Generation 19     Fall 2003   University of Hawaii    Dr. Leon James, Instructor

Psych 409a, Psych 409b, Psych 459

Required Tasks and Their Due Dates

 

TASK

WHAT IS IT

DUE DATES

Friday midnight

1

Registering on the Web as a Lab User and send email to the instructor

Sept. 5

2

Posting your first week’s Web discussion messages

Sept. 12

3

 Exploring the Generational Curriculum

Sept. 26

4

Uploading your Home Page and Report 1: My Coping With New Information Behaviors

Oct. 17

5

Uploading Report 2: My Weekly Research

Nov. 7

6

Uploading Report 3: Strengthening My Oral Presentation Skills

Dec. 5

optional

Sending email to instructor for re-grading

Dec. 12

 

Task 1:  Registering and Sending Email to the Instructor

Important:  Follow these steps in the exact order shown. For writing your Report 1 (see below),  you have to keep empirical data or notes as you go along. Be sure to read the instructions for Report 1 in order to know what kind of notes you need to keep when doing the following tasks:

1)   Fill out Pre-ratings before you start this task. This can be done in class.

2)  Go to the Web and register as a Lab User for this class.

3)   Send email to the instructor. To be valid, it must be as follows:

 

Subject Line:  my email address

Message:

______________________

Your first and last name in that order (no middle name)

Your course (either 409a, 409b, or 459)

Your email in this format exactly:   Leon James leon@hawaii.edu

Your Pseudonym (if you're planning to use one for your published Reports)

______________________

Nothing else (delete all other lines or comments).

The instructor will email back with an OK and a reminder to fill out the post-ratings at this time. Then the task is successfully completed. Do not fill out the Post-ratings until you’ve received the OK message from the instructor. Keep your notes and the Pre- and Post-ratings for your Report 1.

 

Task 2:  Posting Your First Week’s Web Discussion Messages

Important:  Follow these steps in the exact order shown. For your report to be valid, you must keep empirical data or notes as you go along.

1)   Fill out your Pre-ratings before you start this task. This can be done in class.

2)   Register at WebCT and post your two messages.

3)   Fill out your Post-ratings after you exit WebCT and have posted your two required messages. Keep your notes and Pre- and Post-ratings for your Report 1.

 

Task 3:  Exploring the Generational Curriculum

Important:  Follow these steps in the exact order shown. For your report to be valid, you must keep empirical data or notes as you go along.

1)   Fill out your Pre-ratings before you start this task. This can be done in class.

2)   Schedule yourself for a Web session of at least 30 minutes and start exploring the Generational Curriculum. More than 30 minutes is recommended so that you can look at all prior 18 generations and be able to read some of the many interesting student reports. So you might want to schedule yourself for several sessions for the week. Be sure to keep notes for each session: date, what you saw, how you reacted. It's a good idea to type all your notes in one file so you have them ready when you write this Report.

3)   Fill out your Post-ratings after your last exploration session ends. Keep all your notes and Pre- and Post-ratings for your Report 1.

 

Task 4:  Publishing your Home Page and Report 1

Important:  Follow these steps in the exact order shown. For your report to be valid, you must keep empirical data or notes as you go along.

1)   Fill out your Pre-ratings before you start this task. This can be done in class.

2)   Create your Home Page and upload it to your class folder.

3)   Go the Web and check your Home Page. Edit as needed and upload the new version. Do this until you are satisfied.

4)   Create your Report 1 and upload it.

5)   Go the Web and check your Report 1 (make sure all links work!).

6)  Check your link on your Home Page that goes to your Report 1—does it work? If not, correct the problem.

7)   After all problems are solved and everything works fine (not before), fill out your Post-ratings.

8)   Edit your Report 1 as needed to include the Post-ratings and notes. Without this your Report 1 is not complete. Upload the final version of your Report 1.

9)  Email the instructor that your Report 1 is published. Subject Line: Report 1 published. Message: anything you like to say.

 

Task 5:  Publishing your Report 2

Important:  Follow these steps in the exact order shown. For your report to be valid, you must keep empirical data or notes as you go along.

