Quotations from the Works of

Leon James with Diane Nahl

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The unconscious connections between the affective states and their sensorimotor instantiations are established by two human growth mechanisms where the cognitive is as-if bypassed, and feelings or emotions trigger sensations and acts that remain unconscious to the individual, but is visible to others.   One is the formation of basic personality habits, moods, and temperaments in childhood prior to the talking phase or not much further beyond (up to age 4 on the average).  The other is from automaticity of habits that were conscious in their formation and early use, but sunk into the unconscious due to cessation of conscious monitoring.  Examples are:
  • the gate or manner of walking
  • the facial expressions that accompany conversation
  • the characteristic manner of reacting to some things that others can witness
  • the way we drive (aggressive, competitive, supportive)
  • our ethnic traits (religion, eating, lifestyle, political ideology, discourse patterns)

As individuals mature over the decades, a series of sensorimotor instantiations are triggered in relation to sequence and biographical teleology or spiritual fate known to God who directs the progression in its least details.    without this divine intelligent and purposive management, the teleology would be impossible and the entire scheme would be sytematically downgraded by the second universal law of thermodynamics (chaos).  But the opposite actually takes place:   less chaos, more order towards an ideal goal or end.  This end has been revealed to us by God--see my article on dualism in science.

This process of unconscious, sequenced, and ethnic sensorimotor instantiations can be called GENETIC CULTURE.   Objective methods of investigating genetic culture include:

self-witnessing methods involving

community-classroom methods involving

methods of community cataloguing practices involving

GENETIC
CULTURE:
THE
NEW
PARADIGM
FOR
SOCIAL
PSYCHOLOGY

 

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Lenneberg's influence on me through his well received Biological Foundations of Language (19 ) was decisive in clarifying in my mind earlier misconceptions I gained through an uncritical acceptance of the ideas or Bruner and Roger Brown on cognition and semantics. Lenneberg's precise style and easy clarity transmitted to me the distinction I needed to draw between the proposition that words tag things versus words tag the cognitive practices of a community. Osgood, Bruner, and Brown, perhaps because they tended to denigrate the Skinnerian insights as simpleminded, failed to grasp this distinction in all their writings; possibly, too, the "words tag things" proposition seems more in tune with S-R habit theory, and indeed Staats, for one, went on from Hull and Osgood to develop this S-R approach as a behaviorist)account of "complex mental processes" and socialization (see his recent Social Behaviorism. 197 ).

Lenneberg's notion that words tag cognitive Practices echoed in me to hook up with my reading of Skinner's Verbal Behavior and his definition of verbal as operant that are maintained by community Practices. At the same time, my reading of Austin and Searle and Vendler (on whose course I sat in during the LSA Summer Linguistics Seminar at Illinois in 1968) gave me an entirely new perspective on "data". They showed me what I had failed to understand from linguistics, namely that "linguistic context" frames "linguistic content", or in later perspective, "situated sentences" derive their interactional (still later: transactional) significance from the setting. It is at that point of my theoretical development that I met Barbara Gordon.

LENNEBERG'S
BIOLOGICAL
THEORY
OF
MIND

 

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In what follows, I shall present samples of conversational interactions   with my son Rex  at a time just prior to his third birthday, specifically during his 34th month of life. In general, Rex's motor and language development appear to have followed the typical pattern described by Lenneberg (1957, Table 4.1), although his motor development was somewhat slower and his language development somewhat faster than those norms would indicate. All conversational interactions presented here are based on verbatim records written down as they occurred or a few seconds after they occurred. We made no effort to be either comprehensive or representative, but simply wrote down interactions whenever it was convenient to do so, or whenever a particular interaction appeared at the time to be noteworthy for a number of reasons that are not particularly relevant for our present purposes. Although we have no documented evidence to support this claim, it is our strong impression, corroborated by his mother's judgment, that these recorded interactions were "typical" of Rex's utterances at this stage of development.

A cursory inspection of these verbal interactions (see Appendix) reveals the general character of Rex's conversational rules at this stage of his development. one of the most striking aspects of these records is that, with virtually no exceptions, Rex's verbal interactions are one-topic conversations. This is not an artifact of the method of record keeping. At this stage, Rex shows no evidence of engaging in multiple-topic conversations typical of adults. If the verbal interaction is initiated by the adult, the child might participate in the ordinary fashion, but without making any attempt to pursue the interaction beyond the specific topic raised by the initiator, and will typically allow the interaction to lapse into silence unless the adult once again chooses to initiate a topic switch. The same holds true for interactions initiated by the child himself. One possibility occurs to us to account for this pattern. It may be that, at this stage, the child has not acquired any adult rules relating to topic switches in conversational interaction and thus allows the verbal interaction to lapse into silence. Adult conversational interaction - under ordinary conditions contains a prohibition rule against silence, and various devices are typically used to move from one topic of discourse to the next (e.g., Incidentally . . .; By the way . . .; This reminds me of . . .; So, what else have you been doing?...; And how is.. ., or And how are you . . .; I hear that . . .; Did you read about . . .; etc., etc.). There isn't a single occurrence of these topic switch devices in Rex's speech at this stage of his development.

The lack of topic switch rules either contributes to or is merely correlative with a number of other features of Rex's conversations that contrast with adult conversations. The sample interactions being considered here are dramatically single-minded and purposeful. There is no "beating around the bush," small talk, innuendo, or indirect expression of intent. These interactions are in a direct representa- tional style, and Rex pursues his conversational intent with a striking bluntness that can appear to the adult embarrassing, if not sanguine, in its directness and unpretentious simplicity.

 

DEVELOPING
TRANSACTIONAL
ENGINEERING
COMPETENCE

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D. Platonic Transcendentalism: (as expressed in German by Ritter, 1931, and quoted in English by Lovejoy on p.36)

"the Platonic Idea is the expression of the simple thought that every rightly formed conception has its solid basis in objective reality"

The notion of trans-cending refers to the individual's real capacity (at any time and in any place) to cognize objective knowledge about the world without directly experiencing. Since experiencing implies a time-bound process, the transcendental contact is outside its scope, hence the image of trans-cending or going beyond the here/now to the timeless eternal or Platonic Absolutes. (1)

[Note: 1: Note that Ritter's "objective reality" and the conventional reference to "Platonic Absolutes" echo in many contemporary versions: e.g., in the Physical Sciences as Universal Laws or Elemental Particles or Absolute Constants; in the Social and Behavioral Sciences they are tagged "Principles" and "Laws" of Psychology or of Social Institutions and of Historical Forces and Economic Pressures. All of these notions, that are dynamic to topicalization (as evidenced by what we talk about on our daily rounds, and think...) designate a common ethnodynamic, i.e. a socio-cultural enactment: countless numbers of individuals over the centuries have in all sorts of places displayed this transaction of reciting the Platonic Transcendentalistic Lines, each in their own species of style of personal dramatizations. We might say that the thoughts of the people are so many particular renditions of one generic idea, see the discussion on VERSIONS in The Secret Code, James and Nahl, TEC, 1974; see also, "The Open Cube" and "Navigational Phenomena" in NES, 1975).]

