doing bad things until we get our way. We should stop and really take a good look at ourselves and see why we act alone on the roads rather than cooperating with other drivers. After we do this re-evaluation, then we can achieve our goal of becoming better reformed, and safer drivers.

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week 13

aggressive intro

What Lisa Menor wrote about in her lab report was aggressiveness on the road and driving behavior. She was interested in why other drivers, including her, would drive aggressively during traffic jams. She wanted to know what caused motorists to scream or rant at other motorists during traffic jams on the freeways. She also wanted to know if these aggressive characteristics could be identified before any dangerous behavior could result, in addition to finding ways to lessen these problems.

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definitions of aggression

In her report, she found that Baron defines aggression as "any form of behavior performed with the intention or goal harming another living being who is motivated to avoid harm." In other words, aggression means that a person plans and carries out a behavior in order to hurt another person who doesn't want to be hurt. Aggressive behavior in traffic would be trying to force another driver off the road to get back at them for going in front of you. Eric Fromm, in her report, describes two types of aggression: biologically adaptive/life-serving and malignant. An example of the first aggression would be when someone follows you too close and you suddenly brake hard to scare the driver. The second aggression would occur when you cut another driver off just to get to the faster lane. Environment does indeed play a large role in how aggressive a driver can become. For example, if the weather is hot and humid, the driver may be easily frustrated or angered, leading to aggressive behavior. Another determinant of whether or not a person will resort to aggressive behavior is the emotional state of the driver. A motorist who is unhappy, angry, or upset could be more sensitive to threatening behavior. The key to safe driving is not only applying your physical driving skills, but the ability to think about what is happening on the road and to act decisively and skillfully in order to avoid trouble.

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forms of aggression

An example of the anti predatory aggression type is when you feel threatened as if you are being "hunted" by another driver (predator)> You, as the hunted, react aggressively to this stimulating situation and you might ignore other drivers rights in order to eliminate the predator's threats. Territorial form of aggression would be when you refuse to allow a car to go in front of you, or you try to warn the car behind you to back away by pressing quickly on the brakes. This is like guarding your territory or space and to discourage others from entering your space. Dominance aggression is when a challenge is initiated and there's a reward at the end, such as the fastest car or the best looking car on the road. This involves one's ego or pride, resulting in the aggressive behavior. Fear-induced aggression is when you are surrounded on all sides by slow-moving trucks, and you feel locked in and unable to escape. Your reaction might be to keep trying to force your way out of the situation.

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aggression reactions

I did agree and learn that driving in traffic may be upsetting and sometimes frustrating, but these situations are predictable. I say that if you anticipate that you may not drive well or you're not going to be able to react to a certain traffic situation, then you must do something about it; otherwise, the potential for experiencing aggressive behavior may likely increase. I also found it interesting that if you, the driver, are driving well, then you decrease your chances of angering other drivers. You lessen your mistakes by concentrating on your own driving. The other drivers may make mistakes accidently or may do something stupid, but you become less sensitive and more patient. We also have to keep in mind that as drivers, we must realize that all of us are the same. From my personal experience, and also from what Ms. Menor said, ranting helps to alleviate the stresses of driving. Instead of keeping it in and letting the "internal turmoil" (i.e. fantasizing about running over other drivers, etc.) take over, verbally releasing one's frustrations works as a reliever. In this case, you're not physically doing harm to anyone.

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What Lisa Menor learned

Lisa Menor conducted some field observations on her driving behavior by using a self-witnessing approach. She jotted down her feelings, thoughts, and behaviors in a notebook. In addition, she recorded the frequencies of how aggressive she felt, ranging from mild annoyances to murderous feelings and irrationality. After she actually started to record her feelings of aggression and hostility, she never realized that she was consistently irritated and had flare ups. She found that she was more prone to reacting aggressively when it was hot, or if she was in a rush. Her behavior was unpredictable when she had other stuff on her mind, which distracted her from concentrating on the road. The aggressive behavior she displayed was due to her own emotions and actions. On the affective level, she found herself fearing that she might hurt someone, feeling alert, desiring to see another motorist suffer a bad fate, and making it through a trip without having any hostile or aggressive feelings. Cognitively, her thoughts were often of planning how to avoid traffic, justifying her own actions and mistakes, and telling herself to don't let things bother her. She found it hard to think, "That's not my problem, just let it go, God will take care of them." This definitely wasn't easy for her. She found it easier to think, "It's their fault." or "They deserved it." She told herself that she had to realize that her expectations for herself and for others may be faulty and she needs to re-evaluate this. On the sensorimotor level, she found herself not following the car in front of her as closely as she did before. She also stepped on her brakes more often as she normally did. Her recommendations for herself is that she must prepare herself to deal with the weather, her emotions, and the behavior of other drivers around her. She also may try a good self-regulatory statement to help her to modify her behavior during traffic congestion. This self-regulatory statement will also help to lessen her potential for aggressive behavior on the freeway during rush hours.