1)   Fill out your Pre-ratings before you start this task. This can be done in class.

2)   Create your Report 2 and upload it to your class folder.

3)   Go the Web and check your Report 2 (make sure all links work from your Home Page to your Report 2 and vice versa).

4)   Fill out your Post-ratings after viewing your Report 2 on the Web.

5)   Edit your Report 2 as needed and upload the corrected file (it will replace the old one).

6)  Email the instructor that your Report 2 is published. Subject Line: Report 2 published. Message: anything you like to say.

 

Task 6:  Publishing your Report 3

Important:  Follow these steps in the exact order shown. For your report to be valid, you must keep empirical data or notes as you go along.

1)   Fill out your Pre-ratings before you start this task. This can be done in class.

2)   Create your Report 3 and upload it to your class folder.

3)   Go the Web and check your Report 3 (make sure all links work from your Home Page to your Report 3 and vice versa).

4)   Fill out your Post-ratings after viewing your Report 3 on the Web.

5)   Upload your Post-ratings and edit your Report 3 as needed.

6)  Email the instructor that your Report 3 is published. Subject Line: Report 2 published. Message: anything you like to say.

 

Instructions for the three Reports

Report 1:  Email, WebCT, and the Generational Curriculum

 

Note:  When you publish your Home Page and Reports to the Web you can use your real name as most students have done in the past, or you can use a Pseudonym, as some students have done in the past, as long as you register your Pseudonym with the Instructor when you do Task 1 -- see above for details).

 

(1)  For the Pre-ratings, use Form 1. The instructor will bring Form 1 to class each time one of the 6 Tasks is being explained for the first time. You keep all the Forms since you have to type them out to include as part of your Reports.

 

(2)  For the Post-ratings, use Form 2. You can do this in your word processor. Just copy Form 2 on the Web (all needed links are on your G19 Class Home Page at:  www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/leonj/leonpsy19/g19classhome.html

 

Paste Form 2 into your word processor, fill it out, and save it for later. This way it will be ready for your Report.

 

(3)  How to keep track of details: Email, WebCT, and the Generational Curriculum

 

First, you register on the Web as Lab User. Second, you email your address to the instructor. Third, you register for WebCT and post your first week’s two messages. Fourth, you schedule yourself for several sessions to explore the Generational Curriculum. Fifth, you create your Home Page. Sixth, you write your Report 1. Seventh, you upload both (Home Page and Report 1). Eighth, you check it with your browser, edit as necessary with your word processor, and upload again. Ninth, you email the instructor that your Report 1 is published.

 

You can keep hand written notes while you are completing this task. You also have access to a word processor or notepad while you’re searching the Web or trying to complete this task like emailing or uploading a file, or trying to fix a link in your Report, or have the images show in your report after uploading (these are all common problems that prior generations had).

 

When you write or type your notes, be sure you mark the date and what you were trying to accomplish.

 

Make lists of the errors you make (what you forgot or neglected to do or wrongly assumed, etc.). For each error, enter what you think is the reason for the error – are you the cause of it or is it also the system’s fault?

 

Make notes of your feelings and orientation while trying to complete this task. How did you cope with frustration and uncertainty? What kind of help did you seek or receive? What kind of developmental stages did you go through from beginning to end? How did success feel like? In what way was the learning experience worthwhile (or not)?

 

These data notes are most valid when you make the notes while you are performing the sub-steps of each Task (rather than trying to reconstruct the details later from memory).

 

(4) How to organize and analyze your data and notes:

 

A)  Analyze the many separate steps it took to complete each of the tasks involved. Include steps involving asking people for help, looking up help instructions, trial and error attempts, etc. In order to be objective and valid, you must base your analysis on notes you took while completing the six tasks.  Your purpose is to document empirically what are the characteristics of your information behaviors—

·        my affective information behaviors (feelings, emotions, intentions, and reactions, etc.)

·        my cognitive information behaviors (thoughts, thinking sequences, strategies, plans, interpretations, etc.)