E. According to Ritter, as quoted by Lovejoy who labels it as "essentially wrong", Plato's Platonism asserts only that: "A general concept is the result of an act of classification; and a classification is correct if 'it is not purely subjective, but has a basis in the objective relations of the things classified,' if it presents together a complex of properties which actually occur together in nature, in that particular collection of existing things to which we give a single name, and 'is not a combination put together merely by our fancy out of elements which experience, indeed, furnishes separately, but not in such association'." (Lovejoy, p. 36; single quotation marks enclose Lovejoy's references to Ritter.) This characterization by Ritter-Lovejoy, as it may be called, amounts to a proposal on how to objectify cataloguing practices in a scientific inquiry of topicalization dynamics in human discourse as evidenced by literary history. This issue comes up in ethnosemantics in such methodological concerns as we have in transcripts and reports as genuine representations of something else (viz. TOPICALITY) or as performative enactments having a primary function in their transactional significance (viz. RITUAL); (for a discussion on the duality of TOPIC vs. RITUAL, see Jakobovits/Nahl: The Secret Code, TEC, 1974). Briefly, if the evidenced text is to be understood literally, the reader or interpreter must supply the stage directions or transactional climate that sufficiently and pragmatically reconstructs the natural events they relate. This process is usually designated as "objective description", which is contrasted with "subjectivity" or the dramatized personal interpretations that are given as a performative enactment to an audience. Hence, objective cataloguing practices (as in the preparation of ethnosemantic glossaries, see NES, 1976) depend on "acts of classification" that are "actual" rather than "fanciful", functional rather than imaginary, objectively representational rather than subjectively particular, etc. These oppositions of traits correspond to the duality of topic as reflection and claim (see TOPIC FUNCTION in NES, 1976). The function of topic as transactional claim offers a primary tool for the exploitation of controlled enactments as transactional engineering strategies.

F. A Hexagram of Platonic Affirmations based on Ritter-Lovejoy: (pp. 40-41):

(1) White: It is the most indubitable of all realities;

(2) Yellow: It is Good in It-self and all other things participate in It's Nature (changelessness as frame for Changes);

(3) Green: It is the polar opposite of this-here or that there (Contemplation of that which is.-- (see Buddha's Bible:"mere witnessing").


T H E   D O U B L E   L I N E


(4) Blue: Far from being identical with reality, It actually transcends that in dignity and potency.

(5) Brown: The Forms of It are the manifestations of the universal object of desire, that which draws all spiritual endeavors towards It-self.

(6) Black: The chief good of man is the more contemplation of nothing but It.

“The attributes of such a God (as It) were, in strictness, expressible only in negations of the attributes of this world. You could take, one after another, any quality or relation or kind of object presented in natural experience, and say, with the Sage of the Upanishad: 'The true reality is not like this, It is not like that' - adding only that It is far better" (Lovejoy, p. 42). (On this, cf. the Judaic Hassidic attitude towards the indescribability and unknowability of "The Holy One in Heaven" or of The Holy Name's Plan; see also: Notes on Raising Awareness, James/Nahl, 1975: indexical entries on: PRAYER; HAVING A GESTURE WITH ACTUALITY; RECITATION OF I AM THE ONE; LITERALNESS; SPIRITUAL Work); (see also: The Metaphysics of Nothingness and, The Performative Paradox, TEC Materials Series #5 and 11, respectively).

PLATO'S
PLATONISM
AS
ETHNOSEMANTIC
FRAMEWORK

 

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Because the external churches bicker among each other they give an appearance of disagreement, antagonism, enmity, and strife.  The Writings they hold as sacred vary and the history of the world they give (or their eschatology) often contradict each other.  Many believers hold that their version only is correct and genuine and doubt the salvation of others.  This external appearance of varieties of religions and their doctrinaire contradictions vanishes in the internal operation of the Church within every person on this earth.  The inner Church is universal and absolute though it grows and develops in stages within each person.  All human beings belong to the internal Church and there are no human beings who are devoid of it irrespective of their beliefs or awareness.  Individuals of all denominations and individuals who deny any religious affiliation all belong to the inner Church by Divine order.  The inner Church grows within each person under the careful and constant supervision of God.  It is an organic relationship of the spirit of each person.  Religious psychology explores this universal inner Church.

There are three stages of growth of the Church within each person.  We may refer to them in order as first, the Old Church, second, the New Church, and third, the ultimate Church.  The three Churches develop within us in that order.  The Old Church is the basis and continuant of the internal Church upon which the other two rest.  The Old Church is born within each child when the child is told about God, sin, and the life after death.  The New Church is added when the individual returns to religious life as an adult.  This happens because adolescence and early maturity turns off the operation of the Church within us.  When we return to religious life as an adult we do so from our own reason and free will, from rational decision and personal confirmation of the importance of God in our life.  While the Old Church appears to us severe and restrictive in its Commandments, the New Church is experienced with positive affections and freedom; its New Commandment is more rational and inviting, more to our liking and philosophical inclinations.  We fear the Old Church while we love the New Church.

SWEDENBORG'S RELIGIOUS PSYCHOLOGY

 

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This series of articles is intended to outline the psychology of religious life as viewed from self-inspection.  These contain observations of the inner life of self as viewed from the light of the Word.  All of us have an inner life which is personal, intimate, familiar; yet it is not as readily available to observation as the interpersonal environment is.  Think of the objects around us we can all see and the sounds we can all hear entering us through our external senses.  These we can easily describe or communicate or agree upon.  Even some rational things which cannot be seen with the external senses are easily communicable and discussible.  Think of our many exchanges on abstract topics like politics, or legislation, or literary criticism, or scientific writings: none of these is physical or material that can penetrate through the external senses.  Rational things of this sort are part of the interpersonal world and we readily observe them and can discuss them.

    But there is also a category of rational things that is not easily observable or discussible.  These are not from the inter-personal world, but from the personal and intimate world of the individual's inner life.  This inner life is made up of our sensations, emotions, thoughts, reasonings, ideas, feelings, desires, attractions, affections, and loves.  This inner life has content and it has dynamics.