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aggression and traffic psychology

From what I got from this report, driving in traffic congestion can bring out frustration and anger in even the most calm and peaceful driver. The key to driving safely is being able to not let those dangerous feelings and thoughts lead to aggressive behavior in your thoughts, actions, or feelings. There are lots of ways to lessen the potential for aggressive behavior. Ranting helps; this is when you verbally say something to yourself which makes you feel better. Ranting also helps to get your aggressive thoughts out, instead of endangering another person. Instead of driving like you own the road, relax and know that traffic rules and regulations are for the benefit of society. Focusing on your own driving rather than looking for the failures and mistakes of others also helps. Minimizing insecurities within ourselves and taking control of our environment and control systems (in us) helps to alleviate aggression. We should recondition ourselves and our behaviors as we drive in traffic.

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week 14

Clean Vehicles and Fuels for British Columbia

This policy paper on Clean Vehicles and Fuels for British Columbia Clean Vehicles and Fuels for British Columbia discusses the air pollution from cars. Policies, regulations, and standards for this Clean Vehicles and Fuels Program are being developed. With these efforts, this paper hopes to reduce air pollution by improving fuels and encouraging the development of more efficient and less polluting vehicles.

Winter Driving in the Sierra Nevada

This is about winter driving on the roads and highways in the gorgeous snow country of Sierra Nevada Winter Driving in the Sierra Nevada . It gives tips on how to prepare your car before heading for the road like making sure you have antifreeze in preparation for the cold temperatures. In addition, it gives driving tips, road delays, and closures. Have fun in this winter wonderland!

Introduction to The Sports Car Club of America

Interested in sports cars? Introduction to The Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) I'm sure everyone is! This club is one of the premier bodies for amateur auto sports in the U.S. This club sponsors club and pro road racing activities, Autocross, and rally. If interested, in competing in these events, you must be a member. Check it out!

Hands On Music, Inc.

Music and having an excellent sound system helps to relieve some of the frustrations and pains of driving. With this corporation, Hands On Music, Inc. they are the first ones to record and master those beautiful music notes to best suit your car audio system. You can get "Roadmusic: Driving Beverly Hills" on CD for just $9.95; what a deal!

Volvo-Home Page

If you have money and want to show off your wealth, then buy a Volvo! This Volvo Home Page Volvo-Home Page shows Volvo's continued tradition of combining luxury, safety, and high performance for its cars; the new series for 1995 is a must see!

Clippership Motorhomes

Want to get away from your everyday lives for a short while? Then pack up your things and rent a motorhome! Clippership Motorhomes You can travel the open road with these Clippership Motorhomes and make yourself "one with nature" again! These are equipped with bathroom/shower, double sink in a kitchenette, range, refrigerator, and comfortable beds to name a few. All your utensils are included at no extra cost! They even offer free airport or hotel transportation to their office in Anchorage! This is a cool deal!

Kerhop's STUNTS Page

Feel like racing? Well, check this one out Kerhop's STUNTS Page ! This is a software program that allows the browser to choose a vehicle and race the clock as many times as he/she wants. One can race with another just by playing with this virtual race track program.

The Pickup Truck Homepage

For those of you dreaming of a pickup truck as your dream vehicle, check this home page out The Pickup Truck Homepage . Here's a small piece of trivia: did you know that almost half of the vehicles sold in the U.S. are trucks? It's true! My dad has a Toyota and it's very convenient when we need to move some things around. Personally, I'd like a Nissan Pathfinder instead!

Auto Express on the Web

Hunting for a new car? Then check this out! Auto Express on the Web Instead of going out into the hot sun looking for your dream vehicle, look for it on the Internet. Shop for your car at the press of a button! This also guarantees "low bottom line prices"! Choose from a variety of vehicles such as Toyota, Mazada, or Volvo and be amazed!

Critical Mass

This motor-free zone involves a bunch of cyclists reclaiming the roads for an hour every month. Critical Mass This event has been going on for a year in Cambridge, London and it spread to San Francisco. It would be cool if there were no cars, trucks, or buses on the streets because it will decrease air pollution. Imagine everyone on bicycles for a while....what a concept!

week 15

My web pages

I'd say that my web pages seem decent compared to others. I think I've written an adequate amount of pages and the quality of my entries are honest and straightforward; some seem even hilarious because I've had some crazy moments during this semester. For example, check out my "bomb threat" see it and my "extreme stuff" see this too! entries!