     

      The more detail you can capture, the more objective and valid your report will be. Please be sure to keep detailed notes as you carry out each task! Things to write down for each task:

·        what sub-tasks were involved (this is hard to reconstruct later since there are so many) AND how you tried to keep track of them

·        what you tried that didn’t work AND how you felt while it was happening

·        what errors you made AND how you felt as a result. How did you cope.

·        other details that show your empirical observations about your information behaviors AND how you react to them affectively or emotionally—positive or negative. How did it affect your self-confidence and your motivation to continue looking for the answer?

 

B)  Errors are a normal part of all tasks and people. Analyze the types of errors you made in carrying out each task. List and briefly describe each error and its type. How did you solve them? Why did you make these errors—what is your hypothesis about it (was it due to you or to the computer system)? How did you feel regarding the errors? How did you cope with challenging situations? Describe the details—affective and cognitive information behaviors.

 

C) While exploring the Generational Curriculum, keep notes about what student Home Pages you looked at and what your experience was regarding the appearance of their site and the content of their reports. What differences did you notice as you explored the early generations and the later generations?  What is your overall evaluation of this approach to learning information literacy for psychology majors? How do you experience being generation "19"? How do you see the future of the Generational Curriculum? What suggestions or advice can you give to the instructor and future students who will be reading your reports?

 

D)  Describe and discuss your experience of having to face a due date for completing each sub-task. Did you experience anxiety or distress at any point? How did you manage to cope? What were your strategies for coping with uncertainty and frustration? Were you optimistic or pessimistic—explain.

 

E)  Put the Pre- and Post-ratings into a Table. Discuss how this type of self-observation data can help you and others to study information behavior and computer systems.

 

F)  What are your conclusions from this exercise regarding your information behavior and regarding computer systems? How do you see yourself in relation to computer systems a few years down the line?

 

G) Later, in order to improve your report, compare your data with the data of some other students in G19 by going to their reports on the Web (links are on G19 Class Home Page). Edit your Report by adding these comparisons. Upload the edited Report and it will replace the older version.

  

Report 2:  My Weekly Research

 

Note:  When you publish your Home Page and Reports to the Web you can use your real name as most students have done in the past, or you can use a Pseudonym registered with the Instructor (see Task 1 above for details).

 

(1)  For the Pre-ratings, use Form 1. The instructor will bring Form 1 to class each time the Task is being explained for the first time. You keep all the Forms since you have to type them out to include as part of your Reports.

 

(2)  For the Post-ratings, use Form 2. You can do this in your word processor. Just copy Form 2 on the Web. All needed links to instructions and forms are on your G19 Class Home Page at:   www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/leonj/leonpsy19/g19classhome.html

 

Paste Form 2 into your word processor, fill it out, and save it for later. This way it will be ready for your Report.

 

(3)  How to keep track of details:

 

You can keep hand written notes while you are completing this task. You also have access to a word processor  while you’re searching the Web each week for your WebCT forum discussions.

 

When you write or type your notes, be sure you mark the date and what you were trying to accomplish.

 

Make lists of the errors you make (what you forgot or neglected to do or wrongly assumed, etc.). For each error, enter what you think is the reason for the error – are you the cause of it or is it also the system’s fault?

 

Make notes of your feelings and orientation while trying to complete this task. How did you cope with frustration and uncertainty? What kind of help did you seek or get? What kind of developmental stages did you go through from beginning to end? How did success feel like? In what way was the learning experience worthwhile (or not)?

 

These data notes are most valid when you make the notes while you are performing the sub-steps of each Task (rather than trying to reconstruct the details later from memory).

 

(4) How to organize and analyze your data and notes:

 

A)  Analyze the many separate steps it took to complete each of the sub-tasks involved. Include steps involving asking people for help, looking up help instructions, trial and error attempts, etc. In order to be objective and valid, you must base your analysis on notes you took while completing the sub-tasks.  Your purpose is to document empirically what are the characteristics of your information behaviors—

·        my affective information behaviors (feelings, emotions, intentions, and reactions, etc.)

·        my cognitive information behaviors (thoughts, thinking sequences, strategies, plans, interpretations, etc.)