    The content of inner life is describable or knowable through titles we readily give to any event in our experience, or to any quality we observe.  Think of what you are doing now, or were doing a few seconds ago.  One might say, for instance, that "I was writing," or that “I was listening to the sound of cars going by outside," or that "I was readjusting my body position on the chair," or that "I was wondering where this line of reasoning will lead me," and so on.  One may intuitively grasp this idea of the content of inner life by thinking of a library.  It is not only stacked with books and periodicals but it is also arranged in a certain order.  This order is describable or knowable through a catalogue.  As we search through the catalogue of a modern academic library we are faced with a definite order of topics and their interconnections or cross-references.  By getting to know this order, or cataloguing system, we can find any book or periodical we want;  we can find any article on any topic, and thus we come into contact with the intellectual history and culture of our nation and of the human race.
 

    We can say therefore that in order to get to know our inner life we need to study the available information, that is, its content.  But this content may not be available in the books or periodicals of a library.  We need to observe the content of our own intentions, reasonings, and emotions.  In the language of modern psychology, we need to observe our motives, our cognitions, and our sensorimotor behaviors in everyday living.  By observing and taxonomizing, or cataloguing, this living information on our inner life we can construct theories and models that can explain the interconnections in this inner life.  For example, a theory can show that the thoughts we have are aroused and guided by the feelings we have, and it can further investigate the origins of these feelings, perhaps relating the feelings to deeper affections of character or personality.  At this point, with the help of theory, we begin to perceive a new content not seen before.  This is a higher content, still more rational, yet real and perhaps more crucial.  We may think of this deeper content of inner life as the dynamics of it, pictured as follows:  (continued in original)

SWEDENBORG'S RELIGIOUS PSYCHOLOGY

 

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Radicalism is a philosophy that concerns itself with the essence of the origin. It stands in contrast with progressivism, which is a philosophy that concerns itself with directional accumulation. Radicalism and progressivism are radically opposite systems, that they embody contradictory sets of premises. The historical account of Western Civilization, as traditionally given in academic texts, is in a register that presuppose progressivism. Technological developments and scientific theory both presuppose progressivism in the notion of "progress" and "advancement". There is an evaluative component to progressivism as illustrated by the usual contrast between "traditionalism" (seen as anti-progressive and undesirable) and "modernism" (seen as progressive, forward looking, and desirable).

    Radicalism, however, is to be distinguished from traditionalism. Historically, radicalism is associated with reactionary movements in spiritual and socio-political endeavors. This is a historical fact, not a logical necessity. In an age where radicalism is predominant ant traditional (as during the end of the Middle Ages in Europe), progressivism may develop as a new and reactionary endeavor (e.g. the Renaissance Movement in art). On the other hand, Luther's Reformation was both radical in content and reactionary in its socio-political scope. Given the current prevalent progressivism in American psychology, the present proposal is similarly both radical and reactionary.

    Radicalism presupposes a centralist generic model. In its current form, as proposed here,it is generative as well. All elementary assertions in English take the following form:

X is Y

and we are assuming that other natural human languages contain an equivalent linguistic construction in their underlying structure, if not also in their surface expression.

    The English predicate to be, in its surface form, has several homonymous usages with different underlying structures. In the presentation that follows, we shall use the predicate to be as an illustration of the variety of elementary assertions, only one of which is of the radicalist type. We caution the reader not to confuse radicalist assertions with the syntactic surface form of sentences. The following represent particular illustrations, not definitions.

RADICALIST
PHILOSOPHY:
ESSAYS
ON
NOTHING
AND
EVERYTHING

 

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Type of assertion Characteristic evaluation Basis of evaluation
1. Definitional proper - improper authoritative - pronouncement
2. Categorizing adequate - inadequate operational Justification
3. Descriptive corroborated - disconfirmed-uncorroborated consensual validation
4. Radicalist comprehensible - incomprehensible radical understanding
5. Objectifying authentic - inauthentic radical observation
6. Subjectifying true - false inferential reasoning
7. Vacuous correct - incorrect encyclopedic knowledge
8. Nonsensical sensible - not sensible elementary logic

RADICALIST
PHILOSOPHY:
ESSAYS
ON
NOTHING
AND
EVERYTHING

 

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The radicalist position asserts that the whole is contained in the part, that complicity is derivable from elementarism. The progressivist position asserts that the whole is greater than the part, that the characteristics of compounds are not derivable from the properties of the elements. Let us inquire into the fundamental logic underlying these two contradictory assertions.

    The statement that "the whole is contained in the part" (radicalist position) is a radicalist assertion, as defined above in the first section. As such it is either comprehensible or incomprehensible depending on the radical understanding of the evaluator. m e statement that "the whole is greater than the part" (progressivist position) is a vacuous assertion. It will be judged "correct" on the basis of the evaluator's shared encyclopedic knowledge (e.g. about chemical compounds). Thus, progessivist logic is both cumulative and directional - cumulative as symptomized by an expanding encyclopedia and, directional, as symptomized by "a school of thought" which may be different in a variety of respects from "another school of thought."

    The radicalist position is neither cumulative nor directional. It does not necessitate the gathering ant storage of facts and opinions (as is the case of an encyclopedia), nor does it permit "schools of thought" since radical perception, observation, and understanding are direct and unmodifiable by other considerations.

    The concept of "liberation" (in the spiritual awakening sense) will serve as a convenient illustration here. A progressivist perspective sees "liberation" analogously to "the goal of training." Through various instructional strategies (e.g. Yoga or Zen or Ascetic disciplines), the trainee goes through a series of exercises graded along a line of advancement. When enough progress has been made, the trainee reaches the last step (e.g. cosmic insight) and he is then so to speak "liberated." One version has it that "true liberation" la final, irrevocable, irreversible, and permanent. Another version postulates a second front for the "once liberated," and even more intricately, that "true liberation" never comes, that it is only a matter of relative standing.

    A radicalist perspective sees "liberation", not as a directional goal for the future, but as something already here now. m e "liberated" refers to those who exercise their radical understanding. Those who do not exercise their radical understanding are engaging in progressivist talk which defines "liberation" as a goal and therefore see themselves as "unliberated" or "not yet liberated."

RADICALIST
PHILOSOPHY:
ESSAYS
ON
NOTHING
AND
EVERYTHING

 

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Contents

Part 1: Overview: The Height and Breadth of Discourse

Part 2: The internalization of Discourse

    I. The Information in Symbols or Low-discourse

    II. The Argument in Titles or Mid-discourse

    III. The Synergetic Function or High-discourse

Part 3: The Externalization of Discourse.