I accomplished the web!

Well, I'd have to say that it took many hours in the computer lab, some feelings of hurling the computer out the window, putting eye drops in my eyes to relieve eyestrain, and some moments of going insane trying to figure out how to think like a computer, in order to form these web pages. All of this hard work was worth it, because now, I'm excited about using the web system! There really is a lot of interesting an some weird stuff floating around out there! I just wish I had a modem at home so that I could explore this Internet system more!

The next generation

My advice for the next generation of students coming into this cyberspace community is that everything may seem confusing at first, but it will all pay off in the end! Motivate yourself into pushing that "iffy" keyboard button, even if you accidently delete something without even knowing it! You may be swearing at the computer many times, but through all these bad times, you will be learning something! Oh yeah...make friends too even if you have to play "kiss up" in the beginning; it helps to have a bunch of people going through the same experience as you are! My last word of advice: ASK GOD FOR LOTS AND LOTS OF PATIENCE! In addition, I think that there should be awards for most creative home page and that everyone in class should e-mail each other even if they don't know each other.

Happy, happy, joy, joy

I am definitely happy with what I've accomplished this semester! See what I said above elevate!. All the bad times were joyful (ha, ha)! But seriously, if I had to do all this again, I would! What future do I see for myself on the WWW? I would love to maintain my unix account but this is just wishful thinking...after graduation is over (after being here for 5 years), I'm going on vacation to Chicago and play tourist for a while! But maybe in the near future (when I come back for grad school1) I plan to have another e-mail and unix account. I love exploring Netscape because there are so many unknown stuff out there that I need to see!

From root to plant

When I first started this class, memories of statistics class came back to haunt me...when I took statistics last semester, I had the hardest time making up my computer programs in addition to running them! When I walked through the entrance of Crawford Hall, I thought "Yay, traffic psychology, we're going to learn about driving stuff! Piece of cake!". After that first orientation day, I got hit by those computer memories from last semester. Although I wasn't too thrilled about learning computers (again), I hung in there! I also needed this class because I needed this 4X9 requirement i order to graduate; going through all the hassle of changing classes was out of the question! I felt like I didn't know anything about computers in the beginning, but I motivated myself into going to the computer labs everyday. I even deleted some stuff, accidently of course, but I learned something new! I see myself now as knowing some things about computers and I'm very motivated in making up new computer programs (i.e. finding icons, linking to others, etc.) while on the web.

Dr. Jaaammmeeesss!!!

Dr. James, my advice to you for your next cyberspace classes is that on that first orientation day, give your students some how-to instruction sheets on how to begin once they sit in front of the computer. Having these instruction sheets serves as a foundation so your students know where to begin. Also, I'm sorry to say this, but please get off from your "academic throne" and put yourself in your students shoes. I know that some of us in class throughout the semester didn't want to come to you for help because it seemed like you looked at our mistakes as something VERY TABOO! When you asked us what we did wrong and when we didn't write it down (because we weren't sure what happened), it was like you looked at us as if we were dumb or something. This is why I say that you should come down to your students' level...in this way, more of your future students will be more open to you as well as in class when they encounter mistakes on the computer. Other than this, I think you're a cool guy (love your multi-colored cap, for real!) and you should continue building your generational cyberspace superdocument!

preservation

I think that our generation's files should be saved and filed away in some archive! Deleting all our hard work would be a BIG MISTAKE! It's like erasing our memories of what we went through in this class! In addition, preserving our files would make us IMMORTALIZED in the cyberspace community; we would live on forever! I also hope that our files would allow future generations access to it, so they could see what we did in this class. As I said previously, I plan on revisiting the cyberspace community hopefully in the near future when I attend grad school! I have no idea what will happen in terms of the exponential growth (in my opinion) in this cyberspace community; but I believe that it will be exciting!

Your Eyes are the Windows to Your Soul

Sounds like some sorta psychic thing, yeah? In case you all didn't see my promotion in my glossary, here it is again:
If you need an eye exam (you're supposed to get one every year, just like your painful dental visits; only thing an eye exam is really painless), stop by at the eye doctors' office inside Lenscrafters at Ala Moana. Call us at 941-1566 to make an appointment.

Yep, I'm a doctor's assistant and I want to make sure your eyes are fine, especially pounding away on the computer doing Dr. James' assignments for oh so many hours! I usually work there on the weekends, so if you want to watch me in action or to drop by to say "Howzit!" feel free, okay? Oh yeah...if you're going to Ala Moana, check out what I have to say about the courtesy parking ticket beware!

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