Psychology 409b Research Seminar on the Unity Model of Marriage G29, Spring 2009 University of Hawaii

Dr. Leon James, Instructor

v.13

Instructions for Class Activities

 

Table of Contents

 

Readings: Book Chapters. 1

Weekly Class Schedule for Each Student. 1

Additional Instructions for Class Exercises. 9

Instructions for Oral Presentations. 21

 

 

Readings: Book Chapters

 (LJ) The Unity Model of Marriage by Leon James. Online Lecture Notes available here http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/leonj/leonpsy28/409b-g28-lecture-notes-p1.htm

(BD) What Women Want Men to Know by Barbara De Angelis

(DT) You Just Don’t Understand by Deborah Tannen

(LS) The Proper Care and Feeding of Marriage by Laura Schlessinger

 

Weekly Class Schedule for Each Student

 

Class 1 (J/13)

Practice team debate on living together without specific plans to get married

 

Class 2 (J/20)

Repeat with new teams after reading assigned articles and viewing some of the videos.

Team for the Resolution                               2, 3, 4, 10
Team against the Resolution.     5, 6, 9, 14
Team of Commentators                                1, 7, 11, 12, 13,
Team of Raters                                 15, 16, 17, 21

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

All students must read the assigned articles and watch a few YouTube videos on “couples living together”, and read news articles by going to news.goggle.com and searching for “couples living together.” This will allow you to discuss the issue in more detail than the first time around.

 

Class 3 (J/27)

Generational Curriculum Exercise

                                                All students are scheduled for this. See Instructions for Class 3 Exercise below.

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

 

Class 4 (F/3)

Team Presentations of Readings:

                Team A:                               10, 11, 12, 13                      LJ 1.0 to 1.1 | BD 1, 2 | DT 1, 2

                Team B:                                14, 15, 16, 17                      LJ 1.2 to 1.3 | BD 3, 4 | DT 3, 4

                Raters:                                  9, 18, 19. 20, 21

                Commentators:                                1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Completing the Generational Reports (see Class 3)

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

 

 

Class 5 (F/10)

Teams Presentation of Readings:

                Team A:                               9, 18, 21                                LJ 1.4 to 1.5 | BD 5, 6 | DT 4, 5

                Team B:                                1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7                  LJ 1.6 | BD 7, 8 | DT 6, 7

                Raters:                                  10, 11, 12, 13

                Commentators:                14, 15, 16, 17

 

Team Class Exercise: Neo Poem Challenge

                                                Team A:               9, 18, 21

Team B:                1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Raters:                  6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17

See Instructions for Class 5 Exercise below.

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

 

Class 6 (F/17)

Team Presentation of Readings

                                Team A:                               10, 11, 12, 13      LJ 2.0 | BD 9, 10 | DT 8, 9

                                Team B:                                14, 15, 16, 17      LJ 2.1 | BD 11 | DT 10

                                Raters:                                  9, 18, 21

                                Individual Commentators: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Team Class Exercise: Neo Construction Challenge

                                                Team A:               9, 10, 14, 16, 17, 18, 21

Team B:                1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Raters:                 11, 12, 13, 15

See Additional Instructions for Class 6 Exercise below.

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

 

 

Class 7 (F/24)

TeamsPresentation of Readings:

                                                Team A:               5, 6, 9, 18, 21      LJ 2.2 | BD 12

                                                Team B:                1, 2, 3, 4                LJ 3 | LS 1, 2, 3 (note: one student does all of LS, while the other three share LJ 3)

                                                Team C:                7, 14, 15, 16         Soap: Overall Instructions and Dinner Table Dialog and Transcript Analysis

Team D:               10, 11, 12, 13, 17               Soap: How to Write Dialog for Each Scene and Sexy vs. Unsexy Conversational Style of Husbands

Teams meet to plan the Soap presentations. You need to study and print out the instructions prior to your team meeting. The Instructions for Writing and Presenting the Weekly Soap Dialogues are at: http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/leonj/leonpsy29/soap-dialog.htm

Postponed:

Team Class Exercise: Second repeat of Man’s Loves—see the new Table

Team Class Exercise: Neo Fishing Challenge

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

 

Class 8 (M/3)

Teams Presentation of Scene 1: Generational Curriculum Instructional Soap

http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/leonj/leonpsy29/soap-dialog.htm

Each Team presents for 10 mins.