    (A) The Affective Domain of Human Affairs or the Language of Motives

    (B) The Cognitive Domain of Human Affairs or the Language of Means

    (C) The Sensorimotor Domain of Human Affairs of the Language of Effects

Part 4: Applications of Comprehensive Discourse Analysis

              (a) Language Arts and ESL

    (i) Student-done Discourse Analysis

    (ii) Teaching Reading, Writing, and Thinking

    (iii) Teaching Literature, Philosophy, Rhetoric

    (b) Therapy, Guidance and Counseling

    (i) Chart of Dysfunctions

    (ii) Transcript Analysis

    (iii) Teaching Literature, Philosophy, Rhetoric

    (c) Self-Examination for Personal Growth

    (i) Analysis of Inner Speech

    (ii) The Development of Understanding

    (d) Applied Psycholinguistics and Socioloinguistics

    (i) Topicalization Behavior

    (ii) Speech Act Theory

    (iii) Transcript Analysis or Talk

    (iv) Content Analysis

    (v) The Format of Dictionaries

    (vi) Epistemology

    (vii) Library Science and Information Theory

    (viii) Song Analysis

    (ix) Bible Analysis

    (x) Genetic Culture and Religious Psychology

Part 1: Overview: The Height and Breadth of Discourse

       The universe of discourse has been recognized in the writings of the world's literature to possess two directions of variation. The first direction may be called the height of discourse because it is a continuum that arranges discourse according to its level of abstract; that is, its degree of removal from the concrete. What this "concreteness/abstract" continuum consists of will be discussed in a moment. The second direction of the breadth of discourse because it is a continuum that arranges discourse according to its phase of externalization from the inmost impulses of human activity to its outermost manifestation in time and space or the external act itself. In this section I present a theoretical rationale for specifying these two fundamental dimensions of the existence of discourse. This work is based on the writings of Emannuel Swedenborg (1688-1772).

 

(a) The Height of Discourse or Its Internalization

     Reality or existence is representable by discourse so that information about reality is obtainable from discourse. Concrete reality is taken to be empirical, observational, or experiential. These refer to the interaction between nature and us, what is often called phenomena (sometimes "phenomenology" or 'natural world"). This natural world has always been viewed as an ultimate manifestation or effect of some higher and prior cause. What is higher or prior to the natural, the concrete, the material, the physicalistic, is also called more abstract, more ideal, more rational, or more spiritual. Thus, when we view discourse from the properties of the reality it represents and signifies, we can arrange any discourse sample on a continuum of existential abstractness on the basis of the information recoverable from it.


     Concrete discourse encodes material information: it is representative and significative of phenomena as effects. For instance, all propositions are concrete statements about external reality or the reality of effects. An assertion may be involved (e.g., "Oh, there is the switch!"), or a denial (e.g., "No, that's not it."), or a statement of relation (e.g. "This is lighter than that"), or conditional qualification (e.g., "Call me when he arrives."), and so on. This is concrete discourse.
     Less concrete discourse can be produced when discussing or representing rational (rather than natural) facts. When, the natural, which is localized in time/space and particularized, is elevated through a process of abstraction, it changes its quality or type and becomes more removed from the particular; the rational is general while the natural is particular. General things are higher and prior to particular things; the latter are sub-instances of the former. For instance, when we assert that "This jacket is too big for me," we have produced low-discourse in the sense that it signifies information about the empirical world of concrete reality. But now if we abstract out the local and the particular, we are left with something purer and higher, as in, "This jacket makes me look like an immigrant." This discourse sample is said to be higher in level of abstraction because it discusses something that is more removed from the concrete, 'bottom' reality than what the first sentence discusses (i.e. its size or fit). We recognize that the second sentence involves community norms while the first involves sensory-observation, the latter is particular, local and concrete, the former more general and abstract.
     We can increase level of abstraction still more by discussing not what is local, concrete, and particular, nor what is general and abstracted, but rather what is universal and true in an absolute sense. This is the most abstract. Thus, we can say, for instance; that "It's foolish of me to want to buy this jacket." This discourse sample is high-discourse because it discusses the universal laws of truth and goodness; "foolishness" involves judgment according to cultural standards of what's to be considered good, true, and beautiful. The accompanying diagram pictures the continuum of discourse levels (or height).
     Note that there are three zones of abstraction. There is an obvious developmental feature to this continuum concrete discourse is acquired early in life, perhaps as early as two or three years of age. The second zone is entered around the time the child learns to read and write, while the third zone is entered in young adulthood or middle age. This growth feature is also evident in second language acquisition. Diagram 6a pictures this growth process.

5a. The Height of Discourse or Internalization

(First End) 
(Spiritual/Substantial)
  Higher 
Abstraction

Description

Examples

Level 
III
 

 

  
  
Universal/Absolute 
Laws of Order 

  

 Cultural Standards

High-discourse:

Inspired revelations 
Spiritual Parables 
Ideological Doctrines 

Poetic Metaphors 
Judgements 
Proverbs

Level 
II
  

Community Norms 

  

General/Common

Mid-discourse:

Evaluative Norms 
Characterizations 

Objective Reports 
Explanatory Argumentation

Level 
I
  

Sensory Observations 

Local/Particular

Low-discourse:

Descriptions 
Narratives 
Dialogs 
Presentations 
Instructions

  Concreteness  
(Material/Natural 
(Ultimate)

COMPREHENSIVE
DISCOURSE
ANALYSIS
CDA

(part 1)

 

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 Comprehensive Discourse Analysis  
 The Organization of Discourse  
 Organization of Discourse (cont.)  
 Ennead Matrix Tables  
 Ennead Matrix Tables (page 2)  
 Ennead Matrix (page 3)  
 Field Theory of Social Action  
 Operational Schema of the Three-fold Self  
 The Threefold Self's 9 Zones of Life  
 The Growth of the Threefold Self  
 Psychological Mind Tables  
 Comprehensive Discourse Analysis  
 Uses of Language and Speech  
 Dictionary of Graphic Concepts: Ennead Structures  
 PSY 422 Quiz: Freud Group  
 Money-Thoughts Analysis Quiz  
 Quiz Answer: Money-Thoughts Analysis  
 Huddle-Buddy Food Behavior-Change Exercise  
 Dynamic Concepts of Personality  
 PSY 222 Quiz 
 