     

      The more detail you can capture, the more objective and valid your report will be. Please be sure to keep detailed notes as you carry out each sub-task! Things to write down for each task:

·        what sub-tasks were involved (this is hard to reconstruct later since there are so many) AND how you tried to keep track of them

·        what you tried that didn’t work AND how you felt while it was happening

·        what errors you made AND how you felt as a result. How did you cope.

·        other details that show your empirical observations about your information behaviors AND how you react to them affectively or emotionally—positive or negative. How did it affect your self-confidence and your motivation to continue looking for the answer?

 

B)  Errors are a normal part of all tasks and people. Analyze the types of errors you made in carrying out each task. List and briefly describe each error and its type. How did you solve them? Why did you make these errors—what is your hypothesis about it (was it due to you or to the computer system)? How did you feel regarding the errors? How did you cope with challenging situations? Describe the details—affective and cognitive information behaviors.

 

C)  Describe and discuss your experience of having to face a due date for completing each task. Did you experience anxiety or distress at any point? How did you manage to cope? What were your strategies for coping with uncertainty and frustration? Were you optimistic or pessimistic—explain.

 

D)  Put the Pre- and Post-ratings into a Table. Discuss how this type of self-observation data can help you and others to study information behavior and computer systems.

 

E)  What are your conclusions from this exercise regarding your information behavior and regarding computer systems? How do you see yourself in relation to computer systems a few years down the line?

 

F)  Later, in order to improve your report, compare your data with the data of some other students in G19 by going to their reports on the Web (links are on G19 Class Home Page). Edit your discussion of the data by adding it to your Report. Upload the edited Report and it will replace the older version.

  

Report 3:  Strengthening My Oral Presentation Skills

 

Note:  When you publish your Home Page and Reports to the Web you can use your real name as most students have done in the past, or you can use a Pseudonym registered with the Instructor (see Task 1 above for details).

 

(1)  For the Pre-ratings, use Form 1. The instructor will bring Form 1 to class each time the Task is being explained for the first time. You keep all the Forms since you have to type them out to include as part of your Reports.

 

(2)  For the Post-ratings, use Form 2. You can do this in your word processor. Just copy Form 2 on the Web (all needed links are on your G19 Class Home Page at:  www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/leonj/leonpsy19/g19classhome.html

 

Paste Form 2 into your word processor, fill it out, and save it for later. This way it will be ready for your Report.

 

(3)  How to keep track of details: Preparing for my oral presentation

 

You will be making two oral presentation based on the book chapters you are assigned for a particular date. You are given the two dates in class and you fill out the Pre-ratings at that time. After your first presentation you will receive an email message from the instructor giving your grade and some suggestions for improvements. You might also receive email messages from other students in class. Then you prepare for your second oral presentation by practicing in advance. Then you get email from the instructor with your grade for the second presentation. Then you fill out the Post-ratings and complete Report 3, upload it, and email the instructor that your Report 3 is published.

 

You need to keep notes while you are completing this Task. How often do you think about the oral presentation and what kind of emotions are involved? (anxiety, anticipation, uncertainty, avoidance, etc.)  Make lists of the errors you make (what you forgot or neglected to do or wrongly assumed, etc.). For each error, enter what you think is the reason for the error – are you the cause of it or is it also the social environment and what's going on around you?

 

Make notes of your feelings and orientation while trying to complete this task. How did you cope with frustration and uncertainty? What kind of developmental stages did you go through from beginning to end? (e.g., practice sessions on your own or with a friend) What kind of help did you seek or receive from others? How did success feel like after the presentation? What kind of email did you get from other students? In what way was the learning experience worthwhile (or not)?

 

These data notes are most valid when you make the notes while you are performing the sub-steps of each Task (rather than trying to reconstruct the details later from memory). Be sure to keep similar data and notes for both of your oral presentations so you can contrast them empirically (how you actually felt and what you actually thought and did).

 

(4) How to organize and analyze your data and notes:

 

A)  Analyze the many separate steps it took to complete each of the sub-tasks involved. Include steps involving asking people for help, looking up help instructions, trial and error attempts, etc. In order to be objective and valid, you must base your analysis on notes you took while completing the six tasks. 