                                                Team 1 (MC):                     1, 7, 14

                                                Team 2 (EQ):                      2, 9, 15

                                                Team 3(WC):                      3, 10, 16

                                                Team 4 (MC):                     4, 11, 17

                                                Team 5 (EQ):                      5, 12, 18

                                                Team 6 (WC):                     6, 13, 21

Note: MC=Man Centered (male dominance); EQ=Equity; WC=Woman-Centered (unity)

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

 

 

Class 9 (M/10)

Team Presentation of Readings

Team A:                               1, 7, 14, 5, 12      LJ Section 10 in Part 2b | BD 7 | LS 4, 5

Team B:                                2, 9, 15, 6, 13      Do Exercises 10.1 and 10.2 in LJ Section 10 | BD 8 | LS 6

Raters:                                  3, 10, 16, 21

Commentators:                4, 11, 17, 18

Completing unfinished business

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

 

 

Class 10 (M/17)

Team Presentation

Team Class Exercise: Instructional Marriage Soap: Scene 2
Each Team presents for 10 mins.

                                                Team 1 (MC):                     3, 10, 16

                                                Team 2 (EQ):                      6, 13, 21

                                                Team 3(WC):                      1, 7, 14

                                                Team 4 (MC):                     5, 12, 18

                                                Team 5 (EQ):                      4, 11, 17

                                                Team 6 (WC):                     2, 9, 15

Note: MC=Man Centered (male dominance); EQ=Equity; WC=Woman-Centered (unity)

Check dialog instructions for Scene 2 at:
http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/leonj/leonpsy29/soap-dialog.htm#_Toc222547884

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

 

 

Class 11 (M/31) (no class M/24)

Team Presentation of Readings

Team A:                               4, 9, 12, 15, 21                    LJ Part 3/ Section 16a | BD 12 | LS 7

Team B:                                3, 6, 11, 16, 18                    LJ Part 3/ Section 16b | BD 11 | LS 8

Raters:                                  2, 5, 10, 17

Commentators:                1, 7, 13, 14

 

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

 

 

Class 12 (A/7)

Team Presentations on Readings

                Team A:                               1, 2, 10, 13           LJ Part 3/ Section 16c | BD 10 | LS 3

                Team B:                                5, 7, 14, 17           LJ Part 3/ Section 16d | BD 9 | DT 2

                Raters:                                  3, 6, 11, 15, 21

                Commentators:                4, 9, 12, 16, 18

 

 

Class 13 (A/14)

Team Class Exercise: Instructional Marriage Soap: Scene 3

Each Team presents for 10 mins.

                                                Team 1 (MC):                     1, 6, 15

                                                Team 2 (EQ):                      7, 10, 18

                                                Team 3(WC):                      2, 5, 12

                                                Team 4 (MC):                     9, 13, 14

                                                Team 5 (EQ):                      3, 16, 21

                                                Team 6 (WC):                     4, 11, 17

Note: MC=Man Centered (male dominance); EQ=Equity; WC=Woman-Centered (unity)

Check dialog instructions for Scene 3 at:
http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/leonj/leonpsy29/soap-dialog.htm#_Toc222547884

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

 

 

Class 14 (A/21)

TeamsPresentation of Readings

                Team A:                               3, 4, 11, 21           LJ Part 3/ Section 16e | BD 8 | DT 3

                Team B:                                6, 9, 15, 18           LJ Part 3/ Sections 19+20 | BD 7 | DT 4

                Raters:                                  1, 5, 7, 10, 12

                Commentators:                2, 3, 14, 16, 17

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

 

Class 15 (A/28)

Teams Presentation

Team Class Exercise: Instructional Marriage Soap: Scene 4

Each Team presents for 10 mins.