 
 Topical Organization of Social Psychology  
 Colloquium Memorandum  
 Dictionary of Graphic Concepts: Ennead Structures (C001)  
 Dictionary of Graphic Concepts: Ennead Structures (C002)  
 Dictionary of Graphic Concepts: Ennead Structures (C003)  
 Dean Neubauer Presentation  
 Comments on the Colloquium Presentation  
 Dictionary of Graphic Concepts: Ennead Structures (C006)  
 Dictionary of Graphic Concepts: Ennead Structures (C007)  
 The Propositional Logic of Paraphastic Sets  
 Society's Witness  
 Assertion Types: Sub-Categories  
 Classification of Utterances  
 T.R. Kratochwill's Model: Treatment of Fears and Phobias  
 ESL Brownbag Talk: The Language Teacher's Threefold Self  
 11 Week Plan 

  Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 (applications)(above)

COMPREHENSIVE
DISCOURSE
ANALYSIS
CDA

(part 4)

 

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Songs Index

To all visitors, these songs are analysed by a group of passionate social psychology students of Dr. Leon James in the Spring of 1982. They were taught how to do the analyses and were given the social psychology vocabulary to use for it as it was part of their course. They reflected the soul of each student! If you would like to do what these students have done or just plainly wanted to dedicate a song to someone with your own analysis, you could just do so by simply e-mailing me with your song and your analysis of it. (Please state whom the song is dedicated to if it's a dedication, thank you!)

1. On A Clear Day | 2. The Logical Song | 3. For You I'd Chase a Rainbow | 4. Here I Am | 5. The Grand Illusion | 6. The Bond of Love | 7. Evergreen | 8. Prisoner | 9. In My Room | 10. Watching The River Run | 11.Good Times | 12.The Woman in the Moon | 13.The Games People Play | 14.Magic Power | 15.Goodbye | 16.Greatest Love of All | 17.The Stranger | 18.The Wall | 19.Da-Da |

TEACHING
STUDENTS
THE
SOCIAL
PSYCHOLOGY
OF
SONG
ANALYSIS

 

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'Discourse thinking' is a topic in educational psycholinguistics that relates to a number of traditional issues of which the following are most relevant: (a) such earlier problems in the old psycholinguistics as the relationship between speech and thought (Chomsky, 1968; Lenneberg, 1962), as well as the communication and information model of spcech (Miller, 1951; Cherry, 1957); (b) some classical issues in psychology that deal with the nature of the mental process and "imageless thought" (Boring, 1950); (c) some current literature in "verbal behavior" dealing with imagery (Paivio, 1971); and (d) much current discussion in psycho-therapy involving the use of suggestion, meditation, bio-feedback, and drugs to produce altered states of consciousness for the growth of the individual's psyche (De Ropp, 1968; Gerara, 1972; Toomin 1972; Watts, 1969; Gendlin, 1962; Tart, 1969; Leary, 1968; Masters and Houston, 1972; Lilly, 1972; Castaneda, 1971).

One possible account that integrates features of these four academic areas on the mental thought process will be briefly outlined. Some specific deficiencies of this account will then be given, following which I shall suggest some possible solutions in my elaboration of the concept of "discourse thinking."

1. Husband: Dana succeeded in putting a penny in a parking meter today without being picked up.

2. Wife: Did you take him to the record store?

3. Husband: No, to the shoe repair shop.

4. Wife: What for?

5. Husband: I got some new shoe laces for my shoes.

6. Wife: Your loafers need new heels badly.

An examination of this conversational exchange reveals a number of important organizational features of plain talk. These are as follows: (a) the verbalized utterances participants produce become understandable only if what is actually being said is related in appropriate ways to matters participants understood they were talking about but did not mention. This fact can be clearly seen in the following expanded version of the exchange provided later, by way of explanation, by one of the two participants. In connection with (1), the husband's initial utterance, the participant gave this elaborated, non- natural version:

1. Husband: This afternoon as I was bringing Dana, our four- year- old son, home from the nursery school, he succeeded in reaching high enough to put a penny in a parking meter when we parked in a meter parking zone, whereas before he has always had to be picked up to reach that high.

 

Thus, the husband's initial utterance is understandable only if a number of assumptions are made about the other matters that his utterance is related to but to which he does not directly refer: that Dana refers to their son and not to some other person by that name; that Dana has attempted in the past to feed the parking meter but never succeeded in doing so without help; that putting a penny in the meter, unassisted, is important to Dana and therefore his success in doing so today,for the first time is a noteworthy event to be reported; that the wife would be interested in knowing about it; that no other event occurred that would be more noteworthy to report at once (e.g. that no car accident took place, otherwise it would have taken precedence as an opening topic to be reported), etc.

(b) that in order to render what is being said understandable to participants, they must jointly know and agree upon the nature of the probable implications of what is being said in relation to what could have been said but wasn't- - as is shown by the expansion given for (2), the wife's utterance coming right after the husband's initial statement:

2. Wife: Since he put a penny in a meter that means that you stopped while he was with you. I know that you stopped at the record store either on the way to get him or on the way back. Was it on the way back, so that he was with you or did you stop there on the way to get him and somewhere else on the way back?

Thus, a conversational utterance, to be understandable, must not only be related to other pertinent matters not mentioned, but in addition, cer~ain inferences must be drawn which presuppose knowledge of the practical problems involved in performing social activities- - in this case, the details involving the temporal organization of picking up Dana from school and stopping at various places before bringing him home. All these details must be known to both partners, which includes the husband's knowledge of the kind of inferences the wife is making, but not overtly saying.

 

DISCOURSE
THINKING
ACCOUNTS
OR
THE
ANALYSIS
OF
MENTAL
LIFE

 

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The interpersonal saorogat technique practiced in TEC Workshops relates to the question, What is going on?, in the transactional activities of interacting participants. The type of answers that can be given to this question include, among others, such things as: A and B are engaged in a Disagreeing Transaction; A is initiating a Transactional Request; B is expressing hostility towards A; A is giving information to B; B is claiming that he is speaking objectively, while in fact, he is making a subjective inference in the impersonal register; and so on.