Your purpose is to document empirically what are the characteristics of your information behaviors in connection with your oral presentation

·        my affective information behaviors (feelings, emotions, intentions, reactions, etc., while getting ready for your oral presentation)

·        my cognitive information behaviors (thoughts, thinking sequences, strategies, plans, interpretations, etc.)

     

      The more detail you can capture, the more objective and valid your report will be. Please be sure to keep detailed notes as you carry out each task! Things to write down for each task:

·        what sub-tasks were involved (this is hard to reconstruct later since there are so many) AND how you tried to keep track of them

·        what you tried that didn’t work AND how you felt while it was happening

·        what errors you made AND how you felt as a result. How did you cope.

·        other details that show your empirical observations about your information behaviors AND how you react to them affectively or emotionally—positive or negative. How did it affect your self-confidence and your motivation to continue looking for the answer?

 

B)  Errors are a normal part of all tasks and people. Analyze the types of errors you made in carrying out each task. List and briefly describe each error and its type. How did you solve them? Why did you make these errors—what is your hypothesis about it (was it due to you or to the computer system)? How did you feel regarding the errors? How did you cope with challenging situations? Describe the details—affective and cognitive information behaviors.

 

C)  Describe and discuss your experience of having to face a due date for completing each task. Did you experience anxiety or distress at any point? How did you manage to cope? What were your strategies for coping with uncertainty and frustration? Were you optimistic or pessimistic—explain.

 

D)  Put the Pre- and Post-ratings into a Table. Discuss how this type of self-observation data can help you and others to study information behavior and computer systems.

 

 E)  What are your conclusions from this exercise regarding your information behavior and regarding computer systems? How do you see yourself in relation to computer systems a few years down the line?

 

F)  Later, in order to improve your report, compare your data with the data of some other students in G19 by going to their reports on the Web (links are on G19 Class Home Page). Edit your discussion of the data by adding it to your Report. Upload the edited Report and it will replace the older version.

 

Weekly WebCT Discussion Topics and Rules

 

(1) To get your full points you need to participate in at least 5 of the 10 topics, about equally over the entire semester. More participation is encouraged but optional.

(1) The WebCT Forum Discussions are at this address:   webct.hawaii.edu

Create your account by following instructions for self-registration. After registering, it will ask you to add the course. Select "Psych409a/Psy409b/Psy459" from the list of courses shown. Once you've successfully added the course, select "Discussions" and you will see the 10 topics and be able to post to any of them.

(2) You need to post 2 messages each week starting the week of September 8. To get your full points you need to post every week and only on the 10 topics specified. If you miss posting a week, you must make it up immediately the week after by posting double. The last week for posting will be the week of December 1. There are thus 13 weeks of posting or 26 valid messages to be posted by each student. More postings are encouraged but optional. WebCT keeps statistics for the instructor on  the number and date of all your postings and logon sessions.

(3) One message you post each week is a comment message in which you give a reaction comment to a research topic message posted by other students from any of the three classes. Please specify on the Subject line who it is that you are answering.

(4) The other message you post each week is a research message in which you report briefly the research you did that week for one of the 10 approved topics. In order for your research message to be valid you must mention these six things in each research message:

(a) What specific aspect of the research topic you were searching for (refer to the lettered sub-topics listed below)

(b)  Which search terms or phrases you used (students often forget this so be sure to keep adequate notes for each search session you do!)

(c) The search engine or other way you found the information (this way other people can repeat your search)

(d) Any problems or other details about the searching (this can be helpful in a general way)

(e) The Web address of the site or file (precede the address with "http://" so that WebCT can make it into a live link when you post your message)

(f) One or two things about what you found (be brief since others can go check the original if they want to)

Clearly, in order to post your weekly research message, you FIRST need to spend a few minutes doing some searching on the Web or some library facility on the Web. This way you'll be able to have something specific to report in your research message for that week. Also, you need to look at the lettered sub-topics (below) before each search session. This will give you direction for your search and will allow you to post a valid research message every week.

Important Reminder:  Keep notes of your weekly search sessions and activities (see instructions above for Report 2: My Weekly Research).