                                                Team 1 (MC):                     4, 11, 17

                                                Team 2 (EQ):                      1, 6, 15

                                                Team 3(WC):                      7, 10, 18

                                                Team 4 (MC):                     2, 5, 12

                                                Team 5 (EQ):                      3, 13, 14

                                                Team 6 (WC):                     9, 16, 21

Note: MC=Man Centered (male dominance); EQ=Equity; WC=Woman-Centered (unity)

Check dialog instructions for Scene 4 at:
http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/leonj/leonpsy29/soap-dialog.htm#_Toc222547884

3 PM Team Meetings preparing for Presentations and Reports

 

 

Class 16 (May 5) Last class and PARTY

See the instructions and team lineup here:

http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/leonj/leonpsy29/soap-dialog.htm#_Toc228020477

 

Additional Instructions for Class Exercises

 

Class 2 Exercise (J/20)

 

Resolved that in general, living together without plans for getting married is detrimental to both the man and the woman, though in different ways.

  1. There are 4 teams of students scheduled. Each team receives a job title, and meets together to prepare for it:

    The Team for the Resolution
    The Team against the Resolution
    The Team of Commentators
    The Team of Raters

    Make sure that you read all of the instructions below so that you are aware of what each team will be doing in relation to your team. Review the criteria for points in the instructions for the Team of Raters. This will allow you to prepare better for your presentation.

  2. The Team for the Resolution prepares by making a list of the detrimental effects, and a list of the advantages and conveniences of doing it, which is why many young people say they are doing it. Compare the two lists. Now try to separate the detrimental effects on women and on men. These may be different. It might be worse for women than for men if the two break up later. Why is this? Now try to show that the conveniences involved do not take care of the detrimental effects (especially for women), and that in the long run, these temporary conveniences are not worth the emotional and social cost. Here are some issues you need to cover:

    (a) Will the woman be able to trust a man in the future?
    (b) Will she be able to give her total self to that man?
    (c) Does she hurt her self-esteem as a woman to live with a man who is not going to marry her?
    (d) Can she achieve true love that way?
    (e) Is living together a convenient way for the man to have a sex partner to whom he does not want to commit?
    (f) Does this role hurt the woman’s sexuality and freedom?
    (g) Why does the man not want to marry her, or at least commit to marriage in the future?
    (h) When the man does not want to commit to the woman, can he love her?
    (i) Are the woman’s financial rights protected in a non-marriage relationship?
    (j) If the man is not committed to the woman, can he change for her and become the man she needs, the man she wants him to be?
    (k) What are the implications for the children that may be born? Should they commit to getting married if that happens?
    (l) If the woman wants to get to know the man before deciding to get married to him,
    (m) How does this issue affect others, such as friends and family?

    All members should be taking notes during the meeting and during your preparation while reading the articles and the lecture notes. Now plan your presentation by deciding who will present what arguments. Each member can speak more than once, but once is the minimum.

  3. The Team against the Resolution prepares the same way. See the notes for Team for the Resolution. Your task is to make sure the above issues are addressed by you, as listed in questions (a) to (m) above.
  4. The Team of Commentators prepares the same way. Now make up several questions you can address to the members of the For and Against teams. You need to take notes during each presentation, jotting down some of the things that

    * were not presented clearly or need further amplification
    * were not logical or convincing and need to be re-stated
    * were ignored when they should be taken into account
    * etc.

    After both teams finished their presentation, each of you will take turns addressing questions to particular team members. You can take more than one turn. Each of you must ask a minimum of two questions. Be sure to listen to the answer, and come up with follow-up questions to help the speaker address the issue more specifically. You are also encouraged to state your own opinions or reasoning, since your role is to be a “critic” as a way of stimulating debate, and not an impartial “judge” to evaluate the presentation. You can also use appropriate humor, if you like. But keep in mind that the goal you need to achieve is bring out additional ideas and perspectives that were not considered.