A parallel question can be asked about What is going on?, referring to the intrapsychic transactional activities of the domain that belongs to the third manager, in which case we are dealing with what might be called the "intrapersonal saorogat" or "self=saorogat". This is a method of analysis applied to discourse thinking, and as has been mentioned earlier, it is a derivative technique based on the analysis of conversational material and in which the "participants" are redintegrated experientially through the reification of the pronominal "I", "you" and "(s)he." It should be made clear at the outset that the analysis of discourse thinking through the intrapersonal saorogat involves public accounts given by a person about his intrapsychic transactional activities. As investigators we have. no direct observational access to the mental activity of others. This is clear. But the significance of this fact must be properly understood. Thus, it is not the case that we are studying mental activity indirectly, through overt indices such as introspective reports- - a technique traditionally employed in modern psychological investigations. This is important to note in view of the methodological difficulties inherent in thc mediational strategy of so- called objective classical behaviorism or of neo- behaviorism. There is no evidence that these inherent difficulties can be surmounted and, hence, the behavioristic or mediational study of mental processes must remain an inherently invalid enterprise. Given our purpose here, which is scientifically serious in nature, we must reject the indirect, inferential study of intrapsychic transactional activities. We must instead focus our attention on the direct study of accounts persons can produce, and in the present instance, the topic of the account is restricted to the intrapersonal transactional activities of the third manager (discourse thinking accounts).

DISCOURSE
THINKING
ACCOUNTS
OR
THE
ANALYSIS
OF
MENTAL
LIFE

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(b) Legitimization. When the listener makes it a point to let the speaker know that he understood the latter's statement and accepts it without evaluation, he is performing a legieimization transaction. For instance, in 6., Martha legitimizes John's statement in 5 that he is not aware of any feelings of anxiety. Some forms of legitimization consists in reporting to the other the successful effect of a previous intervention, as intended by the intervening participant. Thus, in 7., John reports to Martha that her clarification given in 6. has helped him see the error he committed in 5. in which he denies feeling any anxiety.

(c) Invalidation and Disagreement. An instance of disagreement or invalidation occurs in 3., where John invalidates Martha's feeling by not accepting it without evaluation ("Oh, don't be anxious."). A cottrasting validating or legitimizing comment may have been, instead, "I hear you saying you are anxious" or, "I experience you as anxious." When a saorogot group participant cannot legitimize a statement, he is expected to state this fact directly and objectively, as in 6. ("I cannot corroborate your subjective inference about my assumption."). A contrasting invalidating reaction might read, instead, "You are wrong in assuming..." or, as in 5., "Why are you assuming..." which has the same force of invalidation. I have had numerous occasions to observe that frequent subjective inferencing (as in ordinary everyday talk) leads to a relatively high rate of invalidation and disagreement, both of which are drastically reduced when the rate of objective reporting increases (as in the saorogat register). I consider this discovery important and of fundamental significance for the understanding of interpersonal transactions. The significance of this fact for improving the success of bargaining and instructional transactions does not escape me (see the next issue of BOTEC for a discussion of this).

(d)The Relief Reflex. Legieimization by the other and awareness by the self are as a rule accompanied by an intense feeling of relief , a distinct and easily perceptible decrease in tension, a physical relaxation and a 'breathing more easily.' Thus, in 6., Martha's 'clear' awareness of what is going on is followed by the relief reflex. Similarly, in 15., John's awareness of his tension deactivates it. Lack of awareness of on- going processes and invalidation by the other or disagreement has the contrasting effect of producing increased tension (as for Martha in 4., after John's invalidation in 3., and, for John, throughout the early exchange until 7.).

Continued successful practice of the self- saorogat frees the individual from 'background' tension by increasing his awareness of on- going intrapsychic transactions and provides him with an increased ability to engineer interpersonal transactions. As the ego image work becomes more and more transparent to the third manager, he is able to disentangle the etiology of behavioral manifestations in terms of - ego image, persona, or essence type. The individual comes to experience himself more fully, can achieve a perspective upon his behavior and thoughts which is more detached and independent (cf. John's use of the third person, referring to himself, in 9. in the above illustration). At the point where he can actually experience himself as a third person, seeing and knowing, without reacting or evaluating, he has reached a state of consciousness that is referred to in the relevant literature as "satori" o "liberation." For these advanced human beings, life on earth is experienced as Nirvana.

DISCOURSE
THINKING
ACCOUNTS
OR
THE
ANALYSIS
OF
MENTAL
LIFE

 

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The Social Concept of a Person

I begin with the notion of "identity" which is perhaps the most basic feature relating to the social concept of a person. An individual's name is a global label for the identity of a person. It is given at birth and ordinarily remains fixed for the rest of his social life. Naming an infant is an act of creation perpetrated by the speech community and uniquely establishes forever the social existence of a person. Around this name, there develops a structure of transactional expectations, interpersonally and intrapersonally, as the infant grows into a socially mature adult. The concepts of "personality" and "conversational identity" refer to this set of transaceional expectations such that a person's selective activities, within the possible ones defined by the transactional codc, are seen by himself and others as being "in character"- - when expectations are confirmed, or "out of character"- - when expectations are disconfirmed. Thus, within the restrictions imposed by the speech community's transactional code, persons will differ from other persons in the specific and habitual choices they regularly exhibit in their transactional activities. It is ordinarily the case that these individual choices are variously rewarded or punished by the speech community according to its peculiar systems, and these reinforcement contingencies act to influence further the individual's selectional choices in subsequent transactional activities. A person is thus a socially created entity, uniquely identified by a name, and deriving its stability through the continuity established by the habitual consistency of his transactional choices such that it more or less conforms to a perceptibly coherent set of transactional expectations, called "personality," "character" or "conversational identity."

The concept of "conversational identity" involves an elaboration of the concept of "name identity" in such a way as to extend the property of uniqueness of interpersonal intimacy. To put it another way, while a name bestows upon the person certain public legal and officious statuses (rights, privileges, responsibilities, expectations), conversational identity uniquely locates a person within a smaller and more intimate network of particularized other persons. The way in which conversational identity is established and its practical importance for interpersonal transactions are topics of great interest and importance, though I shall deal with them here only cursorily, only with enough sufficiency to show that they are indeed problems of great interest.

DISCOURSE
THINKING
ACCOUNTS
OR
THE
ANALYSIS
OF
MENTAL
LIFE

 

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Discourse Thinking A person's day- to- day behavior in a speech community can be seen to consist largely in the maintenance - activities required to protect the sets of transactional expectations governed by the predispositions of his essence type, by the practical solutions demanded of his persona, by the image building requirements of his egos, and by the reactive dynamics that results from the instability of the person's successes and failures in carring out these various tasks within the social interpersonal environment. All of this complex transactional activity needs to be supervised and coordinated. This administrative task is handled by the person's various "managers."

A manager is an intrapersonal psychic construction, an entity that is redintegrated in experience as the "I," "you" and "(s)he" of internal discourse thinking. When persons give reports, descriptions, accounts, of intrapsychic conscious activity, they ordinarily reproduce what appears to be conversational transactions (cf. "I told myself not to worry about it," "I thought , you mustn't catastrophise, Leon, buddy boy," "I saw myself doing it and thought, he is uncontrollably in rage, stop it, for God's sakes, I mustn't let myself,..." and so on); or alternately, long stretches of monologue describing events as if doing public reporting. These various pronominal intrapersonal entities are experiential redintegrations of the person's managers.