 

The 10 approved topics and their specifications:

 

(1)  How optimism affects problem solving

(2)  Information literacy issues

(3)  How self-confidence affects performance

(4)  Gender discrimination in language use

(5)  Speed limits and drivers

(6)  Multitasking while driving

(7)  How people cope with noise in their lives

(8)  Understanding the difference between rational vs. mystical spirituality

(9)  Errors—when, where, and what types

(10) La Femme Nikita Fan Movement

 

Each lettered item below represents a different specific focus you can research. When you are searching the Web or the library databases and journals, try to find something that is specifically relevant to one of the lettered sub-topics listed below. Then you can go to the WebCT discussions and post your research message of the week with the results of what you were able to find. It's very important that your research message be very specific regarding these sub-topics. Avoid general information that does not deal with the details listed here.

 

(1)  How optimism affects problem solving

 

a)  What is optimism? What forms does it take? How widespread is it?

 

b)  What is its history? Is it increasing over time? What are the forces that keep it going?

 

c)  Why does optimism exist? What do people get out of it?

 

d)  What do the experts say about optimism? What are their theories and explanations?

 

e)  Should optimism be taught in school? Where do you yourself stand on this trait? When do you tend to be optimistic, when not? What influenced you to be this way?

 

 

(2)  Information literacy issues

 

a)  What is information literacy? What forms does it take? How widespread is it?

 

b)  What information literacy “issues” (or concerns) are you experiencing this semester? How is it related to what you read about in the Generational Curriculum?

 

c)  What is the history of information literacy? Is it increasing over time? What are the forces that keep it going?

 

d)  Why does information literacy exist?  Why is it needed? What do people get out of it?

 

e)  What do the experts say about “information literacy” or about “information behavior”? What are their theories and explanations?

 

f)  What should be done about information literacy? What could be done about it? How will you be involved? How do people you know (family, friends, coworkers) relate to information literacy?

 

 

(3)  How self-confidence affects performance

 

a)  Does self-confidence influence how we perform tasks? What kind of evidence is there for this? What other names or expressions do people use to discuss this topic? (e.g., self-efficacy, self-evaluation, self-concept, etc.)

 

b)  What is the history of this topic in the literature? How is this topic being discussed and by whom? What is its interest value?

 

c)  What do the experts say about how self-confidence affects task performance? What are their theories and explanations?

 

d)  What should be done about it? Should self-confidence be taught in school?

 

e)  How do you relate yourself to this topic? Is this a prominent issue in your mind?

 

 

(4)  Gender discrimination in language use

 

a)  What is gender discrimination in language use? What forms does it take (e.g., sexist jokes, gender coded expressions, talking style of men vs. women, etc.)? How widespread is gender discrimination in language use?

 

b)  What is the history of gender discrimination in language use? Is it increasing over time? What are the forces that keep it going?

 

c)  Why does gender discrimination in language use exist? What do people get out of it?

 

d)  What do the experts say about gender discrimination in language use? (e.g., linguistics, psychology, marketing, advertising, media, pop culture, women’s groups, etc.) What are their theories and explanations?

 

e)  What should be done about it? What could be done about it? How does your own language use reflect gender discrimination? What about the language use of your family, friends, and coworkers?

 

 

(5)  Speed limits and drivers

 

a)  Is there an individual resistance and/or organized national rebellion against speed limits? What forms does it take? (e.g., political action groups, Web sites, individual decision or habit to ignore posted speed limits, etc.)  How widespread is it?

 

b)  What is the history of speed limits? How did they come into existence? Why do speed limits exist? What does society get out of it?

 

c)  What do the experts say about it? What are their theories and explanations about why speed limits are needed and why people ignore them?

 

d)  What should be done about speed limits and drivers’ opposition to them? What could be done about it? As a driver and pedestrian, what is your relationship to this topic and to speed limits?

 

e)  Is there a moral issue regarding speed limits? Does the habit of ignoring speed limits have spiritual implications or consequences?

 

 

(6)  Multitasking while driving

 

a)  What is multitasking while driving? What forms does it take? How widespread is it? Have you observed it yourself? Have you done it yourself? Is it a topic among your friends and coworkers?