  5. The Team of Raters prepares the same way. Make a list of the issues that the two teams should handle effectively.

    Now rate each of the 8 speakers in the two teams:
    3 points:               convincing argument, took care of both sides, effective presentation style
    2 points:               convincing argument, tried to address both sides, not very effective presentation style
    1 points:               not convincing, did not address both sides, not very effective presentation style

    Record the ratings while the person is speaking, or towards the end. Make sure you identify the team (For or Against), and the speaker (name and number).
    Finally, add up the scores for each team and give it to the Chair who calculates the total (or the average) and writes it on the blackboard. Winning team members will receive 1 bonus point each for their grade point total.

 

All students must read the assigned articles and watch a few YouTube videos on “couples living together”, and read news articles by going to news.goggle.com and searching for “couples living together.” This will allow you to discuss the issue in more detail than the first time around.

 

Class 3 Exercise (J/27)

 

Generational Curriculum on the Unity Model of Marriage

  1. Each student will be presenting. Select one paragraph from two different generational student reports for this class (two paragraphs in all). The two reports must be from a different generation.
  2. First, identify the generation and the name of the student. Second, identify the Title of the report. Third, briefly explain what the students were supposed to accomplish in that report. Fourth, read the paragraph to the class (read slowly, with a strong voice, and look up frequently). Fifth, explain what it means to you. Select something that is meaningful to you, or, noteworthy for others to think about. Make sure you read the whole student report so you have a context from which to present your selection. Remember: There are 5 sub-tasks you need to perform, and you need to make sure you perform each sub-task as a separate act that your audience (and professor) can easily notice. Consult your notes as you talk to make sure you don’t skip any of these 5 sub-tasks.
  3. You have a total of 4 minutes to make this presentation. Be sure to rehearse ahead of time. It helps if you practice with one or two other people, whose reactions will give you useful feedback. Sit a few feet away from the listeners when rehearsing, in order to make sure that your voice is strong throughout the presentation. You can also practice with a tape recorder, putting the recorder on the other side of the room.

Use this directory to locate student reports specifically on the Unity Model of Marriage: http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/leon/499f2006/Links/ 

Or you can use the Generational Curriculum Directory of Student Reports at:
http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/leonj/leonpsy/gc/generations.html

The audience can ask questions at the end of each presentation.

 

Team Exercise on Man’s Love for Woman

 

First, each student goes over the list in order to consider each item, what it means.

Second, each student checks off each item across the three columns. Putting a check mark () means that you think that particular love will be present with the man. Leave it blank if you think that love is not likely to be present with that man.

Third, each student writes in the last five entries, and adds the check marks for them.

Fourth, students meet in Teams to be set up, and finalize together the 51 items to check as those loves that are not likely to be present with a man in that situation. Put an “x” for the group consensus, next to the check

you entered on your own. This is the consensus of the group, so it may not be the same as the individual line up you had on your own.

Fifth, add up the total/51 using this Table. Copy the Table to the black board, then hand in your copy to Dr. James.

A general discussion then follows.


 

Team 1  Date: Feb. 5, 2009

Individuals in Team
x/51

Living together
x/51

Equity Perspective
x/51

Unity Perspective
x/51

A

 

 

 

B

 

 

 

C

 

 

 

D

 

 

 

Consensus

 

 

 

 


 

Type of Love the man is likely to have

Living together

Husband Equity Perspective

Husband
Unity Perspective

  1. _____ The love of making her happy

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of having her as his wife

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of keeping her satisfied

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of not upsetting her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of doing things for her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of surprising her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of making her the most important person in his life

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of seeing her feeling good about herself

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of protecting her reputation

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of making her rich

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of taking care of her children

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of giving her status in the community

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of being loyal to her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of buying her things