A manager's level of control or awareness corresponds to the level of consciousness at which he operates at particular times. As indicated earlier, these levels of consciousness are structured into a hierarchy of inclusion. At the lowest level, there is to be found the manager of the deep sleep state. His level of control and awareness is restricted to intra- body autonomic processes, usually called "involuntary" because it is unavailable to the control of the manager at the third level of consciousness (the ordinary waking state, see below). The manager at the second level is "in charge" of the dream state of ordinary sleep. This knowledge is partially available to the manager at the third level, the ordinary waking state usually associated with conscious, ego maintaining activities and their reactive consequences. The fourth level manager oversees the intrapsychic activities of the person associated with altered ("higher") states of consciousness.

Since I have no personal knowledge and hence, no empirical evidence of managers at the fifth and subsequent states, I shall not discuss any speculations I may have about them (but see, for example, Lilly, 1972; Castaneda, 1971; Watts, 1969; and Masters and Houston, 1972).

DISCOURSE
THINKING
ACCOUNTS
OR
THE
ANALYSIS
OF
MENTAL
LIFE

 

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The Threefold Organization of Mind and Spirit

The spiritual is the cause of the natural; therefore, the two are in correspondence.  In order to gain a better grasp of what is the spiritual, we may study the correspondence between the outer and inner worlds we live in.  We may call the outer world relative to us our horizontal community, and the internal world relative to us, our vertical community.  These two are in correspondence: the horizontal community is the effect while the vertical community is the cause.  In Swedenborg's terms, what is prior is the cause of what is posterior, which then is the effect.   Let us attempt to analytically draw the relations between our two communities in case that might give us a better and more rational comprehension of the spiritual.

The essential quality of our horizontal community is the interconnectivity that shows everywhere.  Take for instance the interconnectivity of events and people implicated in a street sign.  First there had to be a city; then people; then development of specialties such as realtors, financiers, lawyers, local government, sales outlets, workmen, and so on and so on, not to mention schools, the alphabet system invented and perfected, and so on, so that the list of people, events, and epochs that have been involved in putting up that sign, as an ordinary street sign we recognize, is a vast number.  This is an illustration of interconnectivity, which is an essential quality of community life.  The word "community" is listed in the dictionary with two roots; one is “co-" meaning "together with" and the other, "-muni" meaning "striving."  Hence community is a striving together, which thus is manifested in the quality of interconnectivity.

We know from revealed principles in the Third Testament that the spiritual world we live in is characterized by a most orderly appearance of geography, government, and justice; from this true of faith we may see that the intercon-nectivity of the horizontal community we live in is an effect which is caused by the interconnectivity that characterizes the spiritual world in which we also live.  There is thus a correspondence or, harmonious order, between our outer world and our inner world. By studying what the Word teaches about our vertical community we are enabled to see the outer world from the perspective of the inner world.  This is indeed a desirable perspective because coming from the Word it gives only trues to behold.  Thus, our external world is then seen by us in a true perspective.

The
Horizontal
and
Vertical
Communities
of our
Dual
Citizenship

 

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Ordinary and Special Consensus | Empirical Metaphysics | The Metaphysics of Nothingness | Non-empirical Accounts | The Conceptual Order in Physics and Empirical Metaphysics | The Metaphysics of Physics

For an account to be empirical, it must specify a particular operative procedure for the routine verification of the statements that belong to it. In physics, this is accomplished by the attainment of a special consensus about facts that derive from ordinary consensus. Ultimately the completion by an individual of the steps specified by the operative procedure of the scientific, experimental method is ipso facto an instance of the requisite routine social validation which characterizes physics and its empiricism. I want to show that it is possible to give a metaphysical account of reality that will be such that it will specify a particular operative procedure for its verifiability as routine social validation, viz. that it will be an empirical account. I shall do this in the next section by prep- sensing an account, to be referred to as "The Metaphysics of Nothingness", and this account will be seen to be empirical in nature. At the moment, I would like to give a more general characterization of accounts about reality that belong to an empirical metaphysics.

Criterion 1:

The account must include an existential definition of "people" (Man, I, person, etc.). This requirement is equivalent to the necessity of the statement "There is a Universe" in physics. The function of criterion 1 will be properly understood if it is seen that

Universe : Physics = People : Empirical Metaphysics

This existential criterion is fundamental to an account of reality not only in the sense that it establishes the object of inquiry in the account, but also in that it justifies the existence of the account itself, which otherwise would remain problematic.    

In different terms, the existential criterion has the result of excluding "Why-Questions" about the universe, man, life, etc. that purport to such things as "the ultimate purpose" and the like. The accounts in physics need not, and cannot, concern themselves with the purpose of the Universe, or the reasons for its particular properties, as they are, as opposed to what they might be. The accounts in empirical metaphysics need not, and cannot, concern themselves with people as they might be, or the reasons they are as they are (such as "in the image of" or "by the Grace of" God, the latter being an entity not describable within the account).

In still different terms, the existential criterion will insure that the account establishes a 'materialistic monism' (I prefer the term 'existential monism'). It thus specifically excludes dualistic doctrines that lead to distinctions such as mind-body, matter-spirit, Man-God, and the like.     Finally, the existential criterion serves to establish the distinction between "Making up facts" (i.e. mythical events, pseudo-facts) and "discovering facts". 6 Thus, it is not merely the case that "I think. Therefore I am", but nontrivially, "I am what I am because I am that way."

EMPIRICAL
METAPHYSICS
AND
PHYSICS:
COMMON
CONCEPTUAL
FOUNDATIONS

 

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Contributions to a Radicalist Philosophy of the Human Condition

1. Definitional assertions.

To hurry is to walk fast.

To eat is to ingest food.

To tie is to lose life.

To succeed is to attain one's goal.

To return is to come back.

To make something is to to something.

2. Categorizing assertions

I am an American.

He is an impostor.

She is a wife.

Honolulu is a city.

This is a sentence.

His name is John.

3. Descriptive assertions.

An elephant is larger than an ant.

She is pregnant.

He is prejudiced.

The straight path is narrow.

God is dead.

The world is redeemable.

Buddha is the One.

4. Radicalist assertions.

To solve a problem is to create one.

To make something is to undo something.

Perfect control is perfect spontaneity.