 

b)  What is its history? Is it increasing over time? What are the forces that keep it going?

 

c)  Why do people multitask while driving? What do they get out of it? What about you and the people you drive with?

 

d)  What do the experts say about it? What are their theories and explanations? Is there disagreement among them? How much is known about this? What kind of research is being done? Is this research valid? (e.g., done with simulators vs. real driving)

 

e)  What should be done about multitasking while driving? What could be done about it? What is your opinion at this point?

 

 

(7)  How people cope with noise in their lives

 

a)  What forms does this problem take? (e.g., excessive noise from roommates, neighbors, airplanes, traffic, “no talking” areas like libraries or classrooms, closed spaces like restaurants or buses, etc.).

 

b)  How widespread is the problem and the complaints? How do people complain and what do they say? What state of mind does it arouse in them (e.g., rage, annoyance, compassion, etc.)? What do people do about it? (e.g., negotiation, threats, retaliation, coping, acceptance, fights, murder, discrimination, noise shields, etc.). How does it affect health and quality of life?

 

c)  What is the history of noise? Is it increasing over time? What are the forces that keep it going? How is it being contained (e.g., legislation, education, engineering and technology, etc.)?

 

d)  Is “making noise” a moral and spiritual issue? Should we take responsibility for the noise we make? (e.g., radio while driving, TV at home, yelling and playing in one’s back yard, partying in one’s apartment, vacuuming late at night, driving a loud motorcycle, having dogs that bark, etc.)

 

e)  How could we educate or train people regarding noise as a social problem (e.g., legal or social incentives and rewards, spiritual focus, etc.). Are you a contributor to noise? Are you a victim of noise?

 

f)  What do the experts say about noise pollution—its origin and containment? What are their theories and explanations?

 

 

(8)  Understanding the difference between rational vs. mystical spirituality

 

a)  What is “rational spirituality”? How does it differ from “mystical” spirituality? What forms of spirituality or religion fall into the “rational” category vs. the “mystical” or “sensuous” category? (e.g., fate vs. chance vs. God as the locus of control for events).

 

b)  Can praying be considered rational behavior? What approaches are there to God? (e.g., reformation and regeneration of character or “being good” vs. meditation and special practices)

 

c)  What is the history of rational and mystical spirituality? Have they changed over time? What are the forces that influence its course?

 

d)  Why does spirituality exist in these two forms—rational vs. mystical (or “experiential”)? What do people get out of each type of spirituality?

 

e)  What do the experts say about the difference between rational spirituality and other forms of spirituality? What are their theories and explanations?

 

f)  What is your position on these two types of spirituality? How do you understand their difference? In what way is this a relevant issue to your own life?

 

 

(9)  Errors—when, where, and what types

 

a)  What are “errors” (or mistakes) people make? What forms do they take and where? (e.g., workplace, home, operating some equipment or appliance, forgetting appointments, mistaking someone for someone else, losing things, breaking things, misusing things, saying the wrong thing, etc.)

 

b)  What is the history of errors and mistakes? Is it increasing over time? What are the forces that keep it going? (e.g., more complex society, inadequate training, human nature, etc.)

 

d)  What do the experts say about why people make errors? What are their theories and explanations? How serious a problem is it? Are errors inevitable? What factors influence the rate or occurrence of errors and mistakes?

 

e)  What should be done about it? What could be done about it? What is your own error rate for various tasks or activities? Is this something you discuss or think about?

 

 

(10) La Femme Nikita Fan Movement

 

a)  What is this activity by fans and producers? What forms does it take on the Web and elsewhere? (e.g., music, content reviews, writing new fictional episodes by fans, discussion forums, marketing, interviews, etc.)

 

b)  What is the history of  La Femme Nikita? Is the interest increasing over time? What are the forces that keep it going?

 

c)  Why does this type of fan movement exist? What do people get out of it? What other such movements are there going on? What characteristics does a show need to have in order to gain this type of loyalty?

 

d)  What do the experts say about it? What are their theories and explanations? Why would they cancel such a show when so much interest exists for it?

 

e)  How are you involved in this or similar fan loyalty movements? Is it a topic with friends?

 


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