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of giving up all his girlfriends for her sake

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of giving up all his friends for her sake

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of changing habits in order to become what she wants him to be

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of pleasing her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of spending all his free time with her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of spending all his life with her exclusively

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of spending all his eternity with her exclusively

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of feeding her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of making her feel special

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of being her sweetheart

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of being her soul mate forever

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of giving up selfish things for her sake

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of shopping for clothes for her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of protecting her privacy and keeping her secrets safe

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of defending her when she is being insulted or ridiculed

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of her being special in his eyes

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of him being her greatest love

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of her femininity and of protecting it

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of making love to her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of helping her with her chores

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of offering to take over some of her chores

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of easing her burden and reducing her stress

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of carrying things for her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of agreeing with her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of not disagreeing with her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of being best friends

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of singing for her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of extolling her qualities

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of making her feel good about herself

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of keeping their relationship exclusive

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of providing for her in old age

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of sharing his wealth with her

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of

 

 

 

  1. _____ The love of

 

 

 

 


 

Class 4 Exercise (F/3)

 

Presentation of Readings (see above) and Completion of Class 3 Generational Reports.

 

Class 5 Exercise (F/10)

 

Team Class Exercise: Neo Poem Challenge

1)      Each team member makes up a Neo Poem composed of between 6 and 10 entries from the Master Neochart at:
http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/neochartp1.htm#intro
Each entry forms one poem line. The selections must be restricted to topics that relate to this class. Make sure you first read the Introductory article there.

2)      Each student in turn reads the prepared poem. Start by giving an introduction explaining what the poem is about. Try to give an explanation that would help audience members figure out the meaning of the poem, since this will be the criterion for rating it. Remember: you cannot skip this part. You must prepare a paragraph that is sufficiently long to give the audience an idea of the meaning of your neo-poem, or the message it provides. This means you need to select the entry lines judiciously to create that coherence or message. After giving the explanation, tell the audience whether this message represents something new in your knowledge or understanding about marriage and relationships.

3)      The designated Raters (elect a Chair) will write down the rating given for each poem, using this scale:

Overall meaning was clearly presented in an interesting manner

3 points = excellent performance
2 points = average performance
1 point = needs improvement

4)      The Chair will supervise the task of adding up the scores and announce them to the class by writing the results for the Teams on the blackboard. Winning team members receive 1 bonus point each, to be added to their grade point total.

 

Class 6 Exercise (F/17)

 

Team Class Exercise: Neo Construction Contest

1.       Each team member makes up a Neo Poem of your own invention composed of between 8 and 14 entries Each entry forms one poem line. The selections must be restricted to topics that relate to this class. Make sure you read the Introductory article there.

2.       Each student in turn reads the prepared poem. Start by giving an introduction explaining what the poem is about. Try to give an explanation that would help audience members figure out the meaning of the poem, since this will be the criterion for rating it. Follow an alternating order between the two teams.

Each audience member will write down the rating given for each poem, using this scale:

3 points: overall meaning clearly understandable, interesting, fun
2 points: partly meaningful, interesting, fun
1 point:  no clear overall meaning, but interesting, fun

3.       Two volunteers add up the scores and announce them to the class. Winning team members receive 1 bonus point each, to be added to their grade point total.

 

Class 7 Exercise (F/24)

 

Team Class Exercise: Neo Fishing Contest

4.       Each team member makes up a Neo Poem composed of between 8 and 14 entries invented by others (not you and not Dr. James). Each entry forms one poem line. The selections must be restricted to topics that relate to this class. The selections can come from the Web, anything in print, the media, email, song lyrics, etc. Make sure you read the Neo Introductory article again so you understand the process better. http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/neochartp1.htm#intro

5.       Each student in turn reads the prepared poem. Start by giving an introduction explaining what the poem is about. Try to give an explanation that would help audience members figure out the meaning of the poem, since this will be the criterion for rating it. Follow an alternating order between the two teams.

Each audience member will write down the rating given for each poem, using this scale:

3 points: overall meaning clearly understandable, interesting, fun
2 points: partly meaningful, interesting, fun
1 point:  no clear overall meaning, but interesting, fun

6.       Two volunteers add up the scores and announce them to the class. Winning team members receive 1 bonus point each, to be added to their grade point total.

 

 

Class 8 (March 3) to Class 16 (May 5) on Writing and Presenting the Instructional Soap for Marriage

 

Please see this document: Generational Curriculum Instructional Soap at:

http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/leonj/leonj/leonpsy29/soap-dialog.htm

 

Instructions for Oral Presentations

 

After the roster call, and the initial Question-Answer Period (if anyone has any), there will be a 15-min. meeting of all Teams to prepare for the presentations.

 

Team members are expected to sit together in class during the presentations.

 

It is very important that each Team member come prepared to these meetings. Team members count on each other to be prepared by doing all the readings scheduled for that day. This applies to the two Teams of Presenters, the Team of Raters, and the Team of Commentators. Again: all students, not just the Presenters, are to read all the readings for the week, each week.

 

A presenter is expected to stand while making the presentation. Presenters are expected to begin by saying:

“My name is [First Name and Last Name] (both are required), and I have number zz. I am presenting Chapter 2 of the DeAngelis book.” (etc.)

 

Agree jointly on a presentation style that will go well with the content of the assigned readings. Examples of presentation styles include, but are not limited to, the following. You can use more than one style to present the three portions of your topic.

Prepare your part with the content, then meet again to rehearse with your team. When rehearsing together, be sure to make suggestions on each other’s performance for any changes you think might improve the presentation. Remember this: The content and the information is primary, while the presentation style is secondary. An interesting and entertaining style of presentation is possible while at the same time sticking to the useful aspects of the topic. Your main job is to present pieces of the topic and information that you have jointly identified as useful and worthwhile.

 

The Team of Raters are required to meet and come up each time with a method of assessment that is relevant to the scheduled topic and exercise. Each time, select a Chair. The assessment point system you make up should give positive points to each presenter for effective delivery style and clarity of explanations, and negative points for insufficient or unclear content. Since you are also familiar with the assigned chapters for the day you can assess the Presentation for its thoroughness and clarity. As a listener you also need to evaluate the effectiveness of the presentation style, whether it enhanced or detracted from the content. Be sure to take notes while the Presentation is going on, so you don’t rely on memory later. You can also ask the Presenter follow up questions when you think the point deserves to be made.

 

Each Rater adds up their point total for each team (an average might be needed if the two Presenter Teams are not the same size), and reports this total (or average) to the Chair. The Chair will then announce the results to the Class by giving the point total for each Team (or average), and writing it on the blackboard, and explaining at the same time, the rating scales that were used.

 

Winning Team members receive 1 Bonus Point. Note that only the two Presenter Teams (for Readings and for Exercise) are selected in advance on the schedule of classes. Raters and Commentators are selected at the beginning of each class, after Class Attendance is taken. Since you won’t know in advance which one you will be, it is especially important to support your team members by coming prepared. This means doing all the assigned Readings for that day, and to have your notes or questions with you for the team meeting.

 

Team of Commentators are required to meet each time and come up with about 10 questions based on the Readings for that day. For this to be successful, you need to write down questions as you read the assigned Readings, and bring your notes to the team meeting. Select a Chair. At least two Commentators must ask a question after each Presenter completes a presentation. Each Commentator is required to ask at least two questions for that day.

 

All students in class, regardless of the team, can ask follow up questions of any Presenter, or make comments. This general participation is a good practice for oral skills, and is encouraged. It also makes the class more interesting and dynamic. If you want to keep your 40 points for the oral grade you cannot remain silent. The Instructor keeps notes about all students as part of the point based grading procedure described in the Syllabus.

 

Back to G29 Home Page  ||  Back to Home Page of Dr. Leon James