Fulfillment is the perception of yesterday's wants.

To agree with something is to disagree with something.

To return is never to have left.

To rebel against the system is to be in perfect command of it.

To fall is to elevate the ground.

To arrive is to have gotten nowhere.

To die is to be reborn.

The meek are the strong.

To lose is to win.

The many are one.

5, Objectifying assertions.

To be on both sides is to have all.

I am afraid.

We are together.

I am God.

To be a clown is to trite what one exposes.

To hear is to legitimize.

To love is to empower.

6. Subjectifying assertions.

Your craving for food is a symptom of anxiety.

! Prejudice is undesirable.

I You are afraid.

You are alone.

The dog is unwilling to come.

You are rejecting your parents.

7. Vacuous assertions.

Rain is water falling from the sky.

Life is a Journey.

I am what I am

To live is not to die.

A rose is a rose, is a rose.

To walk is not to run.

The president is the supreme commander.

8. Nonsensical assertions.

Life is death.

To lose is not to lose.

The meek are not the meek.

I am what I am not.

The pregnant woman is not pregnant.

The devil is the saint.

    We have presented these illustrations with the hope that the reader will gain an intuitive understanding of the classification system used here. Now we shall present a more explicit account of the intended distinctions being set up here.

    Definitional assertions are evaluated by internal considerations. They are either proper or improper; the latter occurs when the internal logic of the reference system is violated or contradicted. The content of the reference system is established through authoritative pronouncement.

    Categorizing assertions are evaluated by external considerations. They are either adequate in their empirical Justification or inadequate. Adequacy is adjudicated on the basis of agrees upon operational steps (e.g. that I am an American can be adequately validated by exhibiting a passport).

    Descriptive assertions are evaluated through consensual corroboration. They are either corroborated, disconfirmed, or uncorroborated. Corroboration or disconfirmation require consensus on procedural matters

    Radicalist assertions teal with the essence of the origin, which is to say that they concern themselves exclusively with linking opposites in a positive assertion. They are evaluated by the process of radical understanding (this is to be elaborated below). Radicalist assertions are either comprehensible or incomprehensible.

    Objectifying assertions are evaluated through direct observational validation based on experimental, objective, radical observation. They are either authentic or inauthentic. Inauthentic objectifying assertions are contrary to face.

    Subjectifying assertions are based on processes of inferential reasoning. They are evaluated in terms of a pre-defined system of logic or Justification. m They may be true or false.

    Vacuous assertions expose redundant relationships. They are either correct or incorrect. They are evaluated through an internal analysis of the linked components, an analysis which depends on encyclopedic knowledge for its verifiability.

    Nonsensical assertions produce logical contradictions and are apprehended directly in the case of elementary assertions. They are either sensible or not-sensible.

    The following table summarizes the mayor relevant features of the eight assertion types.

Type of assertion Characteristic evaluation Basis of evaluation
1. Definitional proper - improper authoritative - pronouncement
2. Categorizing adequate - inadequate operational Justification
3. Descriptive corroborated - disconfirmed-uncorroborated consensual validation
4. Radicalist comprehensible - incomprehensible radical understanding
5. Objectifying authentic - inauthentic radical observation
6. Subjectifying true - false inferential reasoning
7. Vacuous correct - incorrect encyclopedic knowledge
8. Nonsensical sensible - not sensible elementary logic

    I caution the reader, once again not to take the illustrations as defining the nature of an assertion. Instead, ...

ESSAYS
ON
NOTHING
AND
EVERYTHING

 

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The sequence affective--->cognitive--->sensorimotor is found everywhere in Swedenborg's writings, as in the following samples:

AFFECTIVE---->COGNITIVE----->SENSORIMOTOR
Love Wisdom Use
Good Truth Appearance
Will Understanding Action
Intention Plan Execution
Source Cause Effect
Desire Belief Conduct
Spiritual Intellectual Sensual
Feeling Thinking Sensing

Swedenborg was always meticulous in respecting the primacy of the affective. In the paragraph quoted above (DLW 384), the following stands out:

Moreover, the brain itself is divided into two hemispheres, the heart into two ventricles, and the lungs into two lobes; the right of all these having relation to the good of truth, and the left to the truth of good, or, what is the same, the right having relation to the good of love from which is the truth of wisdom, and the left having relation to the truth of wisdom which is from the good of love.

Note his care with the expressions "the good of truth" and "the truth of good." First, he specifies that "the good of truth" (right brain) is the same as "the good of love from which is the truth of wisdom." Translating, we have "the affective of the cognitive" = "the affective from which is the cognitive." It is thus explicitly stated that the cognitive is from the affective. The affective is primary. Second, it is specified that "the truth of good" (left brain) is the same as "the truth of wisdom which is from the good of love." Once again the directionality is strictly maintained: the cognitive (truth or wisdom) is from the affective (good or love).    There are many more such passages, as discussed in this entry.

Genetic Culture

The unconscious connections between the affective states and their sensorimotor instantiations are established by two human growth mechanisms where the cognitive is as-if bypassed, and feelings or emotions trigger sensations and acts that remain unconscious to the individual, but is visible to others.    One is the formation of basic personality habits, moods, and temperaments in childhood prior to the talking phase or not much further beyond (up to age 4 on the average).  The other is from automaticity of habits that were conscious in their formation and early use, but sunk into the unconscious due to cessation of conscious monitoring.  Examples are:

  • the gate or manner of walking
  • the facial expressions that accompany conversation
  • the characteristic manner of reacting to some things that others can witness
  • the way we drive (aggressive, competitive, supportive)
  • our ethnic traits (religion, eating, lifestyle, political ideology, discourse patterns)

As individuals mature over the decades, a series of sensorimotor instantiations are triggered in relation to sequence and biographical teleology or spiritual fate known to God who directs the progression in its least details.    without this divine intelligent and purposive management, the teleology would be impossible and the entire scheme would be sytematically downgraded by the second universal law of thermodynamics (chaos).  But the opposite actually takes place:   less chaos, more order towards an ideal goal or end.  This end has been revealed to us by God--see my article on dualism in science.

This process of unconscious, sequenced, and ethnic sensorimotor instantiations can be called GENETIC CULTURE.  Objective methods of investigating genetic culture include:

self-witnessing methods involving

community-classroom methods involving

methods of community cataloguing practices involving

See also this statement:

Effects of Mere Exposure:  a Comment on Zajonc's Attitudinal Enhancement Hypothesis

 

GENETIC
CULTURE:
THE
PRIMACY
OF THE
AFFECTIVE
OVER THE
COGNITIVE